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February 13, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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' . 1

TUESDJAY, FEBRSUARY 13, 1968

poetry and prose-
New Poets and Their New Poetry

records
Angel's Janet Baker

17h du Fait 'm

5th Ave. near Liberty--761 -9700

U - R

EDITOP'S NOTE: Ted. Berrigan, Tom Clark and Ron
Padgett will read from their works tonight at 8:00 p.m. in the
Union Assembly Room. They are participating in the last event
of the Creative Arts Festial-The Young Poets Festival. Ber-
rigan's published works include "Sonnets," "Bean Spasms,"
collaborations with Ron Padgett, and three songs written for
the Fugs. Clark was the editor of the "Once" series of magazines
and books, and is presently poetry editor of The Paris Review.
Padgett is important, of course, but doesn't like biographical notes.
Superballs
You approach me carrying a book
The instructions you read carry me back beyond birth
To childhood and a courtyard bouncing a ball
The town is silent there is only one recreation
It's throwing the ball against the wall and waiting
To see if it returns
One day
The wall reverses
The ball bounces the other way
Across this barrier into the future.
Where it begets occupations names
This is known as the human heart a muscle
A woman adopts it it enters her chest
She falls from a train
The womanrebounds 500 miles back to her childhood
The heart falls from her clothing you retrieve it
Turn it over in your hand the trademark
Gives the name of a noted maker of balls
Elastic flexible yes but this is awful
You say
Her body is limp not plsstic
Your heart is missing from it
You replace your heart in your breast and go on your way
-Tom Clark
Poem,
like musical instruments
Abandoned in a field
The party of your feelings
Are starting to know a quiet
The pure conversion of your
Life into art seems destined,
Never to occur
You don't mind
You feel spiritual and alert
As the air must feel
Turning into sky aloft and blue
You feel like
You'll never feel like touching anyone or anything
Again
And then you do
-Tom Clark

-Daily-Anita Kessler
"Young Poet" Ted Berrigan
Only the beautiful Closerie des Lilas escapes
our classification.
And still remains in Paris.
The lilac, is it round?
People here do a lot of sitting around
As in the Luxembourg Gardens
Where the toy sailboats go round the artificial pond.
They do this.
Last but not least-and how natural!
Are the paintings of Robert Delaunay
Called The NVindowsF
In which Paris is seen
As lots of circles.
-Ron Padgett
Personal Poem
It's 8:54 a.m in Brooklyn it's the 28th of July and
it's probably 8:54 in Manhattan but I'm in
Brooklyn I'm eating English muffins and drinking
pepsi and I'm thinking of how Brooklyn is New
York city too how odd I usually think of it as
something all its own like Bellows Falls like little
Chute like Uijongbu
I never thought on the Williams-
burg bridge that I'd come so much to Brooklyn
just to see lawyers and cops who don't even carry
guns taking my wife away and bi inging her back
No
and I never thought Dick would be back at Gude's
beard shaved off long hair cut and Carol reading
his books when we were playirg cribbage and
watching the sun come up over the Navy Yard a-
cross the river
I think I was thinking when I was
ahead I'd be somewhere like Perry street erudite
dazzling slim and badly loved
contemplating my new book of poems
to be printed in simple type on old brown paper
feminine marvelous and tough
-Ted Berrigan

By R. A. PERRY
Angel Records, to whom the
enthusiast of great singing has
turned for such artists as Fischer-
Dieskau, Schwarzkopf, de los
Angeles, and Callas, has now
added another super-star to its
affluent family. That singer is
Janet Baker, called by Harold
Schonberg the second greatest
English i in p o r t since wool
(Beatles' devotees take note).
I recently heard Miss Baker sing
in the Verdi Requiem in Cleveland,
and she more than fulfilled the
impression she has been making
on records. Her mezzo-soprano
voice not only revealed round
notes of deep resonanceandtonal
purity, with a sense of untapped
reserve, but her vocalism also
goes beyond mere self-satisfac-
tion with its own rich sound,
Janet Baker searches for the
expressive heart of the music, in-
tent on matching feeling with
content. At its weakest, this may
be called "intelligent singing," but
at its most expressive, her voice
becomes only the agent for the
composer'sydeepest intentions.
Thus in the Verdi Requiem, her
voice delineated both fearful sup-
plications at the Judgment and
noble declarations of the Power
without ever seeming artfully dra-
matic for its own sake.
What Janet Baker's voice liter-
ally reeks of is High Victorian Ser-
iousness, the purely English orato-
rio sound that Kathleen Ferrier so
deeply possessed. Indeed, the com-
parison between the two singers
is inevitable and immediate.
All of this leads up to new
recommended Angel recording
Janet Baker Sings a Treasury of
English Songs, on which Miss
Baker surveys in fifty minutes the
history of English song writing.
With Gerald Moore at the piano,
Miss Baker sings love songs and
dirges from Dowland to Britten,
lingering over Campian and that
prolific composer "Anon." Arne's
"Where the Bee Sucks" especially
reveals Miss Baker's versatility,
and we begin to think that there
is as much soprano as mezzo to
this singer's voice.
If the solemn and sanctimonious
tone of latter-day English song
writing little shits your fancy, you
might do better by the piano mus-
ic of Erik Satie. Satie, the arch
Dadaist composer, has been re-
cently embrased by John Cage's
coterie - the importance of si-
lence, the incorporation of incon-
gruous sounds, the seriousness
beneath the apparent pution.
Satie's titles, such as "Veritable
Flabby Preludes (for a dog) " and
"Chapters Turned Every Which
Way," may suggest Happenings
(and indeed he once drove a ja-

