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February 11, 1968 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-11

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RTTNDAV_ TFRRYTARV 11- 19RR.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T EE

iflI 1 M I1CUIGAN DAIY 111Y PAGE THREE .:

Rockefeller Plan Ends Pueblo Talks Rei'EvIieFORCE:
. Unw fr (7r"mn Commission Charg4

es Police,

N.Y.C.

I

BULLETIN
NEW YORK (M)-Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller said late last
night that the striking city gar-
bagemen's union had agreed to
return to work immediately un-
der a plan to have the state
temporarily take over the city
sanitation department.
The proposal to end the nine-
day strike embodied payment to
the 10,000 strikers at a rate
Mayor John V. Lindsay had al-
ready called "blackmail." Lind-
say immediately charged that
Rockefeller had "capitulated" to
the union.
"I had hoped that the gov-
ernment would join me in com-
batting the extortionate de-
mands of the sanitation union,"
Lindsay said in a statement
shortly after Rockefeller an-
nounced his plan to end the
strike on radio and television.
"I deeply regret that he has
chosen not to do so."'
Even as Lindsay was issuing
his statement, a spokesman for
the Uniformed Sanitationmen's
association, an affiliate of the
Teamsters union, ' said some
strikers already were returning
to their jobs to begin the mam-
moth task of removing an esti-
mated 100,000 tons of garbage
fram the streets.
NEW YORK (T)-Gov. Nelson
i. Rockefeller said last night that
he striking city sanitationmen's'
mion had agreed to return to
vork immediately, under a plan
hat would allow the state to take
)ver garbage clearing chores.
Rockefeller said he would call a
;pecial session of the legislature
omorrow and ask necessary legis-
ation to run the department un-
ier a mediators' proposal already
ejected by Mayor John V. Lind-
;ay as "black mail.
$425 Raise
The plan would grant the 10,000
striking garbagemen a $425 raise.
Lindsay had said he would not
consider anything greater than
$375.
A union official said the sani-
tationmen's president, serving a
15-day sentence for leading the
strike, was informed of the Rocke-
feller plan at the city jail and ac-
cepted it.
Rockefeller announced his so-
lution to the strike over radio

Garbage Strike
and television. He said Lindsay Rockefeller's proposal to take
had already been informed of the over the sanitation department
proposal, but Lindsay was miles came as organized labor threat-
away at his official residence, ap- ened to shut down the city with as
parently watching the governor on general strike if the governor
television with millions of other bowed to Lindsay's request for the:
New Yorkers. guard.
The governor said he had told "We will not tolerate the use of
Lindsay again that he would not National Guard troops againstI
call out the National Guard to workers in this city," said Harry
clear away 'the estimated 100,000 Van Resdale, president of the mil-
tons of garbage on the streets. lion-member AFL-CIO Central
Lindsay had asked repeatedly for Labor Council. He said its execu-
the guard to be called out as the tive board in emergency meeting
only solution. had authorized the general strike
r,_...., t .... i of troom were called

SEOUL (A'}-Hopes for release
of the Pueblo crewmen rose again
yesterday with reports of the
fifth U.S.-North Korean secret
meeting and the impending ar-
rival of U.S. trouble-shooter Cy-
rus Vance. The crewmen have
been held prisoner in .Communist
North Korea for 17 days.
A source close to the South Ko-
rean government revealed thatI
Seoul officials believe the North
Koreans may band over the one
dead crewman and the three in-
jured men in the not-too-distant
future, but that the other 79
American prisoners will have a
longer wait.
Vance, en route from Washing-
ton, is scheduled to arrive in Seoul
this morning. A former U.S.
Assistant Secretary of Defense,
Vance recently won attention
with his successful mediation ef-
forts to head off war between
Greece and Turkey over Cyprus.,
Smoothing things over with
South Korean leaders is seen as

Cites Consequences
Calling out the guard, Rocke-
feeler said, "would have the most
serious repercussions, possibly in-
cluding fighting in the streets.
The people in this city have
have enough suffering and I do
not want to add to it."
Lindsay had called in Rockefel-
ler last Thursday, declaring a state
of emergency.

