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February 11, 1968 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-11

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-I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN D AIL',

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5L \U AY, FEBRUARY 11, 1968

I

art
Versatility Marks Whistler Prints
By PETER VAN SCHAICK Rootless, never really at home
The famous Artist's Mother anywhere - even in London and
failed toshmowup at either of the Paris, where he spent most of his
two Whistler shows currently adulthood - he has been aptly
running in the midwest. However, termed the "continual expatri-
a liberal sprinkling of his relatives ate." Except for Henry James,k
do adorn the monumentaluexhi- Whistler was just about the only
bition at the Art Institute of American to receive widespread
Chicago. In the more modest-but European critical acclaim in the
still excellent-showing of forty- second half of the nineteenth,
nine prints now on exhibit at century.
UGLI in conjunction with the The exhibit at the UGLI is an .
Creative Arts Festival, mothers, effective demonstration that, on
relatives, and most colleagues are the basis of his graphic art alone,
absent. Whistler is an artist of very con- J.i-1
This exhibit, a judicious, care- siderable stature. In fact, he did
fully thought-out selection from not achieve wide recognition as-
the University Museum of Art's a painter until the 1890's, some
fine collection of Whistler prints, thirty years after he had made
is, displayed effectively. In con- his mark as an etcher' and lithog-s
trast to recent UGLI exhibits, in rapher.r-#
which pictures seemed to be. un- The show covers the full range %.
comfortably bunched together, of Whistler's career as a graphic
panels are limited to a single artist, from 1858 through the last:
print. years of the century. His first4
Whistler himself probably would efforts, a series of etchings ex-
have approved: he was one of the ecuted in 1858 called "The Frenchss5
first to insist that a gallery "fit Set," provided him with an en-
the show;" in his very first show tree into the Realist circle of
at the Flemish Gallery in 1874, Courbet and his friends (the gen-
he had the walls painted gray, erally low tonality of his paint-
introduced pots, flowers, and ing has been ascribed to the in-"p
bronzes, etc. fluence of this artist, to Manet,v
Two very minor flaws: several and to an inherited streak of
labels have fallen and at least his mother's puritanism as well). -
one panel is so badly warped that Two examples of this set are
it merits immediate replacement. present at the UGLI show. One of .
Notorious Arrogance them, A Kitchen, has a remark- v

Senators Fight Cuts

In Aid to Education Seeking Peace Talks

Thant Visits Moscow

WASHINGTON (P) - SenatorsI
concerned about President John-
son's cut in federal aid to educa-
tion far below congressional au-
thorizations are planning another
effort to try to reverse these de-
cisions.
Buttheir chances to get more
education money than the Presi-
dent allocated in his budget ap-
pear dim in the light of the econ-
omy mood on the Appropriations1
Committees.

But, Javits said, this hides "the
obvious factthat these deserving
programs have in general been
cut to the bone."
Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa.),
said he found the education budg-
et situation "very depressing."
"It indicates graphically what
the war in Vietnam is doing to
the Great Society," he said.
Administration budget officials
have said the bulk of the educa-
tion cuts are in bricks and mortar-j

MOSCOW (A)-With U.N. Sec-
retary General U Thant flying
into Moscow's high level diplo-
matic activity on Vietnam, today
informed sources say the Soviet
Union and Britain are wary of'
calling another Geneva confer-
ence.

ference to try to end the current
war. But in fact, the informants
hire said, bothBritain and the
Soviet Union want to be careful
they do not waste the potential
asset of a Geneva forum by call-
ing a meeting before everything is
ready.

