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February 07, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-07

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7,1968

THE MICHIGAN D,4ILV

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNSDA, FBRUAY 7196 THEMICIGA DAIY PGE EV1

Behind Closed Doors
BOB McFARLAND
About this time of the year, I'm normally in the most desperate
of moods. I'm cursing the fact that I ever decided to attend college4
in a climate that with a little imagination, seems worse than that of
Nome Alaska. I'm staring umpteen midterms and papers in the face,
knowing that the knowledge I've accumulated since the semester be-7
gan would hav trouble filling the flysheet of my favorite textbook.
Add to that the cynicism, skepticism, and the lack of faith in almost
everything that always reaches a personal peak during the month of
February.
I just can't find much to cheer about.
Before going any further, let me say that I'm not writing this with
the intent of depressing everyone. Rather, I want to tell about my
renewed faith in the month of February.
Only yesterday, the restoration occurred. Ann Arbor was en-
joying one of those brief winter respites, the mercury soaring close
to the 50-degree mark. The Michigan cagers had finally won
w another Big Ten game, proving that the better team stil can
win a contest, and those heralded high school All-America recruit-
ments of almost three years past have begun recently to play the
part. And this University's Board of Regents had passed the first
major revision of Chapter XXIX of its Bylaws in a quarter of a
century.
I'm sure the first two events bolstered the dikes holding back
the troubled mental waters of many a Michigan student. The third
event and the most portentous probably needs some explanation.
You see, Chapter XXIX of the Regent's Bylaws concerns the Depart-
ment of Physical Education and Athletics. Like many state con-
stitutions, these governing provisions aren't altered to any significant
degree very often.
Monday was one of those 'rare occasions. The Regents created
two positions. an AssociateAthletic Directorfr Intercollegiate
Athletics. and an Associate Athletic Director for Physical Educa-
tion (and presumably intramurals). Equally important in my mind
was the establishment of an Advisory Board that will concern
itself with the flagging problem areas of student recreation, intra-
murals, and club sports.
The Advisory Board, if constituted along those lines suggested
by the President's Athletic Advisory Review Committee, will have sub-
* stantial student representation, and hopefully provide the bargaining
voice which intramurals has so desperately lacked in the University
community over the past decade
The weather "happened" yesterday. The creation of the Ad-
visory Board didn't "happen," however. It wasn't as if the Regents
all woke up Monday morning with the collective brainstorm that
intramurals were in terrible shape, and rushed into emergency
N deliberations to find the solutions. The establishment of that
Boards was a grinding, plodding process, like three-yards-and-a-
cloud-of-dust, that stretched over weeks, months, and years.
By the time of Monday's announcement, there were several groups
pushing for an improvement in the intramural program at Michigan
who had never even considered the problem two years before. I thank
them for their efforts. and their receptivity to a glaring deficiency in
* a University that prides itself on total excellence.
The people who really deserve the acknowledgement, however
are those that started the outcry, those that foresaw the dim
future of student recreation at Michigan when the program started
to take a turn for the worse, some 10 or even 15 years ago. (Archi-
tectural plans were drawn up for a new IM building as far back
as 1951.) These made up, as one administrator so aptly put it,
the voices crying out in wilderness.
John Telfer, University Planner, was one, of these "voices." He be-
came concerned about the lack of fields and recreational facilities
as early as seven or eight years ago, and has pressed consistently for
improvements, often, it must have seemed, in near isolation. Earl
Riskey and Dr. Rodney Grambeau, Director and Associate Director of
Intramurals, also deserve commendations for their worl. Closest to
the deterioration, they witnessed the tragic metamorphosis of a dia-
mond into a pieca of coal.
William L. Stuede, Director of Student-Community RelatIions,
and his assistant, Dr. Peter Ostafin, have my special thanks for
the many hours they spent on a problem that was not really their
responsibility. They took the risk of stepping on some people's toes,
prepared two studies on the recreational situation, and in general
provided the needed staff work that is helping the program climb
back on its feet.
I commend that much-maligned Vice-President Dr. Richard
Cutler for, along with his staff members, taking much of the initiative
that led to the realization of the decay.
No matter how immodest it may appear, it is also necessary to
state that The Daily played a large part in exposing the deficiencies.
So I also include those members of the sports staff who spent large
portions of their time writing articles and gathering information, along
with Chuck Vetzner, Sports Editor in 1966-67, who provided the im-
petus behind The Daily campaign.
We may have devoted an inordinated amount of space to the
issue. One former staffer, no longer living in Ann Arbor, reported
that he felt like switching on the news to see how many people
had been killed when he read our coverage on the collapse of the
IM pool roof.
But the first step was -taken this week on the long road back to
respectability in intramurals.
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U.S. Icers

Fall

in

Olmpic

Debut,

5-1

GRENOBLE, France (R) - The
United States dropped the first
match of the hockey competit-
ion, losing to Czechoslovakia 5-1
on the opening day of the Winter
Olympics.
More significant for the Games,
however, was the compromise
reached several 'hours later be-
tween the International Olympic
Committee and the International
Ski Federation in the ski-trade
mark controversy.
The IOC, which had wanted all
manufacturers' names removed
GRENOBLE (P) - Winter
Olympics visitors will kindly,
stick to skating, skiing, hockey,
bobsledding and toboganning
and refrain from back seat
driving.
The French have pasted no-
tices inside the vehicles used to
transport athletes, officials and
newsmen from place to place
requesting that passengers "do
not comment to the driver on
his driving."
from skies of competitors, ruled
after a lengthy session that ski-
ing would remain in the Grenoble
Olympics but that no skier would
be permitted to show any trade-
marks on his skis at the end of
a run.
The decision appeared to be ac-
cepted by the IOC of a com-
promise formula proposed by FIS
to leave the trademarks on but
to make sure the skiers do not
display their equipment to photo-
graphers and television cameras.
The 10C is opposed to skis
bearing trademarks because it
feels this practice is a commercial
exploitation of the Olympics.
FIS first agreed to have the
skiers eliminate the brand names
but then changed its decision, ar-
guing that paint or wax used to
coverthe names might.unbalance
the skis.
The compromise eliminated the
possibility of the ski events being
crossed off the Olympic program
and being reduced to world cham-
pionships.
Tomorrow's Events
The world's top girl figure skat-
ers went through' their compul-
sory-figure practice routine for
the last time yesterday before
competition for the Olympic title
begins in earnest today.
World champion Peggy Flem-
ing of Colorado Springs, Colo., as
usual looked best in the intricate
but unspectacular exercise which
still accounts for 60 per cent of
the pointsntotal in international
competition.
Russia's defending Olympic
champions crushed Finland 8-0
and Canada's strong team routed
West Germany 6-1

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Hiockei
By DIANA ROMANCHUXC
"Road trips will either make or1
break a team."
Michigan hockey coach Al
Renfrew made that comment last
week following a two-game series
in Minnesota, where double wins
had moved the Wolverines into
fourth place in the WCHA stand-
ings.
But there were still three more
road gamesstraight to go.
"After the two-game series inI
Duluth (Minnesota), we'll know
whether we can keep up the mo-
mentum we have going," the coach
continued.
That series down, the momentum
still holds. Not only are the Wol-
verine icers in the midst of an
eight-game winning streak, but
they have edged into the third
spot in the WCHA.
The league leading Michigan
Tech Huskies, two wins and one

Hopes

High a t Midseason

loss ahead of Michigan, arrive in
two weeks to test the invincibility
of Wolverine home ice - Michigan
remains undefeated in the Col-
iseum this season.
Michigan's league record stands
at 7-3, all three, of course, losses
coming on the road. The first two,
against now second-placed Den-
ver, opened the Wolverine's WCHA
season.
The remaining defeat - nine
games ago - came against the
Spartans of Michigan State. A re-
turn engagements set for this
Friday night.
The battle for scoring leader-
ship is as much a scramble as
the WCHA race. As Coach Ren-
frew observed, "We don't have
any 'star' players - we're a team
effort."
The "team" has been spreading
the scoring out with no one player
leading all the time. Senior Bruce

Koviak and junior Doug Galbraith
have alternated the leadership
most of the season.
Originally, sophomore Dave Per-
rin surged into the lead with two
consecutive hat tricks in the open-
ing exhibition games against Me-
Master. But he ran into a few
bouts with the flu bug as well as
a back injury which has not stop-
ped but hampered his playing.
Perrin now stands fifth with 16
goals and 4 assists.
Galbraith took over, recently
relinquishing the lead to Koviak,
who has the most hat tricks with
three. However, the junior for-
ward regained the lead last week-
end in Duluth and now heads
the pack with 13 goals and 14 as-
sists for 27 points. Koviak trails
by one point, accounting for 14
goals and 12 assists.
Senior Lee Marttila, who sat
out the first six games, is third
with 25 points (14 goals, 11 as-
sists); Ron Ulloyt ranks fourth
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
ROBIN WRIGHT

with 11 goals and 11 assists total-
ing 22 points.
Randy Binnie and defenseman
Lars Hansen, singled out by Ren-
frew as the two most improved
players, are tied in sixth place
with 20 points each. Binnie has
11 goals and 9 assists, to Han-
sens' 3 and 17.
The mainstay of the team, of
course, has been goalie Jim
Keough. The junior has been in

the net for all except the second
Western Ontario game, when
H a r o 1 d Herman took over.
Keough's often spectacular goal-
tending has kept Michigan in
many a close game.
All in all, at midseason things
are looking up for the Wolverine
hockey team despite a rough road
ahead. But, in the words of coach
Renfrew, "We'll play each game
as it comes."

