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February 01, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-01

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THURSDAY , FEBRUARY 1, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILI

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1,1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?AGE THREE

Viet Con

Repeat Attacks;
nn A PA tinr-

DEMAND U.S. APOLOGY:

N. Korean Officials Hint
Release of Pueblo Crew

C

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I1JJJ c1LJ1/J.0 a-L1

Thieu Places*
Nation Under
Martial Law
Communist Destroy
Cholon Power Plant;
Hit Police Stations
SAIGON (P)-The Viet Cong to-
day carried their Saigon attacks
into a second -day; striking two
stations of the national police in
00 Cholon the Chinese section. A
power plant in Cholon also was
blown up by terrorists.
The police stations were hit
within 30 minutes of each other,
starting at 2:30 a.m. From 40 to 50
Viet Cong attacked with small
arms and machine guns, infor-
mants reported.
Up to 4 a.m. there had been no
new reports of shellings or ground
attacks against U.S. installations
like that which swept into the U.S
Embassy compound yesterday.
Saigon Quiet
At 12:30 aim. the U.S. command
reported Saigon quiet "except for
some sporadic small arms fire."
It was disclosed that the Viet
Cong, in addition to hitting Sai-
gon and many centers in their
coordinated onslaught yesterday,
had seized part of Hue, the old
imperial capital.
President Nguyen Van Thieu last
night proclaimed martial law
throughout South Vietnam..
By allied reckoning, the attacks
yesterday had cost the Communist
10 dead for every allied soldier
killed.
While various actions continued,
the U.S. Command said: "It is felt
that we now have the initiative
and that we are no longer reacting
to enemy initiated actions but are
seeking out the enemy."
In the western suburbs of Sai-
gon, 300 Communist troops attack-
ed the headquarters of the South
Vietnamese 25th Infantry Division
at Duc Hao, after hitting it with
mortars.
45 Americans Killed
The U.S. Command announced
I 45 American troops had been killed
and 313 wounded in the 3rd Mil-
itary Corps area in 24 hours. This
did not include casualty figures
for Saigon itself. Allied forces
killed 1,201 enemy in the 3rd Corps
area, the command said.
Two allied tanks and an ar-
mored personnel carrier moving
on patrol north toward Bien Hoa
were attacked by enemy forces on
a Saigon street 15 minutes after
midnight.
Thirty minutes after midnight,
a U.S. spokesman reported there
Sr was still sporadic small arms fire
at Tan Son Nhut air base and
minor contact in a village to the
north of it.
In one of the series of coordi-
nated enemy attacks, the Viet
Cong appeared to have seized part
of Hue, military reports indicated.

