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January 27, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-27

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PAGE TWO

TRF mIiruTtr a N n S Tr.V

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SA'TURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1968

I

music
Koerner: Good But Uninvolved

By BOB FRANKE
At the Canterbury House last
night John Koerner came across
as a very skillful, very hip enter-
tainer, un-self-consciously putting
out for his -audience a dynamic
Interpretation of the blues that
is all his own.
But to say - this implies a lot
that's negative along with the ob-
vious prae. That Koerner is out
to have a good time with the au-
dience is evident, and the natur-
al temptation is to leave it at that
and not take him any more seri-
ously than he wants to be taken.
But respect for his directness
and ability force a person to take
him seriously, and although this
level of appreciation doesn't get
in the way of the good times that
other performers (Len Chandler,
for example) create, somehow it.
is directly opposed to his.

Koerner's music is itself both
visual and impressive (ah, there's
the problem-he doesn't want it
to be impressive). His guitar style
has a driving rhythm and techni-
cal brilliance that are propelled
and enhanced by the irregular
meter that is the standard gram-
mar of the blues.
His singing is virile and happy
at the same time-he doesn't use
pretentiousness as a vocal crutch.
His harmonica style is out of
sight, with sounds that after lis-
tening to Dylan you were sure
couldn't be coaxed out of a har-
monica in a rack.-
His manner on stage is casual,
unrehearsed and funny. His con-
sciousness of his audience is such
that he can dispense with staging
yet retain an easy-going contact
with the people.
But ironically in this rejection of

the standard conventions of per-
formance, he sets up his own con-
ventions, trying to give the effect
of everybody getting drunk and'
having a good time in the back
room.
But he fails simply because it's
the Canterbury House and they
don't serve booze. He is talking
the language of an environment
that just doesn't correspond to the
reality that he and his audience
are in, and this produces a kind
of escapism.
By refusing to admit the neces-
sity and honesty of some kind of
performing convention, he is
blinded to the existence of his own
substitute convention and thus
loses the control over it that could
make it into a positive means of
communicating with his audience.
Implicit in Koerner's idea of a
good time is a refusal to affect the
audience in any depth and an ac-
companying refusal to be taken
seriously. Unfortunately t h i s
creeps into his music, reducing the
subtlety and range of color of the
blues to an admittedly brilliant
monochrome.
A good contrast here would be
Skip James, who projects the un-
sentimental irony of his music in
a variety of moods, sharing Koer-
ner's unaffectedness but, unlike
Koerner, having the courage to
risk exposing his emotions and
open himself to the possible, but
unfounded charge of sentimental-
ity.
Koerner, in the self-imposed
omission of this aspect of experi-t
ence is a lot safer, but a lot less
convincing and a lot less in touchs
with reality.f
In refusing to reveal the emotion-]
al aspects of the blues he does1
the blues an injustice, mistakenlyi
equating emotion and sentimen-
tality he omits emotion, perhaps
just to be on the safe side. And
it is this concern for safety, thei
negative aspect of his hipness,i
that makes serious communica-
tion in the context of a goodc
time impossible.

Across
Campus
Poet Robert Kelly will read from
his work at 7:30 p.m. tonight at
1106 Brooklyn St., Ann Arbor.
Kelly has been a popular poet for
a number of years, his most re-
cent publications including "The
Scorpions" (Doubleday, 1967) and
"An Alchemical Journal" (Io,
1967). A scholar of the medieval
period, he is presently on the fac-
ulty of Bard College in New York
state.
It is clear from his work that
Kelly has a deep knowledge of
occult systematics and cosmology.
His poems, however, are much
Creative Arts
Festival
Saturday, Jan. 27
MIRIAM MAKEBA in concert.
Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 28
ART BUCHWALD "Son of
the Great Society."
Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 29
PETER ARNOTT, puppeteer
presents "Dr. Fautus":
Aud. A, Angell Hall, 8 p.m.
NATHAN MILSTEIN, vio-
linist:
Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
more than descriptions of the in-
dividual systems he has studied.
Like Blake, he has created his own
system, and one that is peculiar
to the 20th Century.
Kelly's work partakes of the sub-
stance of the internal universe we
each (and collectively) inhabit.
His works illustrate the power of
the man ( and poet) to spin nat-1
ural order in the dimensionality
and fecundity of a specific per-
sonal work.
It is suggested that not only
poets but philosophers, biochem-
ists, and mathematicians would be
interested in the growth and form1
of Kelly's work.
(For information, call 761-6158.)

