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January 23, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-23

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PAGE TWO..

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY". JANUARY 23. 1969

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTIF'~flAY JA7~.TTTA)~V 22 lflfiSl

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music'

The Grande: Fun, Phantasmagoria

art
Sports Photographs
On Display at Union

cinema
The Art-Reality Crisis:
A ntonioni's Naturalism

By STEVE SILVERMAN
The Grande Ballroom, Detroit's
psychedelic fun house offers an
amusing but embarassingly ac-
curate picture of what's happen-
ing in pop music and pop culture
at the teeny-bop level.
The somewhat shoddily
dressed-up rock emporium is De-
troit's answer .to San Francisco's
Fillmore; and is definitely the
place to' go to hear the best rock
music iii Michigan. The Grande
alternates between presenting top
name. talent such as The Cream
and Vanilla Fudge and local
bands.
The ballroom itself is an ornate.
hall surrounded: by a colonnade
which at one time. might have
seemed. ostentatious but now only
seems old. The management has
gone -to great pains to establish
a mixed media environment by
means of luminescent paintings
bathed - in black light. There is
also, the ingenious and not so
clever use of the overhead projec-
tion of color slides, oscillating
color-. patterns, rear projection,
kaleidoscopic light machines and
the by now overused and boring
strobe lights.
Tin Foil Wallpaper
The small. stage is dressed up
with .its .own light machines,. and
tin .foil. wallpaper. Besides the
rent-a-cop who frisks you at the
door, all of the employes are
long-hairs and. seem to be just
apt iterior : decoration. A splon-
did sound system blares records
almost at the levels of the live
bands that are to come.
-Yet, taken - as a whole, the
Grande. Ballroom falls flat, hav-
ing -nowhere near the impact or
the frenzy of, say, the Warhol
Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The
Amusement Parlor is too old, the
walls too big, the colors almost
washed out, and the devices too
ordinary, too expected, and pre-
dictable. After a very short while
you become almost ambivalent to
the visual happenings around you.
Though the electrical phan-
tasmagoria is not up to Walt
Disney, .you cannot help but be
affected by the audience and the
bands. The crowd is an amalgam
of, types which fall into distinct
categories, none of which are un-
familiar, but when seen in such
concentration it shakes you up
and you never lose your aware-
ness.
Cher sings "teeny bopper is the
newborn king' and it's the truth.
The king is young. Some are just
long hair or- pop clothes facades
on greasy drag-strip types. Oth-
ers are the long-haired little girls

The SRC have listened to a lot
of Yardbirds and Cream material
as well as Jeff Beck, and they
style their music in that direc-
tion. With two guitars, Hammond
organ, bass, drums and three
singers, they put out a very full
sound.
A favorite technique of theirs
is to begin with melodic phrases
and build upon them by accentu-
ating the beat and filling all of
the holes with each instrument,
playing different parts off the
same riff.
Where the group falls down is
in their original material, which
seem to have weak melodies.
Many seem reminiscent of shod-
dy imitation-Yardbirds material.
All of the songs, for example
"Black Sheep " are calculated to
overpower the audience and suc-
ceed on the driving rhythm alone.
This never happens since the
song itself is weak in melody and
in most cases, the vocal gets lost.
Banal Lyrics
These are problems similar to
those of Jim Hendrix, though-
Hendrix is far superior. The ori-
ginal material also suffers from
banal lyrics, like in "Two is the
Reason," and the band is at its
worst when they slow down in a
song like "Simple Task."
The bare adequacy of the sing-
ing, especially that of Richard,
becomes an obvious detraction.
The SRC was at its best doing
"Tallyman," "Stroll on," a med-
Keeps A'Rollin" and Beck's "Bo-
lero," and a Big Brother number
"Halls of The King." In all of
these instances the virtuosity of
lead guitarist, Gary Quackenbush,
and the texcellence of the group
becomes apparent.
From this one can only hope
that the SRC will realize that
not every five-man group is the
Beatles, and that perhaps they
should look for material outside
the group.
In all, they have very compe-
tent musicianship, professional-
ism and poise, though there is a
lack of completed ideas. They are
awaiting the release of their al-
bum of Capitol Records, which
would indicate that someone be-
lieves they have what it takes to
develop into a significant group.
Silk Pajamas
Led by Iggy Osterberger, known
to Ann Arbor rock fans for his
work with the Prime Movers, the
Stooges were visually the most
exciting thing at the Grande.
Iggy wore white silk pajamas and
a two-foot high wig of curled
aluminum topped off with white-
painted-:face. The: drunmer
played on two oil drums. Suffice
it to say that with "Iggy on
vacuum cleaner the group played
what was easily the most imagin-
ative music of the evening.
They played electronic music
which utilized controlled feed-
back, wah-wah, pedal, slide gui-