s
',
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4

SEOUL(R) - A Communist1 he believed the crew will be re- Chung Hee Park Jan 21 than to
North Korean leader hinted yes- leased if the United States admits the seizure of the U.S. intelligence
terday that the crew of the Pueb- it violated territorial waters and ship Pueblo.
10 might be released under cer- promises not to repeat the inci- His government will object to
TU tain conditions. He said future dent. any direct talks between the
W Ite H ouse developments 'in the Korean crisis The official, Paik Hang ki, dep- United States and North Korea
depends on the. United States. uty chief of the foreign affairs on any proposal to exchange the
thesection of the Federation of Ko- Pueblo crew for North Korean
cMayaTea rean Residents in Japan, said his infiltrators, he declared at a news
Kwang Hyup, secretary of the view was unofficial but he noted conference.
e t Central Committee of the North Pyongyang had demanded a U.S. Intelligence sources reported
e0 sIlatio IKorean Workers Communist par- apology. His federation maintains 88 North Korean infiltrators were
ty, mentioned the capture of the contacts with North Korea. captured last year and 17 sur-
intelligence ship at a reception In Seoul, Foreign Minister Choi rendered.
Administration Claims for a Romanian Communist par- Kyu hah indicated his govern- "A basic settlement of the cur-
ty delegation. ment was displeased with the rent crisis lies in taking firm
Truce-Time Assaults handling of the Korean crisis by measures to assure the security of
T cedTie Assaue "It is a miscalculation if the the United States. the Republic of Korea and pre-
PaceinA acvU..i eii nt o tthey He said more attention should vent recurrence of any provoca-
WASHINGTON (T) - W h i t e can solve the mcident of the in- be paid to the North Korean at- tive acts by the North Korean
House Press Secretary George trusion of the Pueblo into the tempt to assassinate President regime," Choi said.
Christian said yesterday the Pres- territorial waters of our country
Chrsti n sid est rda e adre- by m ilitary threats or by the L Of r
ident has told congressional led method of aggressive war or
Asian crisis might require him to through illegal discussion at the U NoAefpra-ealeshahsi13atofer
propose special measures which United Nations. f ,[ 3.. Itwa-z
he hopes would be considered in a "It will be a different story if To Mediate Korean Crisis
nonpartisan atmosphere. they want to solve this question
However, the presidential spokes- by method of the previous prac- UNITED NATIONS (P) - The ( A diplomat informed on the
man said Johnson did not discuss tice. But they will get nothing if five elected African and Asian U.S. position said the United
any specific measures, and he em- they persist in their present members of the U.N. Security States feared that the mission
phasized there may be no need for method." Council suggested privately yes- would be too large and would
Clink Yn~nnrlalc T-r,- A4A--f-terdayttthat tney serve..as -n-e- 4-1- 4-_O1^-" n V LU iII -pa itK

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A U.S. MARINE gazes out from his camp across the Khe Sand
demilitarized zone. The marines anticipate a large Viet Cong off
anoi s Strength Ma/
Massive Offensive I

I '.. - --y- -& AT--

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analysis
The Communist side in Viet-
nam has fastened world attention
on its appearance of strength
and staying power. It has demon-
strated how much initiative re-
mains in its hands in the Viet-
nam war.
The bold but costly simultan-
eous attacks on Saigon and other
points could arouse speculation
that a big gamble is in the mak-
ing - that the'Communists are
pushing a lot of chips'into the
pot in a quest for some sort of
victory, psychological if not mili-
tary.
Strengthens VC Morale
Such a victory, while far from
decisive in the sense that Dien
Bien Phu was decisive for the
French 14 years ago, could in the
Communists' view greatly
strengthen their bargaining posi-'
tion in' the event of negotiations.
In that sense, the gamble could
be interpreted as a sign that, the
Communist side is preparing for
the possibility of peace talks.
At the same time, the latest
series of enemy spectaculars
makes it appear that the decision,
rests with the Communist sideI
whether such attacks are, for ex-
ample, a prelude to a major battle
in the northern provinces, or
whether the Communists are dis-
playing their ability to force the
United States to the defensive in
all sectors, never knowing where
its foe intends to strike next.
Khe Sanh Ready
The Americans report some-
thing like 68,000 Communist
troops in the area of the demili-
tarized zone poised for an offen-
sive, 40,000 of them near Khe
Sanh. Some Americans have seen

the rash of suicide attacks else-4
where as a diversion to inhibit1
U.S. reinforcement of positions in
the north. But the decisionj
whether a major battle erupts'
there at this time appears to rest,
in Communisthhands. Allied
troops for one thing, are prohib-
ited from- carrying the' battle to
the enemy by entering North
Vietnam.
Saturday is the anniversary of
the North Vietnamese Communists
party. The date has been widely
publicized in Hanoi. It would
seem logical for the Hanoi re-
gime to want something dramatic
to show its people and the world
by that time. Indeed, the Com-
munists in Vietnam already are
claiming "resounding victories" in'
what they call the "massive at-:
tacks on the enemy on all battle-
fi~l T da"'nip~r and estea

