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February 06, 1968 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-06

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1968

TDB MICHIGAN -DAILY

PAGFl1 IVE~

rUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,1908 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a 47&%A a, A'alc.

6

RESPECT MR. CHARLES:
Marines Expect Bitter Struggle
To Protect Khe Sanh, Hill 881

War Proponent May Oppose
Fulbright in August Primary

I

OPENING SOON

KHE SANH, Vietnam (P)-The Last spring the Marines took
U.S. Marines figure the odds are Hills 881 North and South and
in their favor if the North Viet- Hill 861 at a cost of about 138
namese attack Khe Sanh but they men killed and 397 men wounded.
know they will have a tough fight They have since given up 881
to beat back an enemy for whom North, but added Hill 950 to the
they have gained new respect as a protectives around Khe Sanh.
fighting man. Artillery Support
In fact, they don't call him Just Military rule of thumb calls for
"Charlie" any more - now he's about five attackers for each de-

"Mr. Charles."
The Leathernecks paid dearly
to take the hills around Khe Sanh
last spring and commanders say
the price was well worth it.
For now it is the Marines who
must be driven from each pro-
tected bunker. It is the Marines
who have the clear fields of fire
and mine fields and who can
count on support from many
strong points.
40,000 Troops
Although North Vietnam is es-
timated to have 40,000 men to
battle 5,000 Marines, the odds are
not nearly as lopsided as they
seem on the surface.
There are other American
forces in the northern area which
could help out. Nevertheless, no
senior officer here is talking
about a pushover if swarms of
North Vietnamese attempt to
overrun the three key hills and
the main base and air strip in
the valley below.
Demand New
'Equal Role'
For Quebec
OTTAWA (P)-French speaking
Quebec Province demanded great-
er jurisdictional powers, including
the right to negotiate internation-
al treaties, yesterday as Canada
opened a constitutional confer-
ence Prime Minister Lester Pear-
son said may mean its "survival
as as a nation."
Premier Daniel Johnson, Que-
bec's French-Irish chief executive,
said it was "essential and urgent"
to create a two partner Canada
with an equal role for his province
as the homeland of the French
Canadian nation.
! Johnson declared that French
language and education rights, or
what he called a thin varnish of
bilingualism, would not be enough.
Pearson opened the conference
of provincial premiers and federal
Cabinet members with a call for
"great new act of accommodation"
between English and French, say-
ing that without it the nation
could break apart.
Most of French Canada's dis-
satisfaction was entirely justi-
fied," he said..
Pearson urged the adoption of
French language and education
rights everywhere in Canada and
the proposal received broad sup-
port among the English speaking
provinces whose population repre-
sents about two thirds of the na-
tion.
MATHEMATICIANS
PHYSICISTS
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS
LINCOLN LABORATORY
has openings for a
limited number of en-
gineers, physicists and
mathematicians.
LINCOLN LABORATORY
a research center of the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, is engaged in
research and develop-
ent In advanced -ec-

fronics, with emphasis on
applications to national
defense and space
exploration.
A LABORATORY REPRESENTATIVE
WILL INTERVIEW APPLICANTS
February 9
CONSULT THE CAMPUS PLACEMENT
OFFICE IN ADVANCE
LINCOLN LABORATORY
Mossachusets Insmuteof Techology

fender, providing each has fire
support, that is artillery and air.
The North Vietnamese have rock-
ets, mortar and some artillery
available to them. But it is noth-
ing like the artillery and air sup-
port the Leathernecks count on.
It was estimated that for every
100 rounds fired at Khe Sanh, the
Marines had cranked out several
thousand in return. B52 bomber
raids are daily occurrences.
Marines hope that yesterday's
four hour fight for Hill 861 Alpha
is a harbinger for the future. Hill
861 Alpha is a small knob on the
slope of Hill 861 proper.
Human Waves
The North Vietnamese sent two
strong attack waves swarming at
the lone Marine company holding
it. Artillery from the Khe Sanh
combat base, from Hill 881 and
from Camp Carroll to the east
dropped a curtain of steel around
the besieged Marines.
The Leathernecks on the hill
poured out a heavy concentration
of machine gun and automatic
weapons fire themselves. While
Air Force B52s dropped tons of
explosives on the Communist rear
areas, some smaller jets, guided
by radar, streaked in as close as
500 yards to the Marine lines.
A dense fog which enveloped all
the Marine positions in the Khe
Sanh area gave the North Viet-
namese little protection.
The Marines on 861 Alpha lost
7 dead and 24 wounded. They re-
ported 150 Communist dead along
their barbed wire perimeter, 6
killed inside the wire. It appeared
likely that a large number of oth-
er Communist troops were killed
along the slopes and their bodies
dragged away.
Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, North
Vietnam's defense minister, de-
Im t Iow

