100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THILE"E

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Novotny Ousted
As Czech Leader
Party Elects Dubcek as Secretary;
Government Reshuffle Expected

LABOR SHORTAGE, CHINESE INFLUENCE:
Hanoi Fears Provoke Peace Feeler

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia (P) -
Soviet-educated Alexander Dubcek
emerged on top yesterday night in
a dramatic power struggle in the
Czechoslovak Communist party
that ousted Antonin Novotny as
party leader.
The switchover, virtually certain
to be followed by a major govern-
ment reshuffle in the next few
days, was announced in a commu-
nique at the end of a four day
secret party caucus.
Novotny, now 63, had risen to
the top of the party hierarchy
when the country was deep in the
grip of Stalinism. He kept his posi-
tion of state president, which he

had held in dual function. The
term ends next year.
In what looked like the biggest
upheaval since the country came
under Communist control 20 years
ago, Premier Josef Lenart also was
reliably reported to be on his way
out.
. His successor is likely to be Old-
rich Cernick, 44 year old deputy
premier and chief of the govern-
ment's Central Planning Commis-
sion.
Termination of Novotny's dual
party-state role reduced him to
figurehead status in the govern-
ment.
The official communique said
the party's central committee
separated the functions "in keep-
ing with the initiated process of
democratizaiton in the state polit-
ical sphere."
'Request'
"For these reasons, the plenum
approved the request of Comrade
Antonin, Novotny, Czechoslovak
president, to be relieved of the
function of first secretary," the
communique added.
Dubcek, 46, has headed the Slo-
vak wing of the Communist party,
the prime force in the campaign
to oust Novotny.
In a brief speech, the commu-
nique said, the newly elected party
chief "emphasized the basic Lenin-
ist principles of the policy of our
party, its unity and loyalty to
Marxism Leninism."
Underground
Dubcek spent most of his youth
in the Soviet Union and then re-
turned to Czechoslovakia to join
the Communist underground in
1939 during the Nazi occupation.
He rose through party ranks and
in 1963 replaced Karol Bacilek, a
staunch Stalinist, in the presidium
of the party.
Dubcek is a Slovak and charges
that Slovakia did not get a fair
shake in economic development
projects figured in the power
struggle. There also was unrest
reported among writers, students
and officials of the Slovak branch
of the party.
In'his New Year's address, No-
votny declared in the Slovak re-
gion "must be accelerated" but the
gesture failed to stem the opposi-
tion.

Alexander Dubcek

New Heart
Shows No
Rejection
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (lP-
Dr. Christiaan Barnard said yes-
terday Dr. Philip Blaiberg may be
sent home in about three weeks
if his new heart continues to func-
tion normally and described his
patient as feeling fine.
In an optimistic report on his
second heart transplant patient,
Barnard said the 58-year old re-
tired dentist had a steady pulse,
stable blood presure and improved
liver and kidney functions.
"His heart function is normal,
the size is normal' and the lungs
are clear," Barnard added.
A hospital bulletin said Blai-
berg's body was free of infection
and showed np sign of rejecting
the transplanted heart he received
Tuesday in history's third human
heart transplant.
Barnard said once Blaiberg is
released he would return to Groote
Schuur Hospital for daily exam-
inations. Once he goes home, Bar-
nard said, "he could not play golf
or anything like that but he could
walk about in the house and go
for rides in a car. Within a few
monthes we expect he could go
back to normal activity."
"We like to discharge heart
patients as soon as possible. The
chance of infection outside is less
than in the hospital and if he does
catch an infection it is not likely
to be so resistant to drugs as an
infection he might catch in the
hospital."

Associated Press News Analysis
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
A severe labor shortage and
fear of long range political con-
sequences could be an important
factor behind cautious peace
probes now being attributed to Ho
Chi Minh's Communist regime in
North Vietnam.
At least some in the ruling
North Vietnamese Politburo may
fear a superabundance of help
from Communist China could
mean entrenchment of Peking's
influence.
Sources in Paris with contacts
in Hanoi say Communist China
has stepped up by five times since
last fall the number of coolie la-
borers sent into North Vietnam
to repair bomb damage to roads,
bridges, rail lines and the like.
They say there are about 250,-
000 Chinese laborers in North
Vietnam, apart from a flood of
technicians and advisers in other
fields.
The stronger the Chinese influ-
ence, the less chance there seems
to be a negotiated end to the con-
flict, at least while the current
Maoist regime, pledged to "peo-
ple's war," remains in power. The
longer the war goes on, the more
Chinese there are likely to be in
Vietnam, which historically fears
China.
Low Output
Hoc Tap, the theoretical jour-
nal, conceded that 90 per cent of
labor in North Vietnam is manual,
an enormous amount of it in ag-
riculture, and that the output is
low.
"The demand for increasing la-
bor output is very decisive," the
paper said, "because only by in-
creasing labor outputs can we
satisfy the present great manpow-
er needs of production and com-

bat and at the same time strength-
en our economic and national de-
fense potentials."
The party was told to make a
total effort to "simultaneously
provide labor for production and
satisfy the troop replenishment
needs of the armed forces under
all circumstances; provide enough
labor for agriculture to continue
to develop it; provide manpower
for communications and trans-
portation so that operation of this
branch may be carried out

smoothly; and provide manpower
for industries, especially local
ones."
The rule would be to "save
manpower, positively mobilize all
sources of manpower especially
youth and women in order to sat-
isfy the immediate needs of the
war."
The demands on manpower in
North Vietnam must be enormous.
Apart from its investment of men
in South Vietnam and Laos it-is
called upon to maintain supply