hills, 16 miles south of the such proposals. Kim did not say what he meant
ensive there within days. Meet with Congressmen by previous practice. But on the
Christian said President John- receipt of U.S. apology two crew-
tson met Tuesday night with the men of a U.S. Army helicopter
Senate and House Republican shot down when it strayed over
leaders,received intelligence re- North Korea were released in
ports during the night on the May of 1954. This, however, was
attacks on the Saigon and other a year after their capture.
targets, and breakfasted yesterday In Tokyo, an official of a pro-
d rymorning with senior members of North Korean organization said
the Senate and House Armed
onstrate a high measure of initia- Services and Appropriations com-"
tive, mobility and, indeed, morale. mittees.
Something the Communists The administration, however, w orl N W
consider important must be at held in reserve any broad re-
stake in this series of well co- sponses to the specific Saigon ter-
ordinated attacks in the face of ror attacks and the attacks
throughout. So u th Vietnam. MUNICH, Germany-The right-
heavy casualties. Spokesmen for the President said ist National Democratic Party-
By U.S. figures, the investment any 6fficial statement will be NDP-claimed here early today
has been big in terms of dead and withheld, pending more informa- that one of its members was mur-
wounded. tion of the Communist assaults. dered at an anti Nazi rally.
Hanoi Motives Sitting in at the White House The rally had been organized by
On the psychological side, these meetings, which were also re- anti Nazi groups on the occasion
t cogat a time of acrie ported to have dealt with the of the 35th anniversary of Hitler's
attacks bcomate in the United North Korea, Pueblo ship seizure, coming to power in Germany. The
States on the war issue and while were such administration leaders rally was interrupted by shouting
Amerasookat spossibilityofas Secretary of State Dean Rusk, and heckling from right wing dem-
Americans look at sity of Secretary of Defense Robert S. onstrators.
a second Asian front in the Ko- M aaandGnErlG.* * -
rean theater. Simultaneously, the Mc amara,h anGen. Earle GAHNG. - h efn
rea teatr.Simltneosl, te'Wheeler, chairman of the Joint WASHINGTON -The Defense
Saigon government continues to Chiefs of Staff Department said yesterday Secre-
display little aptitude in attempts ,ttary Robert S. McNamara will tes-
to win the loyalty of the people.' Assaults 'Planned tify privately before the Senate
Hanoi may see something else Administration spokesmen gen- Foreign Relations Committee on
+,,ehanoi:ay see +Qsomething erally confined their public ap- the 1964 Tonkin Gthat

terday that they serve as 'inter-
mediaries in the .U.S.-North Ko-
rean dispute over the USS Pueb-
lo, diplomatic sources reported.
The proposal was put to the
United States and the Soviet Un-
ion in general terms, and their,
formal replies were awaited. The
U.S. reaction was described as
negative.
vs Roundup

COPENHAGEN - Denmark's
leading non Socialist parties an-
nounced yesterday agreement on
the basis for forming a coalition
government of the Right and Cen-
ter.
The agreement was announced
by Hilmar Baunsgaard, the man
expected to be Denmark's next
premier.
WASHINGTON - The govern-
ment reported yesterday the
sharpest monthly gold loss in his-
tory during December-$900 mil-
lion, largely because of the Euro-
pean gold rush which followed de-
valuation of the'British pound.
The December loss raised the
total drain for the year to $1.17
billion.

take too long to make arrange-
ments. But he said a one-man
mission might be looked on more
favorably.
Some diplomats have said that
an Indonesian might be a good
choice.
Canada had brought up possi-
ble mediation last Friday, but the
Soviet Union gave the suggestion
a cold shoulder, diplomats said.
The African and Asian mem-
bers of the council - Algeria,
Ethiopia, India, Pakistan and
Senegal - returned to the medi-
ation idea after the backstage
talks among the council mem-
bers had run into a U.S.- Soviet
deadlock on the question of in-
viting North Korea to take part
in the council deliberations.
The United States requested an
urgent meeting of the council
last Thursday, accusing North
Korea of "wanton lawlessness in
the seizure of the Pueblo and its
83 crewmen Jan. 23." The North
Koreans claim the intelligence
gathering vessel was within their
12 mile limit.
The Afro-Asian group told the
United States and the Soviet
Union they were willing to meet
the Korean Communists in
Pyongyang, their capital, or wher-
ever the North Koreans sug-
gested.

