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February 06, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY $ ' 1968

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE E

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,1988 THE MICHIGAN DAIlY PAflK WINK

it

BREAK LOSING STRING
Cagers Streak Past Minnesota, 113-01

By RICK STERN
Associate Sports Editor

1

*

*

*

*

*

*

Hitting 58 per cent from the
floor and 80 per cent from the
line, Dave Strack's rapidly im-
proving Wolverines won their first
Big Ten game in more than a
year, drowning hapless Minnesota
113-101 last night.
It was the first conference win
o ever for Michigan in the new
Events Building and also the first
since February 4th of 1967, when
they beat Purdue 86-74.
The win pushed the Wolverines
over the Gophers into ninth place.
Michigan is 1-5 on the season,
Minnesota now 1-6.
' Hustle Helps
The Wolverines, led by the
backcourt hustle of .guards Jim
Pitts and Ken Maxey, forced
Minnesota into 12 first half turn-
overs, enough for a 58-52 inter-
mission separation. Pitts had 19
points in the first 20 minutes, in-
cluding seven of nine from the
foul, line and six of eight from
the field.
It wasn't the first time in the
past 14gamesthat Michigan has
had a lead, but it was the first
time that they cushioned It' in-
stead of dissipating it. It was the
hot hand of Dennis Stewart that
put the margin over ten after
Just three minutes of the second
half. In a ninety second span the
Pennsylvania junior put through
three straight 15-footers to render
sterile the zone' the Gophers had
employed to try and keep Pitts
and Bob Sullivan off the baseline.
For the rest of the game 6'7"

Houston Margin Cut in Poll;
Ionaventure Moves into Fourth
By The Associated Press I Mississippi and Mississippi State. 1 1. Houston (25) 20-0 322

-Daily-Anita Kessler
MICHIGAN'S JUNIOR GUARD, Ken Maxey, breaks past
Minnesota's Mike Regenfuss to drop in two during the Wol-
verine's wide open battle last night. The Blue overpowered the
Gophers 113-101. Maxey contributed 10 points during the fray.

The UCLA Bruins have cut
Houston's first-place margin to a
mere eight points in the latest
Associated Press weekly major-
college basketball poll. New Mex-
ico State is the only newly-rated
team.
The unbeaten Cougars collected
25 first-plave votes to UCLA's
eight in the voting by a national
panel of 34 sports writers and
broadcasters based on games
through last Saturday.
However, on a point basis,
Houston leads the Bruins by only
.322 to 314. The Cougars drew
eight votes for second place while
UCLA had 26 for the No. 2 spot.
Points were awarded on a basis
of 10 for a first-place vote, 9 for
second et.
Texas at El Paso, 11-4, received
the other vote for the top spot,
but did not gain a position in the
Top Ten.
North Carolina held third place
followed in order by St. Bonaven-
ture, Tennessee, New Mexico, Co-
lumbia, Kentucky, Vanderbilt and
New Mexico State.
Houston beat Fairfield 108-76
and Marshall 102-93 last week,
lifting its record to 20-0. UCLA,
16-1 downed Southern California,
101-67. North Carolina boosted its
mark to 14-1 by defeating Florida
State and Maryland.
St. Bonaventure maintained its
undefeated slate in recording its
16th victory. The Bonnies beat
Villanova, 66-62, and moved up
one place to fourth.
Tennessee also advanced one
position to fifth after defeating

New Mexico slipped two notches
to sixth. The Lobos' 17-game un-
beaten string was ended by Ari-
zona, 69-68..
The Top Ten, with first-place
votes in parenthese, season rec-1
ords through games of Sat. Feb.1
3 and total points on a 10-9-8-7-
6-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

UCLA (8)
North Carolina
St. Bonaventure
Tennesee
New Mexico
Columbia
Kentucky
Vanderbilt
New Mexico Sta

16-1
14-1
16-1
14-2
17-1
13-3
13-4
14-4
ate 17-2

314
263
202
180
158
91
77
47
44

Buckeyes Buzzer Victory
V
Nips Indiana Comeback

Tomjanovich took over,

often

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Research'
Laboratory
WASHINGTON, D.C.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
The Navy's Corporate Laboratory-NRL is
engaged in research embracing practically
all branches of physical and engineering sci-
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The Laboratory has a continuing need for
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Candidates for bachelor's, master's and doc-
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FEBRUARY 12,1K
Those who for any reason are unable to
schedule interviews may write to The Direc-
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tory, Washington, D. C. 20390.