stroyed the French strong point
by strong point at Dien Bien Phu
in 1954.
Some Marine officers believe
Giap, who is thought to be direct-
ing the planning for Khe Sanh
from long distance, will attempt
to repeat history.
Others are not so sure. They
fear Giap plans to feint at the
hills, focusing Marine defenses
away from the valley floor, and
then sending waves of infantry
swarming at the Khe Sanh base
camp.
Hug the Marines
The reasoning goes, that if Giap
could hug the Marines - that is,
get in so close that U.S. artillery
and air power would have to risk
blasting Americans, Khe Sanh
would be in trouble.
But the deeply bunkered Ma-
rines believe that should such a
situation develop, there is only
one answer, call in the air and
artillery on their own positions
and count on killing far more
North Vietnamese than Marines,
who will be protected under sand-
bags.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (/P)-Sen.
J. W. Fulbright, who hasn't had
a serious election challenge since
Arkansas sent him to the Senate
24 years ago, is threatened by a
Marine hawk who contends Ful-
bright's opposition to U.S. policy
in Vietnam is delaying the day of
victory.
Fulbright's response: Plead his
case to the voters and field their
roughest questions.
The Senate's No. 1 dove isn't
retreating from his criticism of
President Johnson's Vietnam po-
licy; in fact, he's telling his home-
folk he doubts the administration
now will accept anything less than
victory in the war.
Fulbright's possible opponent in
the August Democratic primary is
former Gov. Sid McMath, a major
general in the Marine Corps re-
serve who has two Marine officer
sons - one in Vietnam.
McMath, now a Little Rock
lawyer, is making an average of
threespeeches a week across the
state, where hawkish sentiment is
strong, contending Fulbright's
criticism "is holding up victory" by
receiving "undue attention."
Many observers see evidence that
Fulbright is gaining strength
through an increasing number of
personal appearances.
In each, he sets out his views

briefly then invites questions from
the audience.
His constituents respond with
alacrity. They probe his stand on
Vietnam; they prod him about his
role in steering the Gulf of Ton-
kin resolution through the Senate;
they worriedly inquire about the
North Korean seizure of the U.S.
intelligence ship Pueblo, and they
bluntly ask the chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee if his dissent is indeed pro-
longing the Vietnam war.
"I don't think it has any signif-
icance at all in keeping Ho Chi
Minh from the negotiation table,"
Fulbright told one such gathering.
"Are you willing to accept the
infallibility of one leader?" he
demanded.
Fulbright is said to feel the
administration will help McMath
if the former governor decides to
run against him.

Corner Huron and Forest
FREE HEATED DELIVERY AND TAKE OUT SERVICE

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*b JOHN HOUSEMAN
Distinguished stage and motion pic-
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yam" with the Professional Theatre Program,
will speak on "Our Contemporary
Theatre."
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7
8:00-Auditorium A

No Admission Charge

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I

READ THE KAMA SUTRA
LATELY?
want to learn all
the positions in time
for Valentine's Day??
Petitions for available
staph positions.
DUE FEBRUARY 14

I

a

Lasts from
dusk'tiI
dawn.

J

Contemporary Discussion
Up From 12th St.
JIM CURRAN
New Detroit Committee
EO U A A AItItEM

If you don't agree that
business destroys individuality,
maybe it's because you're an
individual.

BRITISH
STERLING
So fine a gift,
it's even sold
in jewelry Stores.
After shave

There's certain campus talk that claims
individuality is dead in the business world.
That big business is a big brother destroy-
ing initiative.
But freedom of thought and action, when
backed with reason and conviction's cour-
age, will keep and nurture individuality
-whatever the scene: in the arts, the sciences,
and in business.
Scoffers to the contrary, the red corpus-
cles of individuality pay off. No mistake.

vide things Bell telephone companies need
Because communications are changing fast,
these needs are great and diverse.
Being involved with a system that helps
keep people in touch, lets doctors send car-
diograms across country for quick analysis,
helps transmit news instantly, is demand-
ing. Demanding of individuals.
If your ambition is strong and your abili-
ties commensurate, you'll never be truly
happy with the status quo. You'll seek
wvays to change it and-wonderful feeling!-

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