U.S. Regrets' Hitting
Soviet Ships in Port

lines by semi-primitive means at
a big- cost in manpower. It uses
hundreds of thousands to repair
damage from American bombing.
The needs of agriculture and the
circumstances of the war must be
acute.
Peking Excuse
This shortage provides an ex-
cuse for Peking to send help from
China's vast pool of manpower.
However pro-Chinese some ele-
ments in the ruling upper stratum
in Hanoi may have been in the
past, the prospect of an inunda-
tion of Chinese manpower is un-
likely to be a happy one for the
North Vietnamese. It could impel
them to weigh the advisability of
ending the need of such assist-
ance.
In Bonn the executive of For-
eign Minister Willy Brandt's So-

cial Democrat party called yes-
terday for an immediate halt to
U.S. bombing of North Vietnam
to clear the way for peace nego-
tiations.
"The executive identifies itself
with UN Secretary-General U
Thant's proposal calling for an
immediate halt of the bombing of
North Vietnam to clear the way
for peace negotiations," said a
communique after a meeting of
the party's 33 member ruling com-
mittee.
"If the bombing were stopped,
cease-fire negotiations would fol-
low between the parties con-
cerned," the communique added.
"The Social Democratic party
calls on all concerned to show
signs that they are ready to start
peace negotiations with the other
side in the conflict.

WASHINGTON (R5-The Unit-
ed States voiced regret to Russia
yesterday about any U.S. bombing
of Soviet ships in Haiphong har-
bor. But it said accidents can
happen.
This was the State Department's
preliminary response as Washing-
ton began an investigation into
Moscow's latest charge of Ameri-
can bomber damage to Soviet
merchant vessels in North Viet-
namese ports.
Moscow reported what it called
a piratical attack on the 3,726
ton Pereslavl Zalessky during an
air raid on Haiphong Thursday.
This is because for the first
time Moscow indicated it may arm
its merchant vesels.
"In connection with the situa-
tion that is being created," said
the note delivered by Ambassador
Anatoly F. Dobrynin to Secretary
of State Dean Rusk Thursday
night, "Soviet authorities will be
compelled to carry out measures
to insure the safety of Soviet

ships" going to North Vietnam.
Obviously the presence of anti-
aircraft weapons on Soviet Mer-
chantmen would increase the po-
tential for a direct, shooting clash
between the vessels and American
bombers.
Without confirming or denying
any U.S. caused damage to the
Russian vessel pending an in-
quiry, State Department officer
Robert J. McCloskey said:
"Now if any damage to inter-
national shipping in the Haiphong
area was the result of ordinance
iropped by U.S. aircraft, it was
inadvertent and is regretted."

Petitioning for
Joint Judiciary Council
Six Seats Available
Pick up petitions at SGC offices in the SAB
Petitions Due 5 P.M., Tues., Jan. 16

I

Antonin Novotny
egro Group
Shuns Grant
In Detroit
DETROIT (')-A militant Negro
leader in Detroit announced yes-
terday the Negro federation he
heads was rejecting a $100,000
ggrant from the Ford Foundation
and warned the' city could be
ripped by another destructive riot
this summer.
The announcement was made at
a news conference by the Rev.
Albert Cleage, Jr., who heads the
Federation for Self Determination,
a group established to help rebuild
Detroit's Negro community ra-
vaged by riot last summer.
Cleage also said his federation
was severing all relations with the
New Detroit Committee, a blue
ribbon group appointed by Gov.
George Romney and Mayor Je-
rome Cavanagh to coordinate the
city's rehabilitation.
An avowed Black Power advo-
cate, Cleage said that there will be
another riot in Detroit next sum-
mer if the white community fails
to recognize what he said was the
*heed for self determination on the
part of the Negro community.
The New Detroit Committee dis-
closed Thursday that $100,000 in
Ford Foundation grants would go
to Cleage's federation and to an-
other, less militant, Negro group
known as. the Detroit Council of
Organizations.
Cleage told newsmen, "The New
Detroit Committee can keep its
strings attached money."

