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February 15, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RAGE ETGIFT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THTT'RRInAY_ VERRUAR:V 11C 1412

PAGE EIGHT THE MICflIE~A~ DAJIX TUTTI~~n LV ~'U'U~DT AD~Y I ~ lflBO

= s Ul A 5JPAX,115,~EL~UL~ijJX L),JLU§6

i

Fortune

Bounces

for

40-page brochure has facts:
: andfigurestohelpyou see
* Britain on a student budget:
SI How to travel 1000 miles by
train and boat for only $30.
___--100 places to get a single room
AGuide for for $3.50 a night, breakfast
Students Visiting Britain included-dormitory space
" ::costs less.
Discotheques, folk singing, jazz
clubs and boutiques. -
A week in London in a student
hotel for $30 with tours of the
. famous London sights and visits to
Oxford and Stratford-upon-Avon.
U ''-A week in an international student
*_ ~.centre for $25.
* Where to get lunch or dinner for$1.
How to choose your
" transportation to Britain.
Special student programs
starting at $675, including fare
} and tour.
Travel-study programs, work
s camps, summer schools.
" V_=-London theatres, balcony seats
" -~ $1.20-some gallery seats 70. U
British Travel
Box 923, New York, N.Y. 10019 -
Please send me your free 40-page brochure "Students Visit-
ing Britain" plus 52-page color book "Vacations in Britain." U
Name U
* College
Address
City State Zip U
* U MMMNMMMMMMMMMMM

By ANDY BARBAS He also holds the World Tram-
Hooray for the movies. poline title, the Nissen trophy, the
HooyfSchuster Cup, the Big Ten
Why? championship, and the National
If it weren't for the plots used Collegiate Athletic Association
in the movies, the story of junior (NCAA) trampoline title. In ad-
trampolinist Dave Jacobs would dition, he is the NCAA floor exer-

Jacobs
friend, who was taking lessons,
found out why Jacobs wasn't, he
talked to Nard.
Nard then came over to the
gas station and offered Jacobs
a job cleaning up the club and
doing other odd jobs in exchange
for lessons. As Jacobs noted, "I
was absolutely overwhelmed."

be one of the most unbelievable
stories ever presented.
Jacobs is the guy one hears
about whose father was in the
Air Force and died while his son
was a child. The son grows up,
finds a goal in life, and pursues
that goal by taking on odd jobs.
Someone finally discovers him
and gives him his big chance. He
succeeds and then owns the world.
Believe it?
It's true - well almost. Jacobs
doesn't own the world, but he
does hold every major trampolineI
title. Lasteyear,hersuccessfully
defended the National Amatuer
Athletic Union (NAAU) trampo-
linist title he won three years,
ago.
He also holds the World Tram-
polinist title he won three years
ago.

cise champion.
Jacob's introduction to tram-
polining is almost as unbelievable
as the number of tournaments he
has won. Though born °in Shey-
boygan, Wisconsin, Jacobs moved
while very young to Amarillo,
Texas when his Air Force father
was transferred there. He joined
the Boys' Club when he was 11.
It was there that he had his first
encounter with a trampoline.
The club had a tumbling pro-
gram which offered trampolining
after passing a series of tumbling
prerequisities. As Jacobs said, "I
don't think I ever wanted to do
anything as much 'as get on that
trampoline."
In his zeal to pass the tumbling
exercises, he became the best
tumbler in the club. He also be-

t

Jacobs improved under the
coaching of Nard and he eventu-
ally began to teach classes.
Through him, Jacobs was able to
learn many new techniques.
When Jacobs was a junior, he
wanted to compete in the na-
tional AAU trampoline champion-
ship. Unable to afford the trip,
he was about to abandon the idea
when Nard again came to his res-
cue. This opportunity proved to
be the biggest break of all for
Jacobs.
Against the Big Guys
He traveled to Kingspoint, New
Yolk, for the competition. Though
ony a junior in high school com-
peting against mostly college
gymnasts, Jacobs still placed
third in the tournament.
Because of his accomplish-
ments, he was invited to tour
with the Wonderful World of
Sports, a group touring the east-
ern United States to raise funds
for the American Olympic team.