(Continued from Page 1)
actually firing and observing their
rockets.
The sort of function described
by Allen-using University lands
to extend classroom learning sit-
uations from facts and theory to
applications and observation -
has long been recognized by the
School of Natural Resources.
Much of the other out-state land
owned by the University is used
by the natural resources school
for experimental biological studies
and training of forestry and fish-
eries students.
Over half of the University's
out-state lands are contained in
the 9,000 acre Biological Station
situated between Burt and Doug-
las Lakes in the northern Lower
Peninsula. Camp Filbert Roth,
comprised of 204 acres located in
the Ottawa National Forest in the
western part of the Upper Penin-
sula, is used for instruction in
surveying and forest biology. Ac-
reage located in other areas
around the state, including Sugar
Island near Sault Ste. Marie and
160 acres in the Saginaw River
Valley, is well suited for a wide
variety of research projects in
ecology and related natural re-
sources subjects.
Closer to Ann Arbor, only five
miles northwest of Dexter, lies
Stinchfield Woods, 840 acres of
forest land given to the Univer-
sity in 1925. Covered with native
hardwoods and transplanted ev-
ergreens, the land offers students
a chance to engage in the actual
development and handling of a
forest property on a scientific
and business basis, including log-
ging and operating a small saw-
mill.
The most recent addition to theI
resources available to botany stu-
dents is a 22-acre parcel of land
on the west side of the Univer-
sity-owned Ho-rner Woods acreage
near Dixboro.
According to Professor Warren
H. Wagner, director of the Uni-
v'ersity Botanical Gardens, the
area will add to the value of the
original Horner Woods property
by acting as a buffer against out-
side influences.

FIELD EXPERIENCE FOR STUDENTS:
Scattered 'U' Lands Aid Education

Prof. Alexander H. Smith of The only major parcel of land ology department for summer in-
the botany department said that owned by the University outside struction.
the new tract joins with the orig- the state is Camp Davis Geologi- Many different types of geolo-
inal property to form one parcel cal Station, located in the Rocky gic structures are exposed, in-
of land in various stages of bo- Mountains near Jackson, Wyom- cluding sedimentary igneous rocks
tanical development. ing. The station is used by the ge- of interest to researchers.
"It includes a succession pro-
gressing from 'old field' habitats
to brush-encroachment to hard- CZrkA ,GUILD
wood forest to the climax forest
of the oirginal Horner Woods it-
* self," he said.
Wagner termed the University'sS Tand SUNDAY
land resources for ecological stu- SATURDAY
dies "unbeatable, with the pos-
sible exception of Berkeley.
"There is no question about the
value of these lands for scientific
research," he said. At the present
time the Botanical Gardens is
being used in 65 research pro-
jects.
ORGANIZATION PART
NOTICES THE CHILDHOOD OF
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTs is available to offlfclally
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAB. * . Director, Mark Donskoy, 1 938
Bach Club meeting, Wed. Jan 31, 8
p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe; talk-
ing, listening, etc. BYO Bach records. . . . there is Donskoy and Gorky, whose themes of
For further information call 769-1605.
* * * hardship and poverty combine to elevate the inno-
AFS Club, Sun. Jan. 28, 7:00 p.m.,
3rd flogr meeting rooms - Union. cence of childhood, the over-all goodness in man,
I Meeting with discussion of World's
Fair Booth. If any questions call Bob and the gaiety of life."
Anderson.
« «
Committee for Improved Education
presents - John Holt, educator and
author of How Children Fall and How
Children Learn, in a benefit talk for ARCHITECTURE
the children's community, 7:30 p.m. 7:00 & 9:05 P. M.
Wed. Jan. 31, Schorling Auditorium -*AUDITORIUM
University High School.
Lutheran Chapel - Hill at Forest For program information, 662-8871
Ave. 6:00 supper, 7:00 - speaker Dr.
William Stapp, Assoc. Prof. In Conver-
sation, Sun. Jan. 28.
* * * NOW ONLY 75c
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sun. Jan. 28, 9:45 & 11:15
a.m. Worship Services. 11:15 - Bible
6:45s 6:00 p.m. - Fellowship supper,
on the book of Acts. O
6 5p.m. - astor Shoelpa will speak rder Your Daily Now-
La Sociedad Hispanica, Una Tertulia,
Mon. Jan. 29, 3-5 p.m., 3-5Frieze. Phone -
Cafe, conversacion, musica, venganto-

*i

-Daily-Jim Forsyth
Spider John Koerner

white Charms Audience
With Songs, Personality

Phone 434-0130
;n PSYCHEDELIC
vitFONDA EnaJWce 0CARPENTER ROAD
---S- TRASBERG AT E, Nf
S8:30O

dos.