By LEE WEITZENKORN
A photographic show of sport-
ing prints by a former Wolverine
and Olympic athlete are on dis-
play in the north lounge of the
Union through Feb. 5.
The exhibit, by Ralph Craig, '11,
opened Sunday, and includes
photographs of various sports such
as rowing, sailing, pole vaulting,
and harness racing, designed to
"catch the essence of a sport and
to evoke an emotional reaction
In sympathetic viewers."
On Sunday, Craig was awarded
the Helms Hall of Fame Award
for his Olympic achievement in
track and field.
Craig had his first show two
years ago. Since then, his prints
have been shown throughout North
America, including an exhibit at
EXPO '67. Those photographs are

now kept by the Swedish Olympic
Committee and the King of Swe-
den. Several are being selected for
the National Art Museum of Sport.
The show now on display here is
sponsored by UAC.
Craig represented the U.S. in
the 1912 Olympics, and won the
100 and 200 meter dashes. Only
15 other men in the world have
won double track and field cham-
pionships in Olympic games. Craig
was a member of the Olympic
yachting team in 1948, and now
holds the record for the longest
!span of Olympic team member-
ship 36 years. He twice tied the
world record for the 220-yard dash.
Craig, a retired industrial engin-
eer, became a photographer at the
age of 69, while working as a free-
lance writer. Originally from De-
troit, he now lives in Virginia.

They were all very bored, those
rich people in Michelangelo An-
tonioni's "La Notte," w h i c h
played this weekend at Cinema
Guild. Marcello Mastroianni was
a bored writer and Jeanne Mor-
eau was his bored wife and Mon-
ica Vitti was a bored girl, of
eighteen and many, manyl
months. But you know how An-
tonioni likes to blow things up;
it was, after all, just a movie..
But what about this item from
the Chicago Sun Times society
page, Jan. 22:
"DANCE AWAY BOREDOM"
"If you find yourself in the
doldrums why not capitalize on

it. That is what a group of young
Lake Foresters thought when
they decided to call their Friday
night dance the Doldrums Ball.
It was given at the Volney Fos-
ters' home and everyone whiled
away dull cares in a very merry
mood.
"It was a Dutch treat party of
about 50 couples. The group
would like to have invited a larg-
er number, but though the house
is large and well-adapted to
dancing, it is not spacious enough
to accommodate a gathering of
the size that might attend a sim-
ilar party at Onwentsia (Coun-
try Club), for instance."

-Daily-Andy Sacks
The Scott Richard Case

THIS WEEK
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24
BIRTH OF A NATION.
DIRECTOR-D. W. GRIFFITH (1915)
A story of the Civil War, Reconstruction
and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan
THURSDAY & FRIDAY, JAN.25 & 26
MEIN KAMPF
A documentary (1960) of films taken from
Nazi files, edited in Sweden, narrated in English
SATURDAY & SUNDAY, JAN. 27 & 28
GORKY TRILOGY
PART I: THE CHILDHOOD OF
MAXIM GORKY

4

with a lost innocence and a tough
look. The boys are ugly almost to
a man. The outfits run to ex-
tremes with apes, vinyl, long
bellbottoms, overly curled or pos-
itively straight hair, boots, army
surplus or period costumes.
A lot of people look alike and
it's clear that they all know
what's going on in, the Haight':
Most interesting is the fascina-
tion with the bands. They sit and
watch, no one dances, and seem
almost in a catatonic state. They
clap for the songs, and seem un-
aware whether the music is bad
or good, somewhat like the
movies audiences of the early
forties.
They come to listen and watch
what goes on and make heroes
and maybe love the band mem-
bers. They are seventy per cent
girls and the other thirty percent
don't really count for much, ex-
cept to pass the time between
bands when amplifiers are being
disassembled and reassembled as'
groups replace each other on
stage. 'When the bands are on,

though, everyone huddles close to
the stage and gets involved.
Last Saturday night, the Scott
Richard Case, a local band ear-
nestly making its way toward na-
tional success, headed a program
which included another Ann Ar-
bor band, the .Psychedelic
Stooges, making its first appear-
ance anywhere. Also included was
a New York band, the Apple Pie
Motherhood, hitting but another
of the teen club stops which are
serviced by the second rate bands
which have yet to arrive and
probably won't.
The Scott Richard Case (SRC)
is easily the best band in Michi-
gan - very polished, extremely
tight and very, very loud. They
probably will make a lot of
money but it's hard to say. Scott
Richard can't sing but he looks
like Joy Bang (for those who re-
member Andrew Meyer's film
"Early Clue To A New Direc-
tion") and for those who don't,'
think of the models in Seventeen
Magazine.

"POLE VAULT," one of Ralph Craig's prints, now on display in
the Michigan Union.

7:00 & 9:05 P.M.

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

Higher Education Monies Cut
By Cost-Conscious Congress

i
I

AN IMPORTANT HAPPENING
weekend of Feb. 2-4
at St. Paul of the Cross Retreat House
23333 Schoolcraft, DETROIT
For college men-7:00 P.M.Friday till 2:00 P.M. Sunday
talks-discussions-guitar lessons-good food-rest
You are invited-Free will offering
For information and/or reservation
Call 535-9563

I

I

Vth Forum.

