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February 15, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-15

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

1Chinese

Aircraft

Attack

Commission DEMANDS U.S. LEAVE SOUTH:

Criticizes

INavy
WASHINGTON (A)-An Amer-
ican Navy plane has been shot
down off Red China's Hainan Is-
land, government sources said
yesterday.
Red Chinese MIG aircraft at-
tacked two unarmed American
planes which strayed near Com-
munist Hainan Island Tuesday
night. One was shot down, the
other fled to Da Nang, South
Vietnam:. '
The Pentagon said the two U.S.
Navy propeller driven Al sky-
raiders inadvertently strayed into
Hainan's airspace because of nav-
igational difficulties.
Shot Down
"One of the planes was ihot
down by Communist MIG air-
craft," the Pentagon announce-
ment said.
It placed the spot about five
miles off the east coast of Hainan
Island.
Peking Radio, in a broadcast
monitored in Tokyo, charged the
United States with -carrying out
"war provocations."
'Heavy Blow'
"Navy pilots of the People's
Liberation Army immediately
dealt a heavy blow and shot down
one of them and damaged the
other," Peking said.
At the Pentagon, Asst. Secre
tary of Defense Phil G. Goulding
said he did not know whether the
second plane which escaped had
been damaged or whether its pi-
lot was inured.
Goulding said this 1i;ot reports
he last saw the other plane in a
vertical dive and :moking."
No Comment
Goulding refused repeatedly to
say anything about the downed
pilot.
"I am not going to answer any
questions about the status of the
pilot," Goulding said.
He would not give a reason.
He also asserted: "I am not go-
ing to discuss any questions about
air-sea rescue operations."
Possible Search
This, suggested that U.S. forces
might be searching the. waters in
hopes of recovering the pilot.
t A preliminary report in Wash-
ington said that the pilot who
made it to Da Nang had seen a
parachute descending from the
plane that was shot down.
Red China claims territorial
waters out to 12 miles from its
coastline. The same limit applies
to its airspace.
No Match
The slow, flying Skyraiders -
no match for the supersonic MIGs
- were on a ferry flight from
Cubi Point in the Philippines to
the aircraft carrier Coral Sea, in
the Tonkin Gulf.
The carrier launches fighter
bombers on raids against North
Vietnam.
What happened to cause their
navigational difficulties was not
explained.
Goulding said he did not know
what the weather conditions were.
Only a few days ago another
Al Skyraider came within a few
miles of overflying Hainan but
turned back apparently without
incident.
/11IVI

Plane s,

Down

One

Guardsmen
Civil Disorders Panel
Considers Special
Federal Riot Force

N. Korea Threatens War
At Panmunjom Meeting
ANMUNJOM, Korea (/P)-North committed 73 other serious viola- patching armed murderers Into
ea told the Americans yester- tions of the trice in the past 44 the Republic of Korea."
that there will be war unless days. Glaring at Smith, Pak replied:

PA
Kore
day

WASHINGTON (A)--The Presi- "you take your bloody hands off 'The decision whether there is
dent's Commission on Civil Dis- Korea and withdraw from South peace or hostility depends upon
orders is considering recommend- Korea." the. whim of an apparently ir-
ing creation of a specially trained Maj. Gen. Pak Chung Kook of responsible North Korea," declared
federal force to deal with urban North Korea was replying to a Rear Adm. John V. Smith. senior
riots. U.S. charge at an Armistice Com- UN Armistice Commission repre-
Sources close to the commission mission meeting that the Comnu- sentative.
said the proposal reflects dissatis- nists had sent commandos into 4.
faction with the performance of IsYour side can have peace mere-
National Guard units in trying to Seoul to try to murder President ly by unilaterally stopping acts of
quell riots last summer. Chung Hee Park Jan. 21 and had aggression. You must stop dis-
Further evidence of this dis-
satisfaction was expressed in a
speech Tuesday night by MayorTh n H n iDi o a
John V. Lindsay of New York
sp e h T e d y n g tM yrJo n V Li d a of N w Y r hn City, vice chairm an of the com -
mission. ; j'A&I/ns t.rel.n ] s-"Ak.c a rra

"We don't want war, but we are
not afraid of it."

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3
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-Associated Press
SAIGON CLEANUP continues as three South Vietnamese Rangers move into a burning block of
houses which had been the last stronghold of a band of Viet Cong guerrillas. The guerrilla band was
annihilated after a nightlong battle last Friday.

MarinesEscalate Urban War;
V.C. Pressure High at Khe Sanh.

