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February 14, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-14

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1867

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACIF. N .

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~Af1I~ ~Tr~7w

r Uaa.1N A

i

WolverineS
T 10 n nn 7 TT

IUr

TipS

Illini,

67 -65

*

*

,

firstlg Ten Road Victory
Since Cazzie's Last Year
Special To The Daily maintain their tenuous lead for
CHAMPAIGN-A 40 point out- five minutes until Denny Pace, a
burst in the second half gave substitute forward for the Illini,
Michigan its first Big Ten bas- hit a pair of free throws to put
ketball victory on the road in two Illinois ahead 55-54.
years as the Wolverines upset Il- The lead changed back and forth4
linois 67-65. three times from that point, be- #
Michigan was down by nine at fore Michigan captain Jim Pitts .
half time, 36-27, but Bob Sullivan hit for two quick baskets after
and and Dennis Stewart led a stealing the ball to put Michigan
last half surge that gave the Wol- on top 64-61.
verines their second victory in The Illini then made fourx
eight conference games. straight points, the last two on
Still, it was not enough to bring Crew's two free throws with 48
Michigan out of the cellar as Min- seconds left in the game . to go
nesota upset Northwestern 85-80 in ahead 65-64. Sullivan, who startedr
last night's other Big Ten game, his second game at center, then BOB SULLIVAN
Sullivan led all Michigan scorers, hit a long jump shot that proved against theis in the second half
hitting for 18 points, most of the winning margain. After Pace to stop them firom driving in I
which came in decisive second fouled him, Sullivan followed wastreallyplse d withvy club,
half. The junior center hit seven of through with a free throw to seal wsral lae ihm lb
12 from the floor and' four out of t he vitr. ~concluded.
thevicory One of the biggest differences

I II

Gophers Edge 'Cats

* ,

MINNEAPOLIS P)--Last-place
Minnesota, led by Tom Kondla's
29 points, upset Northwestern
85-80 in a Big Ten basketball
game that dropped the Wildcats
into a third place tie last night.
Northwestern, going into the
game a heavy favorite to beat the
Gophers and tie Ohio State for
the conference lead, dropped be-
hind in the tense final minutes of
the hard-fought game.
Kondla, who had averaged'31
points in the last three games,
racked up 29 before fouling out
with 3:16 to go.
The Wildcats slumped back into
a third place tie with Wisconsin
at 5-3 in conference play. Minne-
sota, with a 2-7 record, failed to
climb out of the Big Ten cellar

when Michigan upset Illinois
67-65. The Wolverines are ninth
with a 2-6 showing.
LeRoi Gardner was second high
man for the Gophers with 19 and
sophomore Larry Overskei scored
18.
Dale Kelley, the Wildcat sopho-
more ace, pumped in 27 and Jim
Sarno scored 17.
The brisk play saw 28 fouls
called against Northwestern and
25 against Minnesota.
The Gophers outshot the Wild-
cats from the field,'37 per cent
to 34.9, and grabbed 52 rebounds
to 42 for the Wildcats.

TOM KONDLA

TheTIlir nri ok npearly lead;

Hits For 15

in the contest as two buckets each Pitts, who had a poor second
by Dave Scholz, Jodie Harrison half against Iowa last Saturday,
and Randy Crews gave Harv hit for 15 points. Stewart and
Schmidt's quintet a 13-5 lead with Tomjanovich both made 12.
les than four minutes gone in the Scholz tied with Sullivan for
first half. top game honor with 18 but the
Illinois continued to widen its junior was only able to hit on sev-
lead throughout the first frame en of 25 shots he took from the
on Harrison's driving layups gave floor. Crews and Harrison, who
the Illini a 36-27 half time bulge. sunk five ofhsix from the floor,
Michigan slowly cut down Il- followed with 16 and 15 points,
linois' nine point half-time lead respectively.
and finally went ahead 48-47 Michigan coach Dave Strack
with 12:15 to go in the contest. said the victory was due to the
Sullivan, Rudy Tomjanovich, adjustments the Wolverines made
and Jim Pitts combined to lead on defense in the second half and
the assault which left the fllini' the fine performances turned in
defense flat footed. They com- by Stewart, and reserve guard
bined to score 16 points in that Mark Henry.
span despite the fact that play- "Stewart gave us a real good
making guard Ken Maxey had left game in the second half, while
the game with his fifth personal Henry just dida great job," he
at 16:35. said.
The Wolverines were able to Stewart hit for eight points in
the second half and Henry came
MICHIGAN in when Maxey fouled out and
F G FT R F T grabbed five rebounds.
Tomianovicil , f 5-0 2-5 15 2 12 As far as the defense was con-
Stewart, f 5-12 2-3 10 5 12
Sullivan, c 7-12 4-7 8 4 18 cerned, Strack said "In the first
iMaxey, g 3-5 0-1 3 5 6 half we let their defense get to us
McClellan, f 0- 0-0 1 0 0 more than we should have. In the
Bloodworth, g 0-0 1-2 0 0 1 second half, we just played our
Edwards, f 0-0 0-1 1 0 0 own game on offense and threw
Henry, 1 1 1-3 5 3 3
Totals 28-58 11-28 51 22 67 a pretty good defense against them
FGA: .483 ourselves."