Whistler, although born in the
United States (1834), spent most
of his life abroad. He was in
Russia during his early teens
(and "it was association with the
Russian nobility, according to
some biographers, that accounted
for the notorious arrogance dis-
played in later years). After a
decade back in the U.S., he re-
turned to Europe for good-except
for a brief swing through South
Ametica.

able affinity to the Dutch inter-
iors of Vermeer and DeHooch,
both of whom Whistler admired.
Black-White Contrasts
The "Thames Set" is a series of
etchings done the following year.
These prints, exercise in stark
black and white contrasts, are
the closest Whistler comes to de-
livering a strong left hook. They
give the impression- of being
finely detailed; yet, a closer look
reveals that individual details,

Close Looka construction funds for projects
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore.). which could be postponed.
chairman of the education sub- But the Senate subcommittee.,
committee which originated the members insist this is not the
authorizing legislation, told a re- ;case.
porter his panel will take a close s
look at the cuts.
Subcommittee members point j Athletes
to budget amounts sought under
two major education acts as ex-
amples of the heavy reductions R
recommended by Johnson. I
The 1965 Elementary and Sec- (Continued from Page 1)
ondary Education Act authorizes from promising summer jobs to
$3.7 billion in grants to school dis- prospective athletes.
tricts over the nation for fiscal MSU players get plenty of free
1969, beginning July 1. The Presi- tickets. A freshman told me he,
dent's budget asks for $1.7 bil- got two tickets to every home
lion, less than 50 per cent of the game. Sophomores get four tickets,
authorization, juniors got six tickets and seniors
An even deeper proportionate got eight tickets to home games.
cut was, made in the funds under The Big Ten rules say that the
the 1963 Higher Education Facil- athletic department can give a
ities Act. Johnson could have re- maximum of four tickets to juniors
quested $1.06 billion in fiscal 1969 and seniors and two to sophomores.
for aid to colleges and universities Freshman players aren't supposed
under this law, but instead put togtaytces
$236 million in his budget. togtayices
"There is no justification for When asked about MSU's allo-
shortchanging the education needs =ations of football tickets, Dorow
of this country when there is $79 ' . ,
billion in the budget for military the seniors get. I guess it's eight.
spending and additional billions I'm not quite sure. I do know that
for foreign aid," Morse said. it's been a set policy for the past
"Even putting aside the $25 two years."
billion for the war in Vietnam, Head Coach Duffy Daugherty
there is plenty of fat in the regu- has an unlisted telephone number
lar defense budget which could be and couldn't be reached for com-
used to make up these education ment. Neither Athletic Director
deficiencies." Clarence (Biggie) Munn nor As-
'Illusion' sistant Athletic Director J. Bert
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-N.Y.) Smith could be reached either.
said that the President, in his Dorow had the following com-
education message sent to Con- ment: "There's nothing wrong at
gress last week, "attempted to MSU, it's all in Ann Arbor. YouE
create the illusion of great prog- don't have the right to investigate
ress in meeting the domestic needs Michigan State, that's the job for
of the nation." the Big Ten and the NCAA."
I MADE TO ORDER

The two nations with author- As seen by diplomats here, Ha-
ity to summon a Vietnam peace noi and Washington remain too
conference in Geneva are afraid far apart for a call to guarantee
to issue a call prematurely that everyone's attendance now. But
would fail to get together all the diplomats were wondering this
warring elements, informants said weekend if the week's intense
yesterday, activity intMoscow might be shift-
There is no indication here that ing that situation.
either Hanoi or the Viet Cong, The activity began Monday, with
both of whose representatives have Kosygin talking to North Viet-
been busy in Moscow this week, namese Ambassador Nguyen Tho
want a peace conference now. Chan. The next day Kosygin talk-
Thant will be coming in around ed with U.S. Ambassador Llewel-
noon for a 29 hour visit to explore lyn E. Thompson. Vietnam was
the situation. understood to have been one of
From talks here with Premier the topics of the second meeting.
Alexei N. Kosygin, Thant will go On Wednesday the North Viet-
on to London tomorrow to see namese envoy saw Foreign Mi-
Prime Minister Harold Wilson. ister Andrey A. Gromyko. This
Britain and the Soviet Union followup suggested to diplomatic
provided co-chairmen for the 1954 observers that something was go-
Geneva conference that ended an ing on.
earlier round of Vietnamese war- Thursday 4was quiet in Moscow
fare. but Thant had a "useful talk" with
Publicly, Britain has urged re- , the North Vietnamese counsul in
convening of the Geneva con-' New Delhi.
THE URBAN FORUM I I
EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PLANNER
IN THE POLITICAL SYSTEM
A PUBLIC LECTURE by
ALAN ALTSHULER
Associate Professor of Political Science
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
February 12, 1968, 4:00 P.M.
Auditorium B, Angell Hall