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J

E1

lelus l esu yl yme uy. jTi wesatak -e
praisal of the terrorist raids on
Psychological Victories moved the South Vietnamese gov- South Vietnam's cities to stress-
But the Communists may also ernment to invoke martial law, a ing that the truce time assaults_
consider that they have much to setback to the fledgling, elected must have been well planned in
gain psychologically. They have parliamentary government. The advance.
hit not only Saigon and threat- promised reforms in the South' At the State Department, press
ened the U.S. Embassy itself, but yet to get off the ground, are officer Robert J. McCloskey said
Da Nang and Hue, other provin- likely to be delayed all the longer, the United States is still actively
cial capitals, nine U.S. air bases All this could be calculated, in seeking peace negotiations with
and the big American base at Nha the Communist view, to aggra- North Vietnam. A diplomatic probe
Trang, and numbers of U.S. field vate frustrations among many has been underway since Hanoi
positions, all, within two or three Americans and to increase the announced a month ago it will
days. number of doubters about the enter into talks if the bombing of
This could be intended to dam- American course. North Vietnam is halted.
-i

preceded the U.S. buildup in Viet-
nam.

-------__,_ _ ._T_ --

ONCE

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TIVAL

ELECTRONIC MUSIC THEATER

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Faculty Architecture Exhibit:
graphics, publications, and competition
solutions in city planning, building design,
and urban design.
S - FEB. 7-13- ARCHITECTURE BUILDING
SModern Italian Art Exhibit:
" "painting, sculpture, photographic collage,
and prints representing the abstract
arts of the new generation of Italy.
through FEB. 10: ALUMNI
0%m - MEMORIAL MUSEUM-
V .m Whistler Exhibit:
-Detchings and lithographs by this famous
American painter,
throu h FEB 13: UGLI GALLERIES

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Thu
ONC

rs., Feb. 8
CE GROUP

$2.00 Students/$1.50. .. at MICHIGAN UNION, DISCOUNT RECORDS,
CENTICORE BOOK SHOP and PLASTER OF PARIS (Maynard Street)

in cooperation with the UM Creative Arts Festival

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Fri., Feb. 9 Sat., Feb. 10 Michigan Union Ballroom
ONCE GROUP SONIC. ARTS GROUP (N.Y.) 8:30 P.M.
(Repeated performance-
Audience limited)

TONIGHT AT
"Should Washtenaw
Counfy's n morrigible (el
Be Closed" 1423 ilI St.
A Debate by DOUGLAS HARVEY (Washtenaw County
Sheriff) and ERWIN GAEDE (Unitarian Minister)
FRIDAY and SATURDAY .
CHRISTOPHER and SARA
Returning by popular demand to sing
contemporary and original folk music

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
In Cooperation With
THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

PRESENTS

11111%ow~~l a 1w~ . a.

yyr" vnr " "

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Michigan Art Show:
painting, sculpture, ceramics, and graphics
by students from all over the state of Michigan.
through FEB. 7: RACKHAM GALLERIES

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THE MOST ACCLAIMED MUSICAL iN THEATRE HISTORY!

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761-9700

SHOW TIMES: MON. thru THUR. 7:00, 9:00
FR I . & SAT. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 -SUN. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
"The most interesting film released in the U.S. this year. Full of
effective cinematic innovations. PRIVILEGE is excellent. It is full of
satirical cynicism. PRIVILEGE will shake you up.
-FILMS IN REVIEW
"PRIVILEGE" is horror-a totally, brutally exacting film that
dashes the participant's sensibilities (You do not merely "watch"
this movie, it requires-rather, forces-involvement). As it examines
the life of a pop idol (played convincingly by Paul Jones, and loved
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through his mind, it chills and terrifies.
..-Daniel Okrent, MICHIGAN DAILY
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IN PARIS, LONDON OR ROME
(or during its current record-breaking N. Y. run)

T 0 ryA 71AFT ATI7 T IL'rP 17 7 AHIAT7TUT fl?.K t

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