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February 01, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-01

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN riAIITv

PAGE TWO TU ~LTrn !AiIlq A

--tl' V a>. UN R N I

cinema
'Good, Bad, Ugly':

HELD OVER
AGAIN!

c~C"

I

SHOWS AT
1,3,5,
7, 9 P.M.
-N.Y. TIMES

Violent Sermon

"The Tension Is Terrific !~

By BARBARA HOCKMAN
There is a lot of talk current-
ly about violence, its value and
place in our society. Usually,
"violent" means with a vehement
or intense force, but some people
regard any quiet act of destruc-
tion as violence. Movie violence
moves us to these questions: Will
the portrayed ferocious action in-
fluence the viewer towards simi-
lar behavior? And is there some-
thing unhealthy in the produc-
tion and attraction of such
scenes?
"The Good, The Bad, and The
Ugly," (now at the State theatre)
is a film of violence; however, I
contend that it is an anti-violence
movie. Whether intended or not,
the movie has a conscience. It is
a subtle tragi-comic mixture, a
critique of both our violent war-
ridden world and of violent
movies themselves.
The plot is merely prolonged
days-in-the-lives of several men

whose outward behaviors are not
radically different from one an-
other. They are all motivated by
money and profusely kill other,
men standing in their way. Yet,
they are cleverly labeled "good,"
"bad," and "ugly," and the moral
distinctions are revealed.
The "Bad Man" cares only for
himself, ruthlessly delights in
physical torture, and could never
be trusted by anyone. The "Good
Man" stands independent, some-
what alienated from his society,
doesn't seem to relish murder so
much as he considers it "neces-
sary," and might be trusted by
another "Good Man." The "Ugly
Man" grabs for what he can get:
he is a victim of poverty and a
poor upbringing; he commands
our reprimanding sympathy.
These principal characters, set
in the time of American Civil
War, are representatives typical
of our own time. Furthermore,
the Civil War, almost irrelevant

to the movie story, functions as;
a view and critical judgement of;
war. In an army camp scene, the
commanding officer is a sensitive
alcoholic. In a few words he de-
scribes the "war game," a ludi-
crous, pitiful setting forth, which
he is not strong enough to over-
come.
The war theme is a back-
ground, as if to echo each single'
gunshot and multiply it twenty-
fold. The views of the army camp
before and after battle are ultra-
realistic but also very surreal.
They made me feel, on the one'
hand, "it's like a documentary -
how many war films ever showed
the slow misery of collecting the
dead," - and on the other hand,
"it's far away, unimaginable, ab-
stract, can't touch me."
Pervading the whole film, this
surreal mood has two effects. One
is that the movie is truly a story,
that is, a fictio;i. Regardless of
how it is meant to mirror real-
ity, it is all a contrived fantasy.
The other is the sense of a moral-
ity. The film seems to suggest an
untold way of life better than
any of the three characters, and
a judgment over them.
It is quite unlike the pessimism
and nihilism in so many con-
tempory films. This mood is pri-
marily a product of the photo-
graphy. (The dialogue is not
highly significant, and the acting,
while convincing, is not exciting. !
Eli Wallach, the Ugly Man is
ratherdelightful, but Clint East-
wood relies solely on his passive
style for attraction.
The visual effect, the pure im-
age, is the strength of the film,

and I found it, in ways, compar-
able to the style and theory of
Eisenstein. This consists of pre-
dominance of close-up shots, es-
pecially of near-still figures, then
interposed with very distant shots.
Montage effects are beautifully
successful: That is, a series or
sequence of quick, very strong and
total pictures of different things
which relate or convey a meaning-
ful association. Also, there are
well-worked, if sometimes amus-
ing, continuities from one scene
to the next. Occasionally the long
close-up shots grow into carica-
tures, as if they were cartoons, or
pop-art type paintings, but this
does not detract.
Creative Arts
]Festival
Thursday, Feb. 1
STAN VANDERBEEK!
Architecture Aud.,
7 and 9 p.m.
LORD CHAMBERLAIN'S j
PLAYERS
"Salome"!
Angell Hall Foyer, 8 p.m.
STUDENT LABORATORY
THEATRE
Frieze Arena, 4 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 2
S JOHN BARTH
Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
LORD CHAMBERLAIN'S
PLAYERS
"Salome"
Angell Hall Foyer, 8 p.m.

"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat!"
-MICHIGAN DAILY
NeWAIT UNTIL DARK
Next: W. C. FIELDS FESTIVAL

I

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1968
FRIDAY NIGHT
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
NIGHT
Thursday, Feb. I-Stan VanDerBeek
wib appear in person, at Cinema Guild
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 2 and 3
MR. ARKADIN
Dir. Orson Welles, 1955

4

I

Bogart's

I

7:00 & 9:05 P.M.

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDiTORIUM

I

11

For program information, 662-8871
NOW ONLY 75c
SAT. Feature Times
MON-FRI. DOORS OPEN 7:00 P.M. Stair Case 3:00-7:10
STAIR CASE Reflections
72ONY NTONAL eENERAL CORPORATION5:-:2
7:20 ONLY :-:2
FXEASTERN TEATSin,5:10-92
FOR___v'u u uuie Sun. Feature Times
REFLECTIONS F11 -ILL:1E le -
9:30 ONLY 375 No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300 1:i0a5e:5-:1
Stair Case 3:00-7:10
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM
leave the children homes