Attend thi

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THURS. 9-8

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I

Illini Inch Closer to First
With Victory over Badgers,

KIWANIS ACTIVITY CENTER
Washington & First Sts.
FURNITURE-. BOOKS - CLOTH ING
HARDWA RE - SHOES, etc.
All Proceeds for Kiwanis Charities
--

I'

MADISON, Wis. (R) - Illinois'
surprising Illini parlayed a stingy
defense and a 19-point effort by
Dave Scholz for a 68-60 Big Ten
basketball victory over Wisconsin
last night.
The Illini, who upped their con-
ferencerecord to 4-1, overcame a
Wisconsin lead midway in the
first half on a layup by Jodie
Harrison for a *19-18 margin and
never relinquished the lead.
When the Badgers threatened
to overtake Illinois in the final
two minutes, Harrisonhcalmly
sank two free throws to give his
team a 63-56 edge.
The loss was Wisconsin's third
in six conference games, and its
seventh in 16 starts. Wisconsin's
60-point output was its second

lowest of the season.
Badger senior Joe Franklin led
all scorers with 23 points. Slump-
ing Chuck Nagle, last year's high
scorer, was held to two points.
Illinois, under new coach Harv
Schmidt, checkednthe fast-break-
ing Badger offense early in the
second half with slow-down tac-
tics.
The partisan crowd of 10,094
booed the Illini- during a stall
which lasted nearly two minutes
while the Illini maintained a 39-
33 advantage.
The Badgers pulled to within
three points, 34-31, shortly before
the end of the first half. Illinois
then ripped off five straight
points to snare a 39-31 halftime
lead.
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A YEAR AT TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY
1968-1969
An accredited program open to qualified American stu-
dents interested in exploring the various aspects of life
in Israel while earning academic credit.
Programs For: JUNIOR YEAR -:- FRESHMAN YEAR
Scholarships Available
For Further nformation Contact:
The Secretary for Academic Affairs
The American Friends of the Tel Aviv University, Inc.
41 East 42d Street
New York, N.Y. 10017 MU 7-5651

,4i

j
i

Big Tell Standings

1

Ohio State
Illinois
Northwestern
Iowa
Purdue
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Indiana
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

W
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
1
1

L
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
4
5
6

Pct.
.833
.800
.667
.667'
.600
.500
.500
.333
.167
.143

Electrifying Opportunities'
at Southern California Edison~
Electrical Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Civil Engineers
Chemical Engineers
Thermonuclear Engineers

Looking for an
engineering career
in Optics?
Set your sights
on AC Electronics.
We're looking for individuals with engineering or physics
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ELECTRO-OPTICAL ENGINEER-You'll be involved in the testing and
evaluation of a multipurpose, stabilized zoom telescope used in tactical
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German design. Some foreign travel may be involved. BS/MS in Optics, EE, or
Physics (with course work or major in optics area).
OPTICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEER-You'll be on the team charged with
testing and evaluating a specialized low light level television night viewing
device; a direct view image intensification night viewing device of German
design; a device to protect personnel from flash blindness by nuclear weapons.
miilit of eime forein travel. BS/MS Physics. BSEE, and MS Physics.

C

Come live and work with us in
Southern California. Aside from the
. fact that Southern California is the
advanced technology capital of the
world, we'd also like to mention that
the weather is great, sports and enter-
tainment are unlimited, and all the
girls are beautiful.
Now about us. We're just complet-
ing our first major nuclear station,
the 450,000 kw capacity San Onofre
facility. It will be the largest in the U.S.
when it completes the check-out phase
and goes on line.
We have more nuclear stations in
the planning stages, including a combi-
nation electric power and desaliniza-
tion plant.
We're doing lots of work in EHV.
transmission, too. And we're looking
even further ahead to direct conversion
methods: thermionics, thermoelectrics,
and magnetohydrodynamics.
Grow With Us
'Cn i yr. A ri"A n .. o .n ...,:n.

pace with the electrical demands of
Southern and Central California. By
1975, we'll also have doubled our total
plant and equipment investment to
more than five billion dollars. And
we'll probably have to double again in
the eight years after that. We need top
engineering talent. Electrical engi-
neers, mechanical engineers, civil
engineers, chemical engineers, and
thermonuclear engineers.
Master's Program
We offer good starting salaries and
opportunities for rapid advancement.
Our master's program will pick up the1
bills for you if you want to work toward
an advanced degree while employed at
Edison.
If you're interested in advancing
the state of the art in the generation,
transmission and distribution of elec-
tricity, check with your placement
office regarding Edison's visit on cam-
pus. Or write: F. J. Ofsanko, Southern
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I

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