DAVE JACOBS

gan his work on the trampoline
with even greater success. He be-
gan competing and won the Texas
State ChampionshipandhSouth-
western AAU trampoline cham-
pionship when he was 14.
The next year he was harras-'
sed by some of the other mem-
bers in the Boys' Club who told
the director that he wasn't prac-
ticing and was arguing withj

QU ICK KIICKS

By The Associated Press
BOB GIBSON, who pitched the
St. Louis Cardinals to victory in
the World Series by winning three
games from the Boston Red Sox,
signed his contract for the 1968
season for an estimated $80,000.1
JOE PEPITONE signed another
$38,000 contract with the New
York Yankees and promised to:
bear down all the way after last
year's disappointing season.
The Chicago White Sox sent
infielder RON HANSEN, and
pitchers DENNIS HIGGINS and
STEVE JONES to the Washington
Senators for second baseman TIM
CULLEN, and, pitchers BOB
PRIDDY and BUSTER NARUM.
* * *
The Los Angeles Dodgers trad-
ed second baseman RON HUNT
LAST ISSUE
EVER!
maybe
on sale-Wed., Feb. 21st
Buy it, Read it, Destroy it!

and utility infielder NATE OLI-
VER to the San Francisco Giants
for catcher TOM HALLER and a
minor league player to be named
later.
* * *
SEATTLE and King County
voters endorsed a $40 million bond
issue for a domed, multi-purpose
stadium in a special election and
will field an American League
baseball team next year.

everyone. As a result, he was told During the tour, he worked with
he wouldn't be able to defend his two trampolinists from Michigan,
titles. Eddy Cole, the NCAA trampoline
Despondent, Jacobs quit the champ, and Ronny Munn.
Boys' Club and joined the foot- From these two, Jacobs learned
ball team as a sophomore. An in- to jump higher and to perform
jury to his knee forced him to the more complex tricks used in
drop the sport. He took up tennis college. They also corrected his
to strengthen his leg but soon one bad habit - jumping with
tired of the sport and got a job in his legs apart - by taping his
a gas station. ankles together when he slept.
Even with his job, Jacobs was Michigan Tales
not able to pay for trampolining
lessons at Nard's Trampoline The two trampolinists also told
Club in the city. However, when a Jacobs about Michigan. On the
way home, Jacobs stopped in Ann
Arbor to talk to gymnastics coach
S- .Newt Loken. The result of the

I.

"- ^ -- - '-.

Professional .Standings

NBA
Eastern Division

*Pliiladelphia
Boston
New York
Detroit
Cincinnati
Baltimore

W L
45 16
41 19
32 32
29 34
27 34
26 36

Be-
Pct hind
.738 -
.669 4
.500 15
.460 16
.443 18
.419 19'
Pct. hind
.708 -
.590 8
.587 8
.339 23!
.317 241]
.218 32

Western Division
W L
St. Louis 46 19
Los Angeles 36 25
San Francisco 37 26
Chicago 21 41
*Seattle 19 41
San Diego 14 50
* Gane not inciuded

NHL
East Division
W L Pts GF
Montreal 30 15 9 69 170
Boston 26 19 10 62 193
Chicago Za IN 13 63 164
New York 24 18 11 59 155
Toronto 23 22 9 55 147
Detroit 20 24 10 50 182
West Division
xPhiladelpliia 25 ' 20 8 58 134
Minnesota 22 23 9 55 138
Los Angeles 23 27 5 51 137
Pittsburgh 20 25 9 49 139
St. Louis 19 24 10 48 123
xOakland 11 33 11 33 110
x Game not included.
Yesterday's Results
Toronto 2, Montreal 4
Chicago 3. Boston 1
Philadelphia at Oakland, inc.
Pittsburgh 6, Minnesota 3
Los Angeles Z, St. Louis 2, tIe
Today's Games
Montreal at Detroit
New York at Minnesota