Oops, A Wir
MICHIGAN

Stewart, f
Sullivan, f
Fraumaflf, c
Pitts, g
Maxey, g
Tomjanovich.
Henry, I
McClellan, f
Edwards, c,
Bloodworth,
Montross
Lawson, c
Totals
Ml
Overske, f
Mikan, f
Mikan,
Kondla, c
Gardner, g
Nuness, g
Scheiper, g
Barry, g
Moore, f
Fitzimmons,
Proeschez, f
Beyer, f
Team

FG FT R
10-15 5-5 8
7-12 0-0 2
1-1 0-1 4
9-15 8-11 3
8-5 0-0 4
c 11-21 8-9 6
1-3 2-2 0
1-3 0-0 4
f 0-0 0-0 2
g 0-0 0-0 0
g 0-0 0-1 0
0-0 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0
45-78 23-29 41
I NNESOTA
5-8 3-5 6
5-8 3-5 6
4-6 2-2 5
13-30 4-7 13
7-16 6-7 10
7-13 2-2 7
0-2 0-0 0
2-3 4-5 2
0-1 0-0 0
f 0-1 0-0 1
0-0 0-1 0
2-2 0-0 0
40-84 21-28 49

T
25
14
2
26
10
30
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
113
13
13
10
30
20
16
0
8
0
0
0
4
101

matching the Gophers basket for
basket. He had 22 tallies in the
second half, and tied for game
high man with 30, including eight
of nine from the line.
Sullivan and Kenny Maxey
didn't miss either. Sullivan fouled
out unhappily With 12:35 left in
the game, but not before he had
put through seven of 12 high
archers. On his fourth foul the
red-faced, temperamental former
high school great protested a little
too vehemently and was called for
a technical foul.
Maxey, in addition to his high-
handed backcourt thievery, hit
five out of eight from the field,
and was very close on the other
downcourt for fast-break lay-ups
after a steal.
Minnesota's center Tom Kond-
la, who killed the Wolverines in
Minneapolis last year, was dan-
gerous again and dominated the
Gopher offense, making 13 of 30
shots from the floor. He finished
with 30 points.
Gophers Inept
But when the pressure came on
them late in the game, the Go-
phers were inept. They trailed by
Just 10 during most of the middle
ten minutes of the second half,
but could never build the momen-

tum to cut the gap.
In the last five minutes the1
Wolverine lead soared, and was
111-91 when the Strack began to
empty his bench.
Sipping a coke after the game,
with a "how sweet it is" sign
chalked on the blackboard, Strack
bore the look of a man relieved
of a burden or two. "It's hard to
believe we went a year without
winning. We're still pretty far
down, but I can't help feeling
elated. I think we've played hard-
er games than we did tonight, es-
pecially defensively, but I think
we ran our offense as well as we
ever have.
Sullivan Pleasing
Strack was especially cheered
by Sullivan's performance. "Did
you see him spot the open man
at the post? And what about Pitts{
and Maxey on the press? They
are good at that!"
The shooting percentages were
the highest in many years for a
Strack-coached outfit. Stewart
hit 10 of fifteen altogether, in
perhaps the finest display of dead
accuracy since his high school
days. Tomjanovich with 11 of 21
was the lowest of the five main
scorers and still was over the 50
mark.n

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. W-Dan
Andreas' 12-foot jump shot with
one second left on the clock gave
Ohio State, the Big Ten leader, a
78-77 victory over Indiana's Hoos-
iers last night.
Andreas' basket, his second of
the night, climaxed a torrid second
half in which first one team and
then the other was in front. It
came 10 seconds after Butch Joy-
ner had given the Hoosiers the lead
at 77-76 with one foul shot.
Indiana led most of the first
half, by as much as 11 points at
one time, and had a 36-33 inter-
mission lead.
The victory boosted the Buck-
eyes conference record to 5-1. The
defeat, Indiana's fourth straight,
made the Hoosiers 2-4.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS

In an effort to break the Ohior
State string, Indiana Coach Lou
Watson started sophomores Mike
Noland and Kenny Johnson in
place of Earl Schneider and Bill
DeHeer.
AISA
S S (101 E L
Kentucky y, Minnesota 86
Houston ivy, New Jersey 107
NBA
Seattle 132, Cincinnati 129, over-
time.
Baltimore i1, ban Diego 108
* COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Kentucky 78, Mississippi 62
Vanderbilt 8z, Georgia 77
Tennessee 87, Louisiana State 67
Kansas State 69, Missouri 67
Kansas 5z, ian oa State 50
rS. C. State 1, Alabama A&M 89
Florida 64, Alabama 59

Use Daily Classifieds

TRW is success by association

Big Ten

Ohio State
Illinois
Northwestern
Iowa
Wisconsin
Purdue
Michigan State
Indiana
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

Standings
W L P
5 1 .A
3 1 .7
4 2 .6
3 2 .6
3 2 .61
3 2 .6
3 3 .5
2 4 .3
1 5 .1
1 6 .1

Pct.
8.33
750
667
600
600
600
500
~333
167
143

201

I

Attendance 5,41
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA

58 55-113
53 48-101

From Los Angeles to Houston to Washington, from Space
Systems to Ocean Systems to Information Systems,
young people are making things happen at TRW.

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Why should you
confide in a guy
you've never met
before?

Because the guy we're talking
about is a college recruiter from
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is honestly.
He'll be on campus in a couple of
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First, lay your cards on the table.
Tell him what kind of work would
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So make it a point to meet Alcoa's,
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Interview date:
February 22, 23
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