Viet Cong Propaganda
Aims at Negro Soldiers

World News Roundup

DA NANG, South Vietnam (P)-
Viet Cong troops launching rocket
attacks on the big Da Nang fight-
er base are supplementing them
now with propaganda leaflets
aimed at Negroes.
The first of the leaflets, calling.
on "colored American servicemen"
to surrender, turned up Christ-
mas Day. It was attached to a log
float sailed down a river near the
base camp of the 1st Battalion
of the 7th Marine Regiment.
The battalion, commanded by
Lt. Col. William J. Davis of Eph-
rata, Pa., is based nine miles
southwest of the Da Nang air
base. Its units patrol throughout
Happy Valley, where a Viet Cong
rocket regiment poses a threat to
the base.
The base has been hit with Rus-
sian designed rockets six times
over the last year, most recently
Wednesday.
'Noel'
The float picked up Christmas
Day, had a wooden cross on it,
letters cut out from crepe paper
spelling out "Noel," and a North
Vietnamese flag designed from
crepe paper.
Two similar floats were sent
down the river. Davis said both
of these were booby trapped, but

no Marines were hurt since they
detected them.
The Christmas Day leaflet said
in part: "Colored American serv-
icemen. Twenty million fellow
countrymen of yours in the
U.S.A. are being abused, oppress-
ed, exploited, manhandled, mur-
dered by racist authorities. You
don't forgot (sic) the bloody Ala-
bama cases, don't (sic) you.
'Misleading You'
"Now, they are misleading you.
driving you to South Vietnam
and using your hands to slaught-
er the South Vietnamese people
who are struggling for peace, in-
dependence, freedom, democracy,
national reunification, for equal-
ity and friendship between the
pe'oples all over the world.
"Is it conceivable that you re-
sign yourselves to help the U.S.
aggressors, the common enemies
of colored Americans and Viet-
namese people, in murdering
your Vietnamese brothers for U.S.
monopolists capitalists sake?
"Resolutely oppose to your be-
ing sent to the battlefront . . . if
forced to join the battle."
"There is no reaction at all"
to the leaflets, said one Negro
soldier. "There is nothing we can
do except keep fighting. It is
making us fight much harder."

TONIGHT and TOMORROW
CINEMA 11
PRESENTS
SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER'S
"A ILET"
with JEAN SIMMONS and BASIL SYDNEY
Also: "FLASH GORDON"

By The Associated Press
NEW DELHI, India-U.S. Am-
bassador Chester Bowles and his
five member team leave Monday
for Cambodia and talks with
Prince Norodom Sihanouk about
the use of Cambodia as a sanctu-
ary by Communist troops fighting
in Vietnam, a Bowles spokesman
said yesterday.
The party will fly from New
Delhi to Bangkok on a commer-
cial airline and then transfer to
a U.S. military plane for the
flight to Phnom Penh, he said.
Accompanying Bowles on the
mission will be Philip Habib and
Douglas R. Perry from Washing-
ton. Habib is deputy assistant sec-
retary for east Asian and Pacific
affairs and Perry is a Cambodian
desk officer.
* * *
LANSING --An advisory com-
mittee to Gov. George Romney on

public relations has reaffirmed its
contention that public employes
should have the right to organize
and bargain collectively but not to
strike.
The committee said collective
bargaining disputes involving pub-
lic employes underline the impor-
tance of dispute settlement pro-
cedures.
The committee said amend-
ments should be made to the
Public Employes Relations Act to
provide for dispute settlement
procedures requiring notification,
collective bargaining, mediation
and fact finding. '

TON IGHT:

7:00 AND 9:15 P.M.

Aud A

SUNDAY

3:00
7:00
9:15

AngelliHa

I

I

r

U

STILL ONLY
75c

Tnigkht at THE ARK

8:30 P.M.

1421 Hill St.

Iilel
TOMORROW, SUN., JAN. 7, 5:30 P.M.
DELI * HOUSE
$1.00 members-=$1.25 others
followed by
DELI * DANCE
FROM 6:30-8:30
with music by
THE. SORCERERS
members free-others $1.00
SOCIAL HALL-B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.
For information on Jewish classes and study groups
to start next week, consult Dr. Jacobs, Hillel Director

till

5:30

ULRICHIS

TODAY

OPEN

THE COMPLETE WINTER SEMESTER SCHEDULE WILL
BE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR

I

i

0

THREE ON A MATCH

(presently negotiating for national so
contracts) singing popular and ORIGINA
$1.00 Cover includes entertainme
- ~ -

ngwriting and recording
L. folk-rock and folk music.
nt and refreshments

I

U

OPENINGS FOR
CHILD CARE WORKERS
-HAWTHORN CENTER

I

I

i

Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children.
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting - a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education, Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine and related Be-
havioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 to 40 hours per week; flexible schedul-
ing to include weekends is possible.
Ana Renirement: Minimum-20 years.j

HEAR HOWE
... Johnson . .

r,

"Now and again we all
succumb to the naive hope
that behind a public man's

appearance there must be

11

II a~earace tere mst b m. ~m' -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan