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January 06, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6,1968

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JANUARY 6,1988

Ranger's Heirs Sue
Bonnie and Clyde'

I

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Across Campus

The 23rd Annual Midwestern room 1139 of the Natural Science the University, has been awarded
C'onference on School Vocal and Building at 4 p.m. the first Edward H. White II me-
Instrumental Music will be held * * * dallion.

HOUSTON, Tex. ()-A suit
seeking $1.75 million in damages
was filed yesterday in district
court against the producers of the
movie "Bonnie and Clyde".
The suit was filed in behalf of
the late Texas Ranger Capt. Frank
Hamer Sr. and alleged defamation
of character and invasion of pri-
vacy.
Warner Brothers Seven Arts
Inc. is named as the defendant
in the suit pending in Judge Wil-
liam M. Holland's 127th Civil Dis-
trict Court.
Hamer's widow and his son,
Frank Hamer Jr., are the plain-
tiffs in the case.
The petition accuses Warner
Brothers of exploiting the life and
career of Capt. Hamer in the
movie.
"A substantial portion of the
showing time of the film 'Bonnie
and Clyde' is devoted to Capt.
Frank Hamer, who is identified
explicity by namve as a Texas
Ranger, portraying him as an in-
ept pursuer of the desperadoes,
Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker,
Ln a wholly fictitious and un-
warranted portrayal, and finally
as their vindictive killer from am-
bush," the suit stated.
Workshops
To Discuss
Drug Uses
(Continued from Page 1)
The last part of the Teach-In
will be the series of informal work-
shops in Angell and Mason Halls
beginning at 10 p.m. There will
be workshops on "LSD Experi-
ences," "Busts," "Comparative Ef-
fects of Different Drugs," "Drugs
and Political Involvement," "Drug
Compliments and Substitutes," as
well as a continuation of Sinclair's
seminar.
All the workshops will empha-
size student participation and en-
courage people to share experi-
ences they have had or opinions
they may have. Because views on
drug use are so varied, it is be-
lieved by McCreath that such a
mixture of views are necessary for
the problem to be discussed pro-
perly.
WCBN radio will broadcast the
keynote address live, and rebroad-
cast various parts of the Teach-In.
Along with SGC and UAC,- the
Teach-In is being sponsored by
the Office of Religious Affairs,
Panhellenic Association and the
Office of Counseling.
Los Angeles
Pickets Close
SF Papers
SAN FRANCISCO (A) - San
Francisco's two major dailies, the
afternoon Hearst Examiner and
the morning Chronicle, were shut
down yesterday in an apparently
unprecedented echo of a strike
450 miles away on Hearst's Los
Angeles Herald Examiner.
The Herald Examiner has con-
tinued to publish though struck
ay the American Newspaper Guild
Dec. 15.
The San Francisco shutdown
was brought about by 14 pickets
from Los Angeles at the scattered
plants of the San Francisco News-
paper Printing Co., which prints
both the Examiner and the
Chronicle. Their editorial offices
are in the same building.
Meeting with management ex-
ecutives F'iday night, Chronicle
Executive Editor Scott Newhall
said, "The Chronicle has not
missed a day's publication for
over a Century."

The Los Angeles pickets said
their marching here was infor-
mational. But San Francisco
workers refused to cross their line.

The suit said Mrs. Hamer and
her son entered an agreement in
1965 with John H. Jenkins and
Raymond Brown to write a book
and to arrange serial and movie
right in connection with the
book on Hamer's life.
The suit said that book is near-
ing publication.
No Permission
It said the authors, who are
also listed as plaintiffs, were ne-
gotiating for a movie or television
series based on their book when
Warner Brothers' "Bonnie and
Clyde" was released without per-
mission of the Hamer Family, Jen-
kins or Brown and without com-
pensation to them.
The plaintiffs asked- $350,000
in damages on each of these al-
leged counts: defamation of char-
acter, invasion of economic in-
terest, unjust enrichment by de-
fendant, invasion of privacy, and
unauthorized use of Hamer's
name.
According to the lawsuit, Hamer
died in 1955 after a career of al-
most 50 years in law enforcement
during which his "extraordinary
courage, dedication and skill as
an officer brought him national
fame and respect."
It said Hamer joined the Texas
Rangers in 1906 at the age of 22
and was involved in "countless
violent encounters with criminals
during his career."
Killed 100
It said he killed more than 100
outlaws in the line of duty and
was wounded more than 20 times.
The suit is the second filed in
Texas in connection with the
movie. A previous action was filed
by Mrs. Billie Jean Parker Moon
and her husband, A. B. Moon of
Mesquite, Tex., alleging the movie
"blackened the memory" of Bon-
nie Parker.
That suit asked $1,025,000 dam-
ages from Warner Brothers Inc.,
Interstate Theaters, Inc., and
Warren Beatty, the director of the
movie who also had the starring
role as Clyde Barrow.
Bonnie Parker and Barrow were
killed by Texas Rangers and other
police officers in the 1930's in an
ambush set up at Arcadia, La.

at the University Jan. 12-13. , The Promotions of James D.
* * * Shortt, Jr. and Richard L. Ken-
New York attorney and author nedy to new responsibilities in the
Morris L. Ernst will deliver the office of University relations at
new year's first University Lecture the University have been an-
in Journalism on Wednesday, Jan. nounced by Michael Radock, vice
17. president for University relations.
Speaking at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. D Shortt was named assistant to
of Angell Hall, Ernst will discuss the vice president for special
"'The First Freedom' Revisited," events. Kennedy, who has been ex-
updating the views he expressed ecutive director of the University's
in that 1946 book. Sesquicentennial office, will be-
* * a ho come director of state and com-
"Circadian Rhythms and Photo- munity relations. Both appoint-
periodism" is the subject of the ments are effective Jan. 1.
first of a series of biology lectures Daniel R. Hegg, a doctoral can-
being cosponsored by the Univer-
sity's departments of biology and didate in aerospace engineering at
zoology. The lecture will be given
on Wednesday, Jan. 17, in Aud. II EN
C. of Angell Hall. NORN V11
* * * SHOWING
A five-week course in reading 375 No. MAPLE
improvement will be sponsored by A SW/N6/NO SA
the University's Center for Con-
tinuing Education of Women, A
starting Jan. 9.1Wait
Information and registration
materials are available at the Cen-
ter for Continuing Education of
Women, 330 Thompson St.
* * * AnAl 2HA1_T

_.- _ _ _ _ _

Hegg also holds the Edward H.
White Memorial Fellowship which
has covered his tuition for the
year.
Dr. Karl Zinn of the psychology
department has been appointed to
the standards committee of the
Association of Educational Data
Systems.
* * *
Dr. R. Keith Arnold, dean of
U-M's School of Natural Re-
sources, has been elected to the
nine-man governing council of the
Society of American Foresters.

-Associated Press

LADY BIRD AT WORK

Deep down Texas way, they say that some lit tie old lady has been running around, planting
bushes, raking leaves, sweeping sidewalks and wielding a mean peair of barber shears. Barber
shears? Yessiree, you betcha. A sign in downtown Amarillo attests that she's got financial back-
ing, anyway. All she needs now is a nose job.
DEPARTMENT DENIES LOSS:
Proxmire Charges Biions Lost
In Misuse of Defense Spending

G ATION MON.-FRI.
Jungle Book
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By The Associated Press
Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis),
charged yesterday that improper
use of government-owned ma-
chinery by defense contractors is
costing taxpayers billions of dol-
lars.
Proxmire said in a statement
that the government "is losing
hundreds of millions of dollars
over the years-billions of dollars"
through contractors' use of Pen-
tagon-supplied equipment in com-
mercial production.
But the Pentagon quickly replied
that its handling of this equip-
ment actually is saving tax funds.
And most of the companies quickly
denied any wrongdoing.

1
i
,

Thomas H. Morris, assistant sec-
retary of defense for installations
and logistics, said "our program
has produced significant savings"
instead of losing money.
"The public interest is not serv-
ed when facts are not kept in
nrn~ nrfYIolxP h nrtr

promote fighting between foreign
countries.
Pentagon officials contended
Friday that the sales help offset
the cost of maintaining American
bases abroad and result in impor-
tant balance of payments benefits
to the United States.

Jackson County To Supply
Dogs for Medical Research

By JAMES JENSEN
A portion of the 5,000 dogs
needed yearly for medical research;
at the University will now be ob-
tained from the Jackson County
Animal Shelter.
Last November, Robert Watkins,;
assistant to the director of the
University's animal unit, was in-1
vited to present a plan to the
Jackson County Board of Super-
visors for the purchase of un-
wanted dogs and cats. The plan
involved payment of at least cost
for the food and housing of the
animals during the legally re-
quired three day waiting period
plus transportation to Ann Arbor.
In the face of strong opposition
from the American Anti-Vivisec-
tion Society and other animal
lovers, the board took no actin
during its December meeting,
since it had found that , the
county's dog law enforcement or-
dinance already allowed for the
sale of impounded animals.
The Jackson County dogs will
fill a near critical need for the
animals, a substantial part of the
over 55,000 animals in the medical
research menagerie. Each year
some 2,500 dogs are used for short
term experiments such as develop-,
ing surgery techniques or in med-
ical schol physiology classes. An-
other 1,200 are used in long term
studies as in organ transplants
and the evaluation of new surigal
procedures. The others are used
in various other types of experi-
ments, ranging from hereditary
conditions in beagles to the affect
of large amounts of aspirin on the
stomach lining.
Those concerned with the treat-

ment the animals receive should
not worry. 'Actually, the animals
are better cared for at the Uni-
versity -than many are as family
pets," Watkins said. "We have
four different diets for cats alone
and our drug bill to keep the
animals in good condition runs
between $500 and $600 a month."
The animal unit employs 26
people to provide full time care
for the animals and there are
five veterinarians to maintain the
animal's health.
Under an agreement with the
Ann Arbor Humane Society the
University obtains all of its ani-
mals outside of Washtenaw
County, generally from dog pounds
in Detroit and surrounding coun-
ties, in addition to profiteering
dog vendors. From its new source
of supply in Jackson County, the
University will obtain approxi-
mately 400 more dogs and cats a
month.

proper erp ctive, niV e Ja A Pentagon statement added
In a related development, the that the principal objective is "to
Defense Department announced promote the defensive strength of
plans yesterday to continue selling our allies 'in a way consistent with
military supplies abroad, this de- overall U.S. foreign policy ob-
spite congressional criticism of jectives."
misused defense spending such as Included in the goods being sold
Proxmire's' ' are such highly sophisticated wea-
The sales presently total over pons systems as F111 and F4
$1.5 billion a year. Most of the fighters, Polaris submarine equip-
weapons and equipment going ment, and Hawk and Pershing;
overseas will be sold to members missile systems.
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or- Pentagon figures show that mil-
ganization (NATO), mainly West itary sales in 1962-1967 period
Germany and Britain, but some totaled $10.4 billion, with another
will be going to other countriesr
throughout the world. $1.6 billion committed for fiscal
1968,
Some congressional members
have charged that the sale of U.S. Sales in the next 10 years are
arms overseas sometimes helps expected to total $15 billion.
r NOW Program Information J 5-6290 TODAY
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Michael Radock, vice president
for University relations at the
University, will join a group of
about 40 corporate and educational
representatives on an air tour of
11 Negro colleges and four south-
ern states, Jan. 8-11.
The tour is sponsored by the
Council for Financial Aid to Ed-
ucation, the United Negro College
Fund, and the National Assocation
of State Universities and Land-
Grant Colleges.
* * *
The University Choir, conducted
by Maynard Klein, and the Uni-
versity Chamber Choir under Tho-
mas Hilbish will give a free com-
bined concert at 8:30 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 12, in Hill Auditorium.
The University departments of
zoology and botany will each spon-
sor a seminar Wednesday, Jan. 10.
The zoology seminar will be on
"A Systems Analysis of the Bio-
energetics of an Isgpod" in Aud.
C. of Angell Hall at 4 p.m.
The botany seminar will discuss
the "Properties of Yeast Pyruvate
Decarboxylase and their Modifica-
tion by Proteolytic Enzymes" in

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