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February 07, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-07

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1968

PAOE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7,1968

Practice Means Records for Peruvian Bello

By CINDY LEATHERMAN
It may look easy folks, but
there's a lot more to swimming
than just paddling around the old
pool. "I think swimming is hard,
but you have to keep going," re-
arked Juan Bello, who daily
puffs his way through two hours
of practice at Matt Mann Pool.
Bello (pronounced Bayo), a
sophomorepontheteam, special-
izes in the individual medley.
Against Michigan State this year,
he bettered Carl Robie's team
record (as Robie watched from
the stands) in the 200-yard in-
dividual medley with a 2:00.27.
And just last Saturday at Minne-
sota, he set a pool record in the
'200-yard freestyle with a 1:45.5-
one of the top times nationally as
well.
It was the first time he's swum
the 200 this year-practice does
pay.

Bello is from Lima, Peru, and
started swimming at a very early
age. "My father taught me how to
swim when I was four. He's a
pilot and we lived at the base
where they had a pool about fif-
teen yards in length.
It was really hot there - about
95-100 degrees every day-and he
thought maybe we'd want to
jump in. At first, I couldn't even
swim one lap. The problem was
I didn't breathe - I was scared
Df drinking water."
Bello learned the essentials of
breathing real fast, and from his
first introduction to the water,
he loved it. When he was eight,
his father took him to the swim-
mling club in Lima. "The first day
the coach made me swim against
his best swimmer who was two
years older than I. He beat me only#
by a touch - I guess I wasI
pretty good."

It was at this same club that
Eddie Bartsch, captain of the 1965
Michigan swim team, was teaching
in the summer of 1966. He and
Steve Clark, a Yale graduate and
Olympic swimmer who was serv-
ing as assistant coach, were both
impressed with the young swim-
mer.
Bartsch wrote Michigan coach
Gus Stager, who in turn immed-
iately wrote Bello. "I heard about
Juan first from Steve who was
down in South America with the
Peace Corps,"reflected Stager.
"But I don't know if we would
have encouraged him to come to
Michigan if he hadn't been so
highly recommended byEd Bart-
sch. It takes a person with a very
strong character from that coun-I
try to make it here."
Stager went on to explain. "For
a South American, he's making
a tremendous adjustment in all
respects. In South America, as

in Europe, the concept of athletics
is completely reVersed. All of our
sports are team-oriented, whereas
in Juan's country, the emphasis is
on the individual. It's the single
athlete who excels, not the team
itself."
Besides Michigan, Bello had of-
fers to swim with Stanford and
Berkley. When asked why he chose
the Wolverines, Bello didn't hes-
itate. "I decided to come because
Carl Robie was here." Coach Sta-
ger was well aware of Bello's ad-
miration for the Michigan cham-
pion. "Carl was his ideal - it
was almost hero worship."
Going Home
Bello has been swimming and
winning for his country for quite
awhile. "I've represented my
country in many meets - since I
was eleven." He's planning to go
back to Brazil following the Indi-
ana meet this Saturday. It will be
his first homecoming since he
came to school in 1966. There he
will represent his country in the
South American games.
But the most important com-
petition? "I will be scared when
the time comes, I'm not scared
'now. I'm hoping to do something
great in Mexico."
He will have to miss a good
deal of school, though. Stager ex-
pressed his concern. "He's the
greatest swimmer they have down
there. And this is going to be a
problem - not necessarily missing
the swimming meets here, but
missing school."
Right now though, Bello is not
concerned about next year's aca-
demic situation - he's too busy
keeping in shape for his rigorous
schedule. When he first arrived,
he explains, "Gus said I was too

By Bill McFall
Days of Ropes
And Yo-Yos
The dark hulk that is the IM Building shelters its freshmen
from the outside as they slip and slide over the wet floor on their
way to a B-minus in competitive tennis.
On the outside, one finds the third of three days of cloudless,
deep-blue sky; body temperatures that rise in direct proportion to
air temperature as nature's miracle malady takes hold.

k

0

The front page of a recent Daily kites along and is arrested
by the concrete immobility of a diag bench.
News from the World of Sport: one reads, "Because the athletic
department can no longer provide for intramurals . . . we will have
to find different avenues," a statement from President Fleming.
As necessity inspires invention, the students occupying the sunny,
melted outside find their own "avenues".
In front of the library, a cigarette smoking member of an or-
ganization identified on a tag as AlphaEpsilonPhiSigmaDelta hawks
yo-yos (or is it yos-yo?) for the benefit of the American Cancer
Society. As he puffs away, the thought occurs that cancer cures,
smoking.
When they run out of yo-yos, they start selling a neat little
thing, with a ball on a string, that you try to swing into a cup.