E
t
i

By The Associated Press
U.S. Adarine jets poured rockets,
napalm and tear gas yesterday
against North Vietnamese troops
holed up in Hue's walled Citadel in
one phase of an American air
campaign intensified on both sides
of the border.
GI Path
Explosives 'chipped at massive
stonework of the Citadel, once
the imperial grounds of Vietnam's
emperors, in an attempt to cut
a path for American Leathernecks
trying to root out the remnants
of a Hanoi regiment. But it was
slow work.
Field reports said almost no
progress was made through the
15th day of Vietnamese and
American operations against the
enemy force.

The rest of the city is largely
cleared of the Communists who
claimed it at the outset of their
lunar new year offensive.
Meanwhile, history's most con-
centrated aerial bombing cam-
paign is- under way around the
U.S. Marine base at Khe Sanh, a
qualified U.S. Air Force source
said yesterday.
Although large numbers of North
Vietnamese troops, supply, and
ammunition dumps have been pre-
sumably destroyed, Communist
pressure on the base 14 miles south
of the demilitarized zone builds
steadily.
Some Marine officers believe
that without the mighty bombing
campaign, Khe Sanh would bej
untenable.
Only 5,000 Marines face a forcej

I

of perhaps 20,000 North Vietna-
mese regulars.'
In extreme peril, such as a ma-
jor enemy break through of Khe
Sanh's defenses, the Marines prob-
ably would retreat into their
bunkers while U.S. planes dropped
thousands of antipersonnel bombs
to blow the North Vietnamese off
the Leatherneck positions.
Long range artillery with shells
that air burst could help but there
are only a few guns capable of:
this in position.
U.S. Close In
Marine officers in Da Nang say
that the North Vietnamese have
steadily closed in and that some
enemy bunkers and trenches are
only about 300 yards from the
Marine barbed wire.
At such a distance, radar bomb-
ing strikes are extremely hazard-
ous. Even visual bombing has to
be carried out with the utmost
care.
Two outposts guarding Sara-,
vane, -strategic town in southeast
Laos, were also attacked by North
Vietnamese, L a o t i a n military
sources reported.
They said government forces re-
treated but the outposts were not
entrenched positions. The out-
posts are about seven miles west
of Saravane. The action was not
considered significant since both
sides long have been maneuver-
ing around Saravane.
It is from Saravane that Laos
sends out patrols and planes to
watch or attack North Vietnam-
ese moving down the Ho Chi Minh
trail to South Vietnam.

Lindsay Speaks
Lindsay told the New York
State Publishers Association in
Buffalo:
"In its studies, the commission
found that the National Guard
won no medals in those cities
where it was called into burning
ghettoes.
Criticisms
"The guardsmen were under-
trained and perhaps overequipped.
By and large they were unsym-
pathetic to the Negroes. This
manifested itself in that the
guardsmen were unreliable, trig-
ger. happy and ineffective in deal-
ing with mobs in the streets."
Recommend Action
President Johnson appointed
the 11 member panel last July 29
to investigate the causes of riots
that erupted in Detroit, Newark
and other cities and- to recom-
mend preventative action.
There was no immediate official
National Guard reaction to the
development, but one officer said
he doubts the guard "would ob-
ject very strenuously" to forma-
tion of a special riot control force
because it "is a very unpleasant
job and nobody likes it."
The COURT THEATRE
2555 Burns Ave.
MACBIRD!
February 14, 15, 16, 17, 23, 24
March-Every Fri. and Sat.
8:30 P.M.
Tickets at Hudson's & W.S.U.
Gen Adm $3.00
Students/Groups $2.00
Information/Reservations
822-6655
kIH G

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,,
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a t;veaceHo esDim
PARIS G) - U.N. Secretary- policy in Vietnam. Both agreed
General U Thant conferred yester- that negotiations on Vietnam "are
day with a North Vietnamese dip- not for tomorrow," the sources
lomat and came away convinced said.
that peace in Vietnam is as far It was also emphasized during
away as ever, informed sources Thant's talks that Red Chinese
reported. influence in Hanoi, the North
After a 75-minute meeting Vietnamese capital, was discour-
with Mai Van Bo, head of the aging whatever sentiment there
North Vietnamese delegation in was in North Vietnam for negotia-
Paris, Thant was said to believe tion, the sources said.
that the positions of North Viet- Thant is taking the view that
I nam and the United States were if the bombing of North Vietnam
too far apart to hope for any early h
peace conference. halts he is satisfied that peace
Later Thant saw President talks will follow within three or
Charles de Gaulle, a critic of U.S. four weeks.