JL -AL It-JF V It-/ N n-Jv N '%-A 6 n--/ IN/ IL/ AN N WIL-/ N IV

Impromptu
"You can't move garbage with'
bayonets," said Rockefeller at an
impromptu news conference in his
midtown Manhattan offices, where
marathon talks continued.
The general strike threat seemed
to strengthen Rockefeller's hand
in what has become a political
showdown with Lindsay.

MANSFIELD ECHOES LBJ:

a major though unannounced:
purpose of Vance's visit. The
South Koreans have been piqued:
by what they regard as U.S. over-
emphasis on the Pueblo incident
and relative inattention to the=
Communist guerrilla attempt on
the life of President Chung Hee
Park.
The White House said Friday
that Vance was going to Seoul to
see Park about "the measures to,
be taken by our two governments'
to deal with a North Korea sud-
denly grown more pugnacious."
Firmer Stand
There have been calls from
Korean legislators and studentI
demonstrators for a firmer U.S.
stance toward the Communists.
In a development from Wash-
ington, U.S. officials disclosed'
that eight Communist, MIG jet
fighters were overhead during the
seizure of the U.S. electronic in-]
telligence-gathering ship Jan. 23.;
The officials also said that bya
piecing together various scraps'
of intelligence they have deter-
mined that numerous shots were'
fired across the Pueblo's bow be-
fore she was halted.
Routine Message
Contradicting earliei U.S. state-
ments that the Pueblo had ob-
served radio silence from Jan. 10
to Jan. 21, the officials said the
ship transmitted a routine radio
message on Jan. 20-three days
before her capture -- indicating
that she was outside North
Korea's 12-mile limit.
North Korea has demanded an
American admission that the
Pueblo violated Communist terri-
torial waters, an apology and, a
promise that it won't happen
again. The Communists say this
is a prerequisite for the crew's re-
lease.
Fifth Meeting
As Vance's plane headed to-
ward Seoul, a fifth secret meet-
ing at Panmunjom was under
way between U.S. Rear Adm.
John V. Smith, the U.N. com-
mander, and his North Korean
counterpart, Maj. Gen. Park
Choougkook, South Korean
sources said.

7
i

Three Senators Air Opinions
On Johnson's Vietnam Policy

NEWARK, N.J. uP) -- A special'
governor's commission on racial
disorders charged yesterday that:
state and local police and Na-
tional Guardsmen used "excessive
and unjustified force" against
Negroes in seeking to quell rioting
in Newark last July.
The blue ribbon commission
strongly condemned the role of
the police and city administra-
tion in handling the riots. It call-
ed for a special grand jury in-

extensive list of proposed reforms,' -Abolition of municipal courts
including recommendations to and transfer of their responsibili-
provide better housing and jobs ties to state courts which are
for poor Negroes. It called for "more politically insulated."
additional federal and state funds -Elimination of bail except
but said that vigorous initiative where "there is an unusual risk
on the part of private industry that the defendant will not return
would be essential as well. for trial."
It proposed a series of contro- The commission's report de-
versial reforms for police pro- scribed in detail what it called
cedures. anti-Negro "Prejudice" on the
Thecommission recommended: part of police and National
-More Negroes on the city po- Giardsmen.

Guard with Newark Brutality

vestigation of alleged corruption lice force.
in the city government headed by -Higher pay for college-edu-
Democratic Mayor Hugh J. Ad- cated policemen.
donizio. -A civilian police review board.
The commission's study was -A requirement that all uni-
authorized by Gov. Richard J. formed policemen wear name tags
Hughes, a Democrat. at all times while on duty.
There was no evidence to indi-
cate an organized conspiracy be-
hind the rioting, the commission
said. It contended that a long *I -E
history of social injustice reflect- MiKE
ed by deep-seated antagonism on
the part of Negroes toward police
was responsible for the disorders. ai
The commission said that wide-
spread violence in the nation'sDr
urban slums would have happen-
ed sooner "had not the Negro
been patient and' forbearing."
The commission said that "in: old-ti ev and
the long run law and order can'.
prevail only in conditions of social
justice." Sat. and Sun.
Hughes, in a statement, praised 8:00 p.m
the "extraordinary effort" dis-
played by the investigating com-
mission, but made no comment
on the report itself.
Addonizio suggested the report TB1 Bt
might cast Newark "in the role
of handy scapegoat-the terrible 330M
place where terrible people did
everything wrong."
He reserved further comment NEXT WEEK: JEREMY
pending' study of the full report.
The commission submitted an

The commission said it was
very "disturbed" that s e v e n
months after the riots there had
been no report of any disciplinary
action against police and Guards-
men who were charged with using
excessive force.