- i l

! I

ONCE

FESTIVAL

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+

ELECTRONIC MUSIC THEATER

Thurs., Feb. 8
ONCE GROUP

Fri., Feb. 9 Sat., Feb. 10 Michigan Union Ballroom
ONCE GROUP SONIC. ARTS GROUP (N.Y.) 8:30 P.M.

(Repeated performance-
Audience limited)

$2.00 Students/$1.50. . . at MICHIGAN UNION, DISCOUNT RECORDS,
in cooperation with the UM Creative Arts Festival
CENTICORE BOOK SHOP and PLASTER OF PARIS (Maynard Street)
-- -~ --

II

3

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QUICK

TONIGHT!

-Daily-Bernie Baker
JUAN BELLO, the Wolverines' individual medley star, is showing
his perfect form in the freestyle-so perfect, in fact, that he's got
his hand between the camera and his face.
Against Minnesota, the sophomore swam the 200-yard freestyle,
a secondary event for him, and had the best time in the nation
this season.
skinny. He made me swim really good in this respect -he can push
hard." and endure."
Stager still thinks he's too thin. Bello appreciates Stager's hard-
"He's an awfully hard worker, so work approach. "I think he's a
any wei-lac h might gain, he really good coach. He has swim-
hard - he's learned to hurt and mers from high school who aren't
loses in practice. He swims very ,really that good, and he makes
endure hurt. The great swimmers, them good."
as they swim, learn their thres- At the present time, Bello is'
hold of tolerance. Juan is really in education, but concerning his
----- -___ major, "That's a bad question. I
,don't know what I can do."
He knows what he can do in
the water, though. "I think that
do is work hard. You don't have
to be big and strong, but you must
in swimming, the only thing to
have the desire."
It probably helps, though, if
season was the highest of his ' you're big and strong. Bello works
career. out at least thirteen hours every
*k * *week. In whatever spare time he
KANSAS CITY - CHARLEY has, "I sleep, I study," and he eats
METRO, former Chicago Cubs candy. "I love candy . . . I like
manager and a super scout for sweet things."
Cincinnati last year, was named Bu
yesterday as director of player aBello is very sure of hie
perreen for Kansas City's new and believes any good athlete
American League 1969 expansion should know his own capacity and
club. must possess the strictestself-dis-
e e j cipline. "There's no luck in swim-
BALTIMORE - The birthplace I ming - there's no luck in any
of baseball immortal B A B E sport. "I't all skill."
RUTH, saved from demolition in How long will Bello be swim-
December, was turned over to the ming? I'm swimming until I can't
city of Baltimore yesterday to be win anything more for my country.
preserved as a shrine. I don't think I've done anything
The transfer of title was made yet."
on the 73rd birthday of the Balti- If that's true, we can expect
mnore incorrigible who became some pretty spectacular things
baseball's greatest slugger and from the young Peruvian ... and
gate attraction. The Babe died of we shouldn't have to hold our
cancer in 1948. breath for very long.

The purchasers wind strings, tie slipknots, and stroll happily
away, impressing coeds in spring jackets who finally drift off in
pairs and trios to discuss lost days of "Mabel, Mabel, set the table ..
metered to the steady thwack of a worn jump rope.
Others do an impromptu hopscotch down one of the arterial
sidewalks that lead to the fishbowl.
Between classes, four boys, a bat, anda ball form a Pepper
game in the grassy confines of neatly hung chains.
Off on a side street continues the immortal game of catch with
a football. What ever happened to the Frisbees of not-so-long ago?
And tennis rackets are the weapons with which a few assault
Palmer Field, where a short time ago the non-hibernators created for
themselves an icy avenue.
Four mouths gape in unison on the golf course by Island Park
as the ball hits a shaded frozen spot and bounds off in unchecked
flight toward a river that-now rests in eddying repose over the sixth
green. (Winter rules: one stroke penalty, and sort of play like the
seventh was the sixth.)
And all is spontaneity as student sport temporarily finds its
own avenues, until snow again covers the sidewalks and salt trucks:
drifting over a groundhog's shadow.