-Courtesy, University Museum of Art
"Rotherhithe" (Wapping)
Etchinz (1860) from "The Thame ,,e"

a:.Vvuaug Nxovxj irviaa

I AlIC AILAIIJUb OUL I

such as bricks on a wall, are i the scenes he etched. Hence,
hardly discernable. A comparison everything is backwards, making
with four nearby-and far more it difficult to pinpoint exact loca-
impressionistic-lithotints of the tions.
same subject is extremely inter- Another curious thing: Whistler
esting and profitable.' liked to lay each newly printed
In 1880, Whistler was involved sheet on. the floor and re-work
in a libel suit with the English the shadows and other details in
critic John Ruskin. A strong ad- drypoint. Thus, such prints, al-
vocate of the Victorian notion though from the same plate, are
that art must either tell a story really variations on a given
or express some sort of sentiment theme. Two fine examples of this
or moral, Ruskin, in reference to are on display: The Doorway and
a painting called Falling Rocket I Tranghetto.
(inspired by a fireworks display Whistler, like so many artists,
and most simply described as yel- writers, and critics of his time,
low flocks of paint on a blue and was intensely concerned with the
black field) accused Whistler of relation of art and music. The
"flinging a pot of paint in the titles of most of his paintings
public's face." reflect this interest. The Artist's
Whistler, always careful to Mother, for example, is actually'
purge anecdote from his art, yet an Arrangement in Gray and
so eager to encourage and culti- Black. Others were titled Sym-,
vate it when it concerned his pub- phony, Variation, Nocturne, 'etc.
lic image, responded by suing in a stated combination of colors.
Ruskin. Whistler won the case but The prints, curiously enough,
had to pay costs. are rarely given such titles.
Near bankruptcy, he returned Subtle, low-keyed, often spontan-
to Italy in 1880 and began the eous but never lacking an accom-
first of his "Venice Sets," ten of plished sense of structure, these
which are on view here. These prints, however, generate their
show a marked impressionist sen- own delicate music.
sibility (it was Whistler, in fact, Top marks to Susan Rice, grad-
who was principally responsible uate assistant at the University
for introducing impressionism in Museum of Art and co-ordinator
England) and a close relationship of the show. The exhibit will run
with the intimistes. until March 3.
Unlike most artists who visit And in case you tire of Whistler
Venice, Whistler was unconcerned prints, a good change of pace is
with accurately recording the dis- on permanent e x h i b i t right
tinctive landmarks of the city, so around the corner: Tom Mc

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-Courtesy, University Museum of Art
"Becquet" (The Fiddler)
Etching (1871) from "The Thames Set"
1U

unconcerned in fact that he didn't Clure's Aura, gift of the class of
even take the trouble to reverse 1958.

I

HERE IT IS ...
TheL Long Awaited
W. C. FIELDS
Film Festivol

"LIKE A PUNCH IN THE CHEST. PUT
TOGETHER BREATH BY BREATH,
LOOK BY LOOK, LUST BY LUST,
LIE BY LIE. A COMPELLING FILM:'
-Newsweek Magazine
WINNER TWO CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS

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The Joseph Losey
Production of
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Screenplay by
H-arold Pinter
Directed by
Joseph Losey
In Color

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Director, Andrej Wajda, 1958
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