GA
114
162
162
141
126
177
121
161
173
,157
133
162

Yesterday's Results
Boston 118, Detroit at New York
New York 114, San Diego 102
Philadelphia at Seattle, inc.
Today's Games
Los Angeles vs. Chicago at Mil-
waukee, Wis.
SanFrancisco at San Diego
New York at Cinncinnati

visit was a scholarship to Michi-
gan.
Jacobs' freshman year here was
rather dull because he wasn't al-
lowed to compete. He. did enter
the World Championship where
he placed fifth after a missed
routine, and successfully defend-
ed his AAU title, won the year
before.
Last year, he came on the team
as the number two trampolinist,
behind Wayne Miller, the previ-
ous year's NCAA champion. Ja-
cobs and Miller alternated vic-
tories throughout the season.
When the Big Ten Meet was held,
Jacobs pulled away, eventually
winning the NCAA title. That
summer he again defended the
NAAU tramp title and won the
World Championship, held in
London.
Jumping Future
Jacobs' hopes for the future
still lie with the trampoline. He
graduates the same year West
Point's gymnastics coach will be
leaving, so he could conveniently
fulfill his military obligation as
its new coach.
One or two years as a profes-
sional may follow, then on to a
job with the Nissen Company, a
maker of gymnastics equipment.
But, if a coaching offer should
come up, Jacobs can perhaps help
some other athlete as he him-
self was once helped. -

A4

ri.

-

ABA
Eastern Division
Be-
W L Pct hind
Pittsburgh 39 21 .650 -
Minnesota 39 22 .639 1
Indiana 30 33 .476 10%/
New Jersey 30 33 .476 10/2
Kentucky 26 34 .433 13
Western Division
New Orleans 39 22 .633 -
Denver 33 25 .569 4V2
Dallas . 30 25 .545 6
Oakland 20 35 .364 16
Anaheim 21 38 .356 17
Houston 20 39 .339 18
Yesterday's Results
New Orleans 106b, Houston 97
New Jersey 1z1, Oakland 110
Minnesota 99, Indiana 96
Today's Games
Anaheim at Denver
New Orleans at Dallas
Minnesota vs. Indiana at Dayton

Sta rt

your tan

now!

S

0
1

LA

SP E

C

I

A

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0

F FE R

Vandals and Broken Heads
((Continued from Page 9)
There is another way, you know. You can help your school and
its conference by offering your support to the cause which now
occupies the center stage. And if you can't, or won't help, don't
cower in a corner or venture into the protecting night to propel a
hastily-considered brick.
If this issue dies, Big Ten officials would probably be more than
hippy to let it drop quietly and without a fuss. But there is a
definite and imerndiate need for a general housecleaning in the Inter-
collegiate Conference. Hypocrisy and false pride have no place at
Michigan. or her sister institutions which make up the most prestigi-
ous conference in the country.
I met a teen-aged friend of my sister when home recently, and
routinely asked him how school was going.
"Well," he sighed, "I can't complain."
What I should have told him is that you get lots of time to learn
that in college. And not just learning how to complain, but learning
what to complain about. Have you really stopped to consider the real
reasons for your condemnation of this issue?
Well, nobody is going to come after you if you fail to respond.
But the case is out in the open now, where it belongs, and it must
be fought out to the bitter end, no matter what the end result.
This is the purpose of a free press to-bring significant issues into
the open-and the duty of every person in a position to make
a useful contribution.
Your task now is to decide whether the matter can be allowed
to slip away, or whether a real and rational solution to the problem
should be sought.
And you don't have to be 21 to vote.
Join The Daily Today.

4
4

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.
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>-; ' ca,

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