'Movie-Mural' Effect
Creates Film Collage

By KEEWATIN DEWDNEY
Film-maker Stan Vanderbeek,,
is featured this evening in the1
Cinema Guild sponsored "Simul-
taneous / Magic / Movie / Space /
Theatre," a retrospective of Van-{
derbeek's film works put together
into a space-time collage.
An assemblage of screens, three
aisle projectors, two projectors in;
the booth, and two slide projectors
should furnish something like the
"image library" or "movie-mural"i
that Vanderbeek dreams -about.i
His dreams, however, have beeni
by no means passive. His "Moviei
Drome" studio, looking much like
an observatory and squatting be-
side his Stoney Point, N.Y. home,
is the scene of a prototype image
library.
In the Movie Drome the audi-
ence lies on the floor around the1
circular trim, feet toward the cen-
ter, ;while on all available spheri-
call wall space images, both mov-
ing and still, are projected to pro-
vide the movie-mural. Vanderbeek
clearly sees the audiovisual film re-
placing the major part of our now
non-filmic communication.
Perhaps no one is better quali-
fied to explore the possibilities of
such communication. He is maker
of at least thirty films, some the
recipients of major national and
international awards. Films such as
"Science Friction" (1959), winner
of the Creative Film Foundations
Award of Ditinction, and West
German International Film Festi-
val award; "Breathdeath" (1964)
winner of Bell Telephone Prize
and Third International Ex-.
perimental Film Competition, Bel-
gium, as well as an Ann Arbor
Film Festival award-winner, may
be shown tonight.
In a manifesto entitled "Culture:
Intercom and Expanded Cinema"
appearing in the Tulane Drama
Review a year ago, Vanderbeek
wrote "It is imperative that we
quickly find some way for the 'level
of world understanding to rise to a
new human scale. This scale is the
world.
"The risks are the life or death
of this world . . . I propose the
following: That immediate- re-
Y
BOGART
THE KING-
IS BACK WITH
"THE QUEE"
STARTS
SATURDAY
Vtli Forum

search begin on the possibility of
a picture language based _on mo-
tion pictures. That we combine
audio-visual devices into an edu-
cational tool: an experience ma-
chine or 'cultural intercom.'"
Vanderbeek's Movie Drome is
a prototype of just such and edu-
cational tool. He envisages sever-
al such centers located over the
world receiving audio visual mes-
sages via satellite from a kind
of audio-visual bank. Computers
process, this information and aid
in the forming of this information
into an audio-visual experience
particularly suited to local con-
ditions.
The content of tonights show-
ings held at both 7 and 9 p.m. in
the Architecture and Design Aud.,
should include most of his better
known works. Films such as
"Wheels No. 2 and No. 1" "Panels
for The Walls of the World,"
"Computer Art" might be shown
but the actual content is as yet
uncertain.
May this previewer say that to
miss Vanderbeek is to miss both
an exciting peek into the future
and a more than passing glimpse
of oneself.

I

"SPLENDID!
INGEN IOUS !
-Time Magazine
'EXCELLENT
PERFORMANCES !"
-Carroll, N.Y. News
-Wolf, Cue Mag.
"YOU JUST HAVE
TO GO SEE IT!"
-Cosmopolitan Magazine

Program information 8-6416
I"A movie you won't '
want to miss!"
-Judith Crist. the Today Show

the whole crazy4
mixed-up love st is
back in action!5
lbs belching scene... the leeches...
Uie escape Itirough the jungle..e
HORIZON PICTURES presents
HUMPHREY BOOARTATHARINE HEPBURN
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.t { 1 ~ Ona '(5'R . OtQR YTECHNICOLOR
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
STARTS SATURDAY

TAYLOR
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IN THE JOHN HUSTON-RAY STARK PRODUCTION
REFLECTIONS
INAGOLDEN EYE
PLUS SECOND GREAT HIT
The year's #1 best seller
picks you up and,
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ANALANIPAKULA ROBERT MUIwGAN
WEDNESDAY-Feb. 7th
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/MD -.r a BKE NICHOLS-LAWRENCE TURMANOS
j r THE GRADUATE r
AN EMBASSY PICTURES RELEASE

4o

MGM, Flmispeei
Dirk Bogarde
Jack C cwtos FRlm of

I

SAT. 1-3-5-7-9-11
SUN. 1-3-5-7-9
MON. thru THUR. 7-9

Vali Forum

The Man with No Name Returns .

210 S
use
ii'
- I
i
I
- -
i-

FIFTH AVE. NEAR LIBERTY-761-9700
LAST 2 DAYS TO SEE "PRIVILEGE"
Daily Classifieds'

I

11

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
Oscar Wilde's
SALOME

by

Our Faculty's Own

CLIIN EASTWOO0D n THE GOOD,
O THE BAD1
co-starrgEUGLY
EVAN CLEEF A IVR IMiio BRE --Te s
-also starring ________ __ [66JEREIm E LLUL\JL r "
AGE SCARPELLJEUCIANO VNCENZONI and SERGIOLEONE-
ENNI MORRICONE - ALBERT0 GRIMALDIor P.E.A.-Produzioni Europee Associate, Rome
in the role of Tuco Suuut dForMature Audinc-' CHNISCOPE5TECHNICOLOR' ,5nrAr

LORD CHAMBERLAIN PLAYERS

Thurs., Fri., Sat., Feb. 1-3
8:00-foyer of Angell Hall

Tickets:

$1.00 at Union desk

UAC

R

3 SHOWS DAILY
1:45-5:00-8:05
4 SHOWS
Friday and Saturday
1:00-3:40-6:20-9:15

NO 2-6264

ill

Coming Next

LEE MARVIN as
T AT E ("SERGEANT RYKER"
Th r

T

0

N

I

G

H

T

I

STAN VANDERBEEK
Collagist, Collisicnist, Illusionist, & Film-maker
OL.:_ Thursday, February 1

PI

N111 ; MEOW -aff..

11

Hill

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