TODAY at 1,
3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

l_ I IW

By MERYL SACKS
Bob White, a warm, honest
folksinger, is performing at the
Ark this weekend. Last night he
opened the first set with "an old
camp song," --. "Joy, Joy, Joy,
Joy, Down in My Heart, Down,
in My Heart to Stay," and im-
mediately established a close
communication with the audience
by having them sing with him.
Since the group was so res-
ponsive, he taught them two
rounds, "Rose" and a crazy little
kids song about pop bottles. They
learned readily. By setting a re-
laxed atmosphere from the be-
ginning of the set, he established
the rapport between performer
and audience that is so important
in enjoying folk music.
Folk music, says White, is a
vehicle for communication in
many ways. When he is per-
forming, he tries to convey to
the audience his ideas and be-
liefs. However, it takes quite a
while to develop fully this com-
munication; the end of a night
of singing, when only the "hard
core" of folk music lovers re-
main, - is the time he feels to be
the most rewarding.
Furthermore, he believes folk

music to be a universal common
bond, extending far beyond the
confines of the performance.
Wherever he goes, he tries to
establish meaningful relationships
with many people soley through
the common love of folk music.
White is a good folk singer;
his voice is a pleasant tenor and
he uses it expressively, accom-
panying himself quite competent-
ly on guitar, banjo, and auto-
harp. His repertoire varied from
fast, lively songs such as "I Don't
Want Your Army Life," to those
pretty, lyrical pieces like "I Pawn
You My Gold Watch and Chain,"
which the autoharp complemented
beautifully. He closed the first
set with two unaccompanied
songs," "Pretty Saro," and a
Quaker song, "How Can I Keep
From Singing." The audience re-
sponded emotionally to these last
two songs - theregwas complete
silence.
Seven months ago, White left
San Diego and headed for New
York with intentions of singing
there. While he was passing
through Ann Arbor he ran out
of money. Since this time he has
played successfully all over Mich-
igan and I now .able to resume
his journey to the East.

"RITA AND LYNN ARE SMASHIl
-N.Y. Daily

PLUS...
In Color

TRUNK TO CAIRO

with
AUDI E MURPHY

4th JOLTING WEEK
Ask anyone who has seen it
. . . then YOU'LL know why
we're holding it over!
SH

DIAL
5-6290

TOWS AT
],3,5,
,9 P.M.
-N.Y. TIMES

"The Tension Is Terrific!"

--

"GOES WAY OUT FOR MOD!-WILD S
"WILDLY BROADMUGGING! PELL MELL MON
MODNESS PERVADES."
"More belly
?''.*? than in any
ed.

"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat ."
-MICHIGAN DAILY
AUDR HEPBURN

r

L

war UNTIL__ ID K

Feature Times
MON-FRI.
7:00-9:00

FOX EASTERN THEATRESPR c
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769. 130

FEATURE TIMES
SAT. 3:10-5:10-
7:10-9:10
SUN. 1:10-3:10-
5:10-7:10-9:10

leave the children home.

ELI EH .. =.
TAYOR
B - *DO
IN THE JOHN HUSTON-RAY STARK PRODUCTION
REFLECTIONS
IN A L E E WAYSIDE
A THEATR E
- ..Nv -MAaT
r6'
3020 WASHTENAW - ia 434-1782
NOW SHOWINGP
. 8 SJ o 0Q6-ingaMUod!
f WaftDisnewh

611115 BiLD
SUNDAY, Jan. 28, one night only
ANDY WARHOL
My Hustler; From 42nd
Street to Fire Island
Starring Paul America
(1965)
The film IS in this time!

PRI RJNsit anlStMiR PRcOuJC iON IC o
Thei
No Nat
For Three Men
ii
TheTivieWa
Wasn't Hell. I
THE
4o JtD ng C F
HE
THE
E VAN CLEEF

1
?.

DIAL
8-6416
'NG!
News
SLAPSTICK!"
-N.Y. Daily News
MENTUM! . .
.-N. Y. Times
laughs per minute
new film in town!
rful, cleverly direct-
--Cue Magazine
Man with
me Returns!
rasPractice!
GOOD
BAD2
UGlY'
la.

r
n

SNEAK PREVIEW SUNDAY 9:00 P.M.
"The most interesting film released in the U.S. this year. Full of
effective cinematic innovations. PRIVILEGE is excellent. It is full of
satirical cynicism. PRIVILEGE will shake you up ...
-FILMS IN REVIEW
remarkable . . . unmistakable brilliance . . . it is a striking
film, a moving piece of work to watch . . ." Penelope Gilliat.
--THE NEW YORKER
"..moves boldly, searchingly - and often amusingly and
searingly - in areas previously untouched by feature film-makers
-Arthur Knight, SATURDAY REVIEW
"One to see for its unique subject. Some overwhelming scenes
depicting frenzy anguish and cold terror of the mind. .."
-CUE MAGAZINE
" has brilliance and startling satiric bite . . This vigorous
protest picture generates reason and power ...
--Bosley Crowther, N.Y. TIMES

Vth Forum

SHOW TIMES: Mon. thru Thur. 7:00, 9:00
Fri. & Sat. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11-SUN. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9

210 S. FIFTH AV
761-970O

VE.

c
I
A
1

1:30,3:00and 4:30

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

V

'p

Universal presents the John Heyman/Peter Watkins Production
a*EWILEE

II

111

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