'I

##

I

Pr of. Robert Beckley
sm . Registered architect and Assistant Pro-
0 ~ fessor of Architecture in the Archi-
) tecture and Design School, Professor
Beckley will speak, on
- "The Cultural Evolution"
Wednesday, February 7
8 :0,0 - R ackham Amphitheatre

ST. LOUIS - TONY ROCHE
of Australia defeated EARL
"BUTCH" BUCHHOLZ of St.
Louis yesterday 31-27 and 31-23,
but the United States team retain-
ed a 3-1 edge over the Aussies in
the World Cup tennis finals.
PITTSBURGH - The Pitts-
burgh Pirates announced yester-
day that slugging star ROBERTO
CLEMENTE has signed his 1968
contract. The highest paid playerI
in Pirate history, he reportedly
signed for $100,000 for the second
straight year.
Clemente, who won his fourth
National League batting title in
1967, will be starting his 14th sea-
son with the Pirates. He was the
league's most valuable player in
1966 and his .357 average last

I-

This Week in Sports
Thursday
GYMNASTICS-Michigan at Michigan State.
Friday
HOCKEY-Michigan at Michigan State.
Saturday
BASKETBALL-Iowa in Events Building, 1:30 p.m.
HOCKEY-Michigan State at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
WRESTLING-Ohio State in Events Building, 3:30 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Michigan at Ohio State,
SWIMMING-Michigan at Indiana.
TRACK-Michigan State Relays at East Lansing.

I

4

4

UAC

NO ADMISSION

mommmommommummmommmom

Monday
WRESTLING-Michigan at Wisconsin.

Hughes announces new
openings on the.
TECHNICAL STAFF.

Thursday, February 8,
explore an
engineering career
on earth's
last frontier.
Talk with Newport News On-Campus Career Con-
sultant about engineering openings at world's
largest shipbuilding company-where your future
is as big as today's brand new ocean.
Our half-a-billion-dollar backlog of orders means high start-
ing salary, career security, with your way up wide open.
It also means scope for all your abilities. We're involved
with nuclear ship propulsion and refueling, nuclear aircraft
carrier and submarine building, marine automation. We've
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equipment. We're starting to apply our nautical nuclear
know-how to the fast expanding field of nuclear electric
power generation. We're completing competitive systems
designs for the Navy's $1 billion plus LHA fleet concept.
Interested in an advanced degree or research? We're next
door to Virginia Associated Research Center with one of
the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, offering advanced
study in high energy physics. We're close to Old Dominion
College and University of Virginia Extension Division, where
you can get credits for a master's degree, or take courses
in Microwave Theory, Solid State Electronics, Nuclear En-
gineering and other advanced subjects. Ask about scholar-
ships, tuition grants, study and research leaves to imple-
rnent these opportunities.
Ask, too, about the pleasant living and rower living costs,
here in the heart of Virginia's historic seaside vacation land,
with superb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.
IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS

ADMIN. TRAINEE
COLLEGE GRADUATE
WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE IMAGINATIVE BUSINESS OR
LIBERAL ARTS GRADUATE WHO WANTS THE CHALLENGE
OF' A CAREER IN PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATION DEAL-
ING WITH PERSONNEL. SALARY ADMINISTRATION, EX-
PENSE, AND PROCESSING CONTROLS.
IF YOU ARE A RECENT COLLEGE GRADUATE OR A GRAD
RETURNING FROM MILITARY SERVICE AND ARE INTER
ESTED IN A SALARIED TRAINING PROGRAM, PLEASE CALL
MR. BALES OR MR. PFAFF
THE TRAVELERS
961-8240-Area Code 313
We Are an Equal Opportunity Employer M and F

Assignments exist for Engineers
graduating in 1967 with B.S.,
M.S. and Ph.D degrees in
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
HUGHES-FULLERTON Engineering
Laboratories assignments range from
research to hardware development
and operational support of productsi
and systems in the field. Our current
activities involve the advanced tech-
nologies of phased-array frequency-
scanning radar systems, real-time
general purpose computers, displays,
data processing, satellite and surface
communications systems, surface-to-
air missile systems, and tactical air
weapons command/control systems.
For additional information on the
opportunities offered at HUGHES-
FULLERTON in Southern California-

Join The DailySportsStaff
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Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Marine Engineers
Industrial Engineers
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Naval Architects
Nuclear Engineers
Civil Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers

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