210O5.6FIFTH AVE.
761-970

NOW ONLY 75c

tar, and droned
scat-like singing.
tive howling, all

.bass as well as1
and \neo-primi-
backed up by a

MATINEES EVERY DAY-LATE SHOWS FRI. AND SAT.
MON. thru THURS. Shows 2:30-7:00-9:00
FRI. AND SAT. Shows 1-3-5-7-9-11
SUN. Shows 1-3-5-7-9
ENDS TODAY
THE MAKERS OF "BONNIE AND CLYDE" PRESENT

WASHINGTON (CPS) -- Most
of the action affecting higher
education in the first session of
the 90th Congress was negative,
and the major new positive pro-
grams enacted are .not yet under
way.
As a result of a new conserva-
tive mood in Congress and a war
which is taking big chunks out of
the federal budget, many higher
education programs are suffering
from severe financial cuts in fis-
cal 1968, which ends June 30.
The bright spot of the 1967
Congressional session for educa-
tion was the -creation of a $47.5
million Corporation for Public
Broadcasting as a fund-disburs-
ing agency to finance production
of educational public service pro-
grams. But the -new broadcasting
agency has not started because
Congress has failed to appropri-
ate the $9 million in initial funds.
President Johnson, who was
quick to brag about the new pro-

gram, has appointed only two of
the 15 board members for the
Corporation.
The second major positive bill
which Congress passed was the
Education Professions Develop-
ment Act, which gives the Office
of Education expanded authority
to train a wide range of educa-
tion personnel. Except for the
Teacher Corps, however, the new
programs do not start until June
36~.
Most of the negative action for
higher education involved cut-
backs in appropriations for exist-
ing programs.
The Office of Education failed
to get a budget increase for -the
first time in at least 10 years.
And when President Johnson or-
dered across-the-board federal
spending cuts to fight inflation,
education programs were reduced
even more.
In the area of research, sources
say federal research spending will
increase by only two percent this

year, compared to a 20.8 per cent
increase in 1966. However, a two
per cent increase actually repre-
sents a decrease in federal sup-
port because of rising costs. Uni-
versity-based research in the De-
partment of Defense was de-
creased by $12.8 million.
Regarding fellowships, the Of-
fice of Education request for
funds for college teacher fellow-
ships was cut by $10 million. Na-
tional Science Foundation fellow-
ships were cut from 3,636 to 2,600,
and National Defense Education
Act college teacher fellowships
were reduced from 6,000 to 3,325.
In addition, National Aeronautics
and Space Administration
traineeships were cut from 1,335
to 75.

strongsimple drum beat. Unfor-
tunately, the performance was
marred by equipment difficulties.
The Apple Pie Motherhood is a
New York group which might
better have been called the Bum-
mer. They played an intermin-
ably long set .which had few high
points. Featuring a girl singer,
which seems to be a new trend,
thye lacked direction as well as
taste.
On top of this, their girl was
never on key, and their original
material could not even be termed
uninspired - it was just bad.
They proved conclusively that
their approach to rock and roll,
a mediocre torch singer backed
up by the Seeds just does not
make it.

ENDS Shows at
WEDNESDAY 7 & 9 P.M.
"I I AMSTERPIECE"
"'THE tGRQWD BUR$T INTO APPLAQSE MORE THAN
25 TIMES tN 9$ MINUITES/"
-,$4N FRANItSCO tRLM FF5TNA4, OC t9i7
"'AS JQYOUS AJ'D.LLUMINATING A FILM AS ISCWRRENTLY
"EXCITEMENT 0F YOUTH SEARCHING FOR
*SELF EXPRkES~tOK." -pm sw
*AN EYE (PEN ING MOTION PITU
JOAN BAEZL DONOVAN~ BOB DYLAN.- PETER, PAUL & MARY
VENICE FILM FESTiVAL PRIZE WINNER-RELEASED BY PEPPERCORN WORMSER INC. PRINTS BY MOVIE LAS
THURSDAY 0 "SMASHING TIME"

I

*1

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STARTS
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EUZABETH TAYLOR
~~~~IEJOHN 1-IISTON-RYSTARK FDUGUON
REFLECTIONS °-
IN A GOLDEN EYE

I

f . {... { . ...{. " {a...." "OO" . ...O@ ."O{O"*.
: "THE HAPPIEST MILLIONAIRE, a zinging, heel-
thumping musical made of the magical stuff
of Mary Poppins ---GOOD HOUSEKEEPING
"Enjoyment
for everyone
:-, no matter

LAST 2

DIAL
DAYS N02-6264

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"The Tension Is Terrific l"
-N.Y. TIMES
"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat !"

, k 7"

--STARTS THURSDAY-
The Man with No Name Returns. . .

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I MMWWAVZ M r ter- -M vw mk. rww aw"k a I

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