for the Wolverines last night was
their field goal accuracy from, the
floor. Michigan, which has had
trouble getting the ball through
the hoop hit for a .483 percentage.
While the Illini took three more
shots than the Wolverines, they
only were able to hit for a .378
percentage.
Michigan also maintained an
edge over Illinois on the back-
boards. The Wolverines, led by
Tomjanovich's game high of 15,
pulled down 51 rebounds to the
Illini's 31. Stewart had 10 while
Sullivan and Pitts each pulled
down 8.
Scholz led the Illini with 14 re-
bounds but he had little help
from his teammates.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
ROBIN WRIGHT

Big Ten Standings

WV L Pct.
Ohio State 6 2 .750
Iowa 5 2 .714
Northwestern 5 3 .625
Wisconsin 5 3 .625
Illinois 4 3 .571
Purdue 3 4 .429
Michigan State 3 4 .429
Minnesota 3 6 .333
Indiana 2 5 .286
MICHIGAN 2 6 .250
Yesterday's Results
MICHIGAN 67, Illinois 65
Minnesota 85, Northwestern
80
Saturday's Games
MICHIGAN at Indiana
Michigan State at North-
western
Ohio State at Minnesota
Wisconsin at Iowa
Purdue at Illinois

'68 ENGINEERING
& SCIENCE GRADUATES
U. S. Army Material Command will
INTERVIEW on CAMPUS: FEB. 19
for CIVILIAN STAFF opportunities
The army Moteric.l Command is an unusual man-
agement and technicel organization of great size and
scope with some 150,000 civilians, employed in labora-
tories and installations throughut the United States.
HERE ARE THE CAREER FIELDS IN WHICH THERE
ARE ENTRANCE LEVEL OPENINGS NOW FOR YOU!.
" Electronic & Electrical 0 Chemistry & Chemical
Engineering Engineering
" Biology & Related Fields * Mechanical Engineering
"t i-S Industrial Engineering
Mthematics-Statistics Meteorology &
" Physics Calibration
0 Advice & Assistance in Support of R&D Testing
and Evaluation
AMC's diversity in missions products, occupations and locations
constitutes an ideal career package for the highly motivated young
man or woman] AMC is concerned with research, development, design
and production, and testing and evaluation of all equipment developed
and used by the modern army.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR
PLACEMENT OFFICER
MAKE PLANS TODAY TO SEE THE AMC
REPRESENTATIVE
ON FEBRUARY 19'
an equal opportunity employer

RUSS GIBB PRESENTS IN CONCERT
FR:'DAY, FEB. 23
JIMMY HENDRICK'SEXPERIENCE
THE SOFT MACHINE, THE MC5, and THE RATIONALS
lights by MARK BOYLE'S SENSE LABORATORY
MASONIC TEMPLE AUDITORIUM
(Cass at Temple, Detroit)
Admission: $3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Tickets available-DISCOUNT RECORDS, Ann Arbor,
MASONIC TEMPLE BOX OFFICE, GRANDE BOX OFFICE,
J. L. HUDSON'S and GRINNELL'S
Phone: 834-9348
REPUBLICAN IllWEEK
Friday, February 16-
Ronald Reagan Film Festival: "Bedtime for Bonzo"
Natural Science Auditorium, 7:30 & 9:30 P.M. 50c
Saturday, February 17--
David Reed- "The Negro and Politics"
3K-L-M Un ior, 1:00 P.M.
Monday, Febuary 19-
"Urban Juvenile Crime." Film: "The Dangerous
Yea-," and We Hcn. Ross Campbell, _
Washtenaw County Probate Judge
UGLIMultipurpose Room, 9:00 P.M.
Tuesday, February 20-
College Republican Club Meeting-Local Politics
Mr. Donald Kenney (GOP Chairman, A.A.)
and City Counci candidates
UGLI Multipurpose Room, 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdov, February 21-
Nominaticns for Mock Presidential Election
Dr. hazel Losh, moderator; Mock Convention
camr.aign managers
UGLI Multipurpose Room, 7:30 P.M.
Thursday, February 22-
Mock Presidential Election at several
camrpus polling locations
9:00 A.M. to 4:15 P.M.
Friday & Saturday. February 23 & 24--
Michigan Federaticn of College Republicans
State Convention in Detroit
All Activities Open to Public
Sponsored by the U. of M. College Republican Club

j

Meet Your Ci
LEN
Democua

ity Council Candidate
QUENON
at, Second Ward

Price, I
Crews, f
Scholz, c
Busboom, g
Harrison, g
Pace, f
Louis, g
Totals
FGA: .375