:ril

WASHINGTON (/P) - Sen. Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont.), said, yes-
cent days repeatedly has expres-
terday President Johnson in -e-
sed his full confidence in Gen.
C. Westmoreland's ability to cope
with a threatened new commun-
ist offensive at Khe Sanh.
Mansfield, the Senate Demo-
cratic leader, took note in an in-
terview of recent published re-
ports that Westmoreland might
soon be replaced as commander
in Vietnam, possibly by promotion
to Army chief of staff..
"The President has the fullest
confidence in Westmoreland and
has repeatedly told him so in re-
cent days," Mansfield said. "They
are very confident at the White
House that Khe Sanh can be
successfully defended."
Mansfield dismissed as false
rumors that the United States
might resort to the use of tactical
nuclear weapons if American
troops meet severe reverses at the
Marine stronghold in the north-
west corner of South Vietnam.
Previously, Chairman J. W. Ful-

bright, (D-Ark.), of the Senate
foreign relations committee had
written Secretary of State Dean
Rusk asking about reports that
tactical nuclear weapons had been
dispatched to South Vietnam.
The White House described as
false a statement attributed to
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, (D-
Minn.), that the President had
been requested to authorize the
use of such weapons in an emer-
gency. McCarthy is campaigning
as an antiwar candidate against
Johnson's, renomination.
McCarthy said in Miami, Fla.,
he hadn't made any such state-
ment.
Sen. Clifford Case, (R-N.J.),
a Foreign Relations Committee-
man, accused the Johnson admin-
istration of trying in Vietnam to

"justify as successes things that
they know are not success, for
political purposes."
"They are just so tied into this
thing they can't admit that they
are not doing well in South Viet-
nam," he said. "They had to take
even these recent unfortunate re-
sults of the campaign in the cities
against us as victories.
"By defining the goal of the
North Vietnamese as much more
than it apparently was, they say
the fact that they the Commun-
ists didn't do more than they did
do means that this was a great
victory.
"Well, it doesn't look like a
great victory to me, or will it to
the American people or to the
world, or to the boys who are
fighting out there." ,

--------"

I

One Seat Available
Joint Judiciary Counil.
Petitionis due Wednesday, Feb. 14

r _- -

9

GUILD HOUSE
---802 Monroe--.,
Monday, Feb. 12, Noon Luncheon, 25c
PROF. HENRY BRETTON, Dept. of Poli. Sci.:
"U.S. FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD
THE THIRD WORLD"

{
i

YOUING POETS
O- FESTIVAL
--.-TOMCLARK, RON PADGETT,
TED BERRIGAN
- February 11- 230 & 8:00
February 12: 4:00 & 8:00
February 13: 8:00
UNION ASSEMBLY ROOM

Pick up petitions in SGC offices

GIRLS ONLY

I

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Tues., Feb. 13, Noon Symposium (Lunch 25c)
STUART KARABENICK, Citizens for New Politics:
"POLITICAL PARTIES AND SOCIAL CHANGE"

, i
i
t
i

PRESENTS

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

No Admission

UAC

_1

MUSKET
S~eet
Ckarity
SOLiD OUT!

I

PRESENTS
trattorb
National Theatre of Canada
in
SHAKESPEARE'S
A Midsummer Night's Dream
with

I

"She doesn't look like
such a kid to"me.'

I

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

I

I

-

WALTI
WN
THE LiON
IN WiNTER
also STARRING
MARGARET PHILLIPS

UNION-LEAGUE

ll

VAN GOGH EXHIBIT

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania

at
TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART

Directed by JOHN HIRSCH

Designed by LESLIE HURRY

DIRECTED BY
MILTON KATZELAS

SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT !
..1 - 11 rFh l II"T"LI 1 .T _

LiA\t "rlIVc ull 1 A11nITnRI11M

,. - .u n s r w i n

I

I'. J ii
Buses will gun an Sundav. Februarv 18 +1

I|1

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