He said North Korea would
match build up for build up and
blow for blow and if it came to
that "all out war."
This was an open meeting of the
commission. The subject of the
intelligence ship Pueblo, seized by
the North Koreans Jan. 23, came
up only incidentally.
Pak brought up the Pueblo, say-
ing the United States was taking
advantage of the incident to make
"full preparations for war."
Cyrus R. Vance, the envoy sent
by President Johnson to try to
smooth over relations with South
Korea, put to a strain by the secret
negotiations at Panmunjom, again
postponed his departure for Wash-
ington.
The South Koreans have com-
plained that the United States
was paying too much attention to
the Pueblo incident and not
enough to North Korean threats
to South Korea's security.
They also do not like the secret
talks,. from which South Korea has
been excluded.
"Vance was to have left Seoul
Tuesday," after two days of talks
with Park, Premier Chung I Kwon
and other officials.

- .
The Amfbushe
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World News roundup I
T 1 ] 1

WAByThe Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
States is resuming military aid
to Jordan, the State Department
announced yesterday.
"Details are now being nego-
tiated with the Jordanian gov-
ernment," press officer Robert J.
McCloskey told a news conference.
The United States, McCloskey
added, "continues to believe that
restraint on all arms shipments
to the area is essential to the
stability of the Middle East."
ATLANTA, Ga.-Former Ala-
bama Gov. George Wallace an-
R SIT y E
SOCI

nounced yesterday that former}
Georgia Gov. Marvin Griffin will
be listed as his vice presidential
running mate in order to satisfy
procedural requirements in several
states.
* * *
ATLANTA, Ga.-A Negro sol-
dier, recently returned from Viet-
nam action, faces an Army court
martial today on a charge of dis-
respect toward a white officer.
Spec. 5 Emmett T. Doe Jr., 26,
of New York, who was a para-
trooper in Vietnam, has been
charged with ref ering to a captain
as "a white bastard."j

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
W. C. FIELDS
Film Festival!

CO SAR"
tot
ENT RERR JANICEADE vS GE -0RY-BEVERLY AAMSK A
Featuring the "Slaygire " Screenplay by HERBERT BAKER: Music Composed and Conducted by HUGO MONTENEGRO
Based on the novel by DONALD HAMILTON Produced by IRVINGALEN- Directed by HENRY LEVIN
A Meadway-Claude Picture/TECHNICOLOR' g

iii

Coming
FRIDAY

Suggested For Mature Audiences

I
r

uI'uvm
MUSICAL

INTERNATIONAI1
PRESENTATIONS
From France, Poland,
and Germany
28th Annual
Chamber Music
Festival
in Rackham Auditorium
Pro rams
LOEWENGUTH STRING
QUARTET. ___ 8:30, Fri., Feb. 16
Quartet in D major. Op. 45 -Roussel
Quartet in C major ---------Ibert
Quartet in F major - ----- Ravel
WARSAW CHAMBER
ORCHESTRA ..--.8:30, Sat., Feb. 17
Sinfonia in B-flat major --Albinoni
Nova Casa & Tamburetta -Jarzebski
Concerto for Violin in E major. Bach
Suite for String Orchestra --.Corelli
Concerto in A major-------Vivaldi
Concertino in G major --..Pergolesi
EARLY MUSIC
QUARTET_- - 2:30. Sun., Feb. 18
Italian t rottola and Instrumental In-

MON.-THURS. 7:00-9:00 FEAENHELATRE-t-
FRI. 7:00-9:00-11 :00 FOH VILLarE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"7691300
SAT. 3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-11:00; SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
2rid BIG WEEK--
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!
A PICTURE YOU'LL HAVE TO SEE-
AND MAYBE SEE TWICE TO
SAVOR ALL ITS SHARP SATIRIC
WIT AND CINEMATIC TREATS!"
-NEW YORK TIMES
"THE FRESHEST, FUNNIEST
AND MOST TOUCHING FILM
OF THE YEAR!" -SATURDAY REVIEW
"DON'T MISS IT!"-NBC-TV TODAY SHOWj

I

11

11-

&jy,

JOSEPH E LEVINE
PRESENTS
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN..t-
PRODUCTION
/ f!
-
S l o
/
THE

The Greatest Laffs
Of The World's
Funniest Man
2 Full-Length
FEATURES
"THE
BANK DICK"
---And---
"N EVER GIVE A
SUCKER AN
EVEN BREAK"
"SUCKER" AT
1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45
"BANK DICK" AT

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h is s e ,I 8 eM' arr i s
r B ea ch B I
..r ' e r o g
Ae~
s ge Up whent S n Se

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