I'op Billing
lopy through one of his own bal-
lets), but at the same time they
are almost defenses for the ser-
ious wit and compositional con-
trol in the music itself. Thus,
despite Satie's popularity with the
avant-garde, this music will not
blow your mind.
Angel's first recording of Satie's
piano music reached a small
audience, but recently it has been
selling very well. Therefore, this
month saw Piano Music of Erik
Satie, Volume II. The pianist on
both records is Aldo Ciccolini, and
his frequent heaviness and lack of
fine shading vitiates a certain
amount of the music's spirit.
Nevertheless, his are the only
recordings and they are still mar-
velous fun. I suggest Vol. I over
the new set only because it con-I
tains the beautifully serene "Trois
Gymnopedias" as well as the Za-
zie-like counterparts.
From the recording contract be-
tween Angel and Russia's Melodiya
have come many excellent discs
by Russian artists. Nikolai Petrov,
the 1964 Gold Medal winner of the
Brussels Competition, this month
received his recording debut in
performances of Rachmaninoff's
Piano Concerto No.. 4 and Proko-
fiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 that
make critical quibbling over tech-
nique absurd.
Rachmaninoff's concerto is full
of that sound and fury which sig-
nifies idiom, Russian Gershwin if
you will, but Prokofiev's score is
rich in idea and irony. The stereo
sound leaves no doubt about Rus-
sian recording techniques.
w..- .
3020 Washtenaw Ph. 434-1782
Between Ann Arbor & Ypsi
Show Time: Wed.-Sat.-bun.
1:00-3:03-5:06-7:09-9:15
Mon.-Tues.; Thurs.-Fri. 7:05-9:15

OWN
}tr<
tit
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sit
19
X.
rtitif
:h

-L v i ns. i Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9
Fri. & Sat. 1 -3-5-7-9-11; Sun. 1 -3-5-7-9
F4 : ' lf to be demolished
wj zn you go to see it and go you
must! Onc of ; Gbest films of the year!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
II
"IN THE LONG TRADITION OF CINE-
MATIC SHOCKERS! A classic chiller of
the Psycho'school and approximately
twice as persuasive!"-Time
"THE SHEER VOYEUR APPEAL OF A
NIGHTMARE! Horrors are brilliantly
filmed, the shocks are shocking, with
a supreme taste for the macabre!"
-Judith Crist. N Y, Herald Tribune
"A TOUR-DE-FORCE OF SEX AND
SUSPENSE! 'Repulsion' is flawless! It
establishes Roman Polanski as a
master of the macabre.$.Lfe
"A BRILLIANT EXERCISE IN PSYCHO-
LOGICAL SUSPENSE, terror and mur-
der! Can turn you inside out!"
William Wolf, Cue
TUES.
AND WED.
at 7:00 & 9:00
ROMAN POLANSK S
CATHERINE DENEUVE&A1iS h;iMA E M

oS

Around Paris
Everything in Paris is round.
First is the city itself
Intersected by an arc-
Which is a division of a circle-
Which is The Seine.
Then the well-known spokes
Around the Arch of Triumph.
The cafe table tops are round as well
As the coasters (and many of the ash trays)

STARTS THURSDAY-Beatle JOHN LENNON
and MICHAEL CRAWFORD in RICHARD LESTER'S
]gosf I WoII Wa
s"":E r Maun +wian~

Join The Daily Today!

That sit upon them.
Lobking up, the cafes themselves
Their names at least. are round.
Over there for instance is La Ronde,
La Dome, La Rotonde
And others.

} _

La Coupole,

Find it with a
Daily Classified

Ends Thursday
HERE IT IS..
The Long Awaited
W. C. FIELDS
Film Festival!

THE
PICTURE
YOU
WILL NOT
SEE ON
TELEVISION!
PARAMOUNT PICTUJRES gsets
PETER COLLNSON'S
The
Penthouse
Coming
Thursday!

Losey " Cd "
"LIKE A PUNCH IN THE CHEST. PUT
TOGETHER BREATH BY BREATH,
LOOK BY LOOK, LUST BY LUST,
LIE BY LIE. A COMPELLING FILM:'
-Newsweek Magazine
WINNER TWO CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS
Dirk Bogarde-" Stanley Baker
, The Joseph Losey
Production of
accident
Screenplay by
Harold Pinter
Directed by
Joseph Losey
In Color
SHOWS AT DIAL
7 and 9 P.M. 8-6416

I

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SHOWING

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FOX EASTERN THEATRES in MON .-THUR
FOR VILLa5E 7:00-9:00
375 No. MAPLE RD. -769.1300
SAT.-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-11:00
00-11:00 SUN.-1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

LEEM N
'ergeant
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE in COLOR
Based upon the TV Production "THE CASE AGAINST SERGEANT RYKER"

S.

Y:.. .::. f:: { .
t r
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:.,

FRI.--7:00-9:

The Greatest Laffs
Of The World's
Funniest Man
2 Full-Length
FEATURES
"THE
BANK DICK"
And -
"NEVER GIVE A
SUCKER AN
EVEN BREAK"
"SUCKER" AT
1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45
"BANK DICK" AT

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!
A PICTURE YOU'LL HAVE TO SEE-AND MAYBE
SEE TWICE TO SAVOR ALL ITS SHARP
SATIRIC WIT AND CINEMATIC TREATS"
-New York Times

iC

1:15-3:1.5
5:20-7:25 last
9:35

2 days

STARTS
THURSDAY

0
4

OEPH E. LEVINE
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN,.-
"I"W
\

A COOL
PRIVATE EYE
WHO TURNS ON
FOR ALL THE
RIGHT SCENES
AND WRONG
WOMEN!

IUI E UE ECoStarring

I

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