ILLINOIS
FG FT
0-3 1-2
6-11 4-6
7-25 4-51
2-5 1-2
5-6 5-5
2-8 4-5
1-3 0-0
23-61 19-25

R
3
6.
14
3
2
2
1
i31

F
5
2
2
4'
3
3
0
191

T
1
16
18
5
15
2
65

Game Plan
"Our original game plan was to
really smash the defensive boards
because Illinois won't break on
you. We felt at half time we had
played very badly.
"We did feel, however, that
since we were only nine points
down, if we just played our nor-
mal game, we could catch them."
"It was a jaw to jaw game out
there. We played belly to belly

at
THE OLD GERMAN
Friday, February 6b... 9-12 P.M.
Brino ID-First pitcher of Beer FREE

MICHIGAN
Ilinois
Crowd 8,850

27 40-67
36 29-65

Wuhat does a
NASA project have to do
with flipping tractors?
A lot. At International Harvester, down-to-earth safety problems with tractors are being solved with space-age techniques.
IH engineers checking roll bar stresses in tractor roll-overs use the same basic radio telemeter that gathers data from
rockets. But IH involvement with the space age doesn't stop here. Special International' trucks filter rocket fuels. Exotic
IH metal fabrications are used in building rockets. When you join IH, you're joining a leader in the important fields for
tomorrow's world. Fields as basic and challenging as farm equipment and trucks. Fields as new as aerospace and gas
turbine power. Any company can turn you on. But few are in as many basic industries as International Harvester.
Our diversification multiplies your opportunities. Ask your College Placement Office for more information about us.

Grumman announces
an Engineering Masters Fellowship Program

International Harvester puts power in your hands
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
IIs

Extending man's reach is the challenge at Grumman. The
creation of advanced aircraft and space vehicles requires
creative design of a high order of magnitude if man is to
truly extend his reach in the domains previously denied
him. These vehicles, whether for defending the national
interest or for exploring extraterrestrial space, must be so
designed as to enable man to survive, function and fulfill
his mission in every environment. Then "the bring-back"
ability which only he possesses remains intact. At Grum-
man, all design requirements are delineated with this in-
eradicable fact in mind. The creativity necessary to attain
these requirements lies in the hands of the engineer who is
constantly striving to extend his technological
reach. To assist him, Grumman has created
an Engineering Masters Fellowship Pro-
gram. Fellowship applications are
now being accepted for the aca-
demic year beginning in
Autumn, 1968..
THE PROGRAM
The Fellowship
Program consists of
two basic types of awards. The first
is available directly to 1968 gradu-
ating engineers with Bachelors De-
grees in all engineering areas related
to aerospace. (Ten Fellowships of this
type are currently .available). The
second is open to engineers who have ,
been with. our company for a mini-
mum of one year. The Fellowship will
be granted for a year and will be re-
newable for an additional year upop
satisfactory completion of the 12-'
month work/study plan. An op-
tional feature of this program
permits six months rota-
tional work assignments in
order to broaden Fellows
technical base and allow
for evaluation of re-1
lated technical fields.

the full-time semester hours (approximately nine credits)
so as to complete his Masters Degree within a two-year
period. Fellows must pursue scholastic programs directly
applicable to the needs of the Corporation. Local resi-
dency and attendance at a local university are required.
Candidates for the Program must have at least a
3.0/4.0 grade point average (or the equivalent) for their
undergraduate work.
SALARY AND BENEFITS
The toal value of the Fellowships ranges from $10,750 to
$13,000 per year. The Fellow will be paid for the
number of hours worked per
week, based upon an egui-
table starting salary prevailing
at the,, time the Fellowship
commences. The Fellow's per-
formance will be evaluated dur-
ing the two-year period and he
will be eligible for raise con-
siderations in the same manner
as every other employee. He
will also be entitled to full
normal employee benefits. A
stipend of $1,000 for the Fellow
plus $500 for each dependent
(spouse and children) will be paid
each year,,plus full tuition,
books and fees.
APPLICATION
Application forms for the
Grumman Engineering
Masters Fellowship Pro-
gram for the academic
year beginning in
Autumn 1968
should be requested
immediately. Com-
pleted forms'must
reach our offices
by March 15, 1968.
Clip and mail the
coupon below now.
"*.«r«"f"""w«". """""'""""....b*"**4".
Mr. Thomas E. Fessenden, Director of
.: Engineering Services and Administration :
*.. GRUMMAN Aircraft Engineering Corporation

REQUIREMENTS
Each Fellow will be
required to work a
minimum of 24 hours
per week at Grumman
during the regular school
year and 40 hours per week
during the summer. Each
Fellow will also be expected
to carry a workload of one-half

L Z

El 1111131 1

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