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January 21, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-21

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 21,1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

- ..-- -- I ---

Wolverine

Icers

Double

Hat

Trick

Mustangs, 13-3

By JOHN SUTKUS
"Michigan goal by Koviak, for3
the first hat trick of the eve-
ning, at 1:19 of the third period."+
The impersonal big voice of thea
Coliseum spoke again five min-
utes and 32 seconds later.
Michigan goal by Marttila,
for the second hat trick of the+
evening."
Throw in two-goal perform-1
ances by Barney Pashak, Randy,
Binnie, and Phil Gross, and the
evening becomes a 13-3 Michi-
gan (whitewash, m a s s a c r e,1
slaughter: pick one, fill in thej
blank) of Western Ontario.
Koviak scored the first time
Michigan pushed the puck in to
Western's zone. The goal, at 0:45,
stakedrthe Wolverines to a lead<
they never relinquished. By the
time the first period had ended,
Michigan led 5-1.
Doug Galbraith capped the+
scoring at 15:30 -with a slapshot
from the red line that skidded+
off Western goalie Al Patterson's'
pads into the net.
The second period was practic-
ally an instant replay of theI
first, with ' Michigan getting t
another quick goal. .The end re-
sult of the twenty- minutes of
4 action was doubling the score. +
"We definitely skated better
than we did Friday night," noted
Wolverine coach Al Renfrew.
"And naturally we could score
*more."

The same problem as Friday;
night bothered the Mustangs,I
namely the Wolverine defense.
Only last night the cast was
changed a little as Harold Her-
man replaced Jim Keough in
goal. Herman, back in the pads
for the first time this season,
kicked out 27 shots, including a
couple of nifty breakaway saves.
Western managed to dribble in
three goals on Herman, one in
each period.
FIRST PERIOD
(M) Koviak (Lord) 0:45; (M) Mart-
tila. (Unsst.) 8:47; (M) Pashak (Un-
asst.) 11:38; (WO) L'Heureux (Currie)
13:15; (M) Pashak (Hansen, Marttila)
14:33; (M) Galbraith (Hartman) 15:30.1
PENALTIES
(WO) Pirie (Cross-check) 3:11; (M)1
Lord (Cross-check) 10:39; (WO) FieldI
(Hooking).13:45; (M) Gross (Inteerfer-
ence) 17:01.
SECOND PERIOD
SCORING
(M) Binnie (Koviak) 0:40; (M) Gross!
(Parrin, Marttila) 1:49; (WO) Heslop
(Field) 3:59; (M) Koviak (Field) 3:59;
(M) Koviak Ullyot) 5:48; (M) Marttila'
(Hansen, Brook) 7:49; (M) Binnie
(Gross) 16:28.
PENALTIES
(WO) Pirie (Hi-stick) 3:08; (WO)
Maloney (Hi-stick) 3:08; (WO) Ma-
loney (Roughing) 3:08; (M) Pashak
(Hi-stick) 3:08; (M) Perrin (Hi-stick)j
3:08; (M) Perrin (Roughing) 3:08;
(WO) Pirie (Hi-stick) 5:28; (M) Han-
sen (Slashing) 8:04; (WO) Currie
(Slashing) 19:28.
THIRD PERIOD
SCORING
(M) Koviak (Ullyot, Binnie) 1:19;
(M) Gross (Kovak) 3:25; (M) Marttila
(Galbraith) 5:51; 1 WO) Field (Heslop,
Care) 7:51.

Herman was helped by a solid
effort from the rest of the Wol-
verines. The defense broke up
the Mustangs' fast breaks to the
point of frustration.
The offense kept the pressure
on Patterson all night. There
were times when the Wolverines
launched as many as eight shots
at a time at him. Oddly enough,
the Mustangs figured one of their
strongpoints this season would be
their defense. Earlier this season
they dropped a tight defensive
game 3-2 to WCHA member
North Dakota.
The 13-goal total was the high-
est for the Wolverines this sea-
son.
The two-game series sweep
of Western Ontario has provided
a respite between series with
WCHA opponent Minnesota. Last
weekend, Michigan swept a pair
from the Gophers, 3-2 and 7-6.
Next weekend the Wolverines.
travel to Minneapolis for another'
two-game set-to with the Goph-
ers.
Thur-mond
Injured; Out
For Season
SAN FRANCISCO (P) - Nate
Thurmond, offensive giant of theI
San Francisco Warriors, is lost
to the team for the season because
of torn ligaments.
Thurmond, injured as the War-
riors defeated the PhiladelphiaM
76ers in Oakland Friday night,
underwent a two-hour operation
fn San Francisco's St. Mary's
Hospital yesterday morning.
The team physician, Dr James
Raggio, said the operation was a
success, b u t that Thurmond
would be in a cast six to eight
weeks. A period of muscle re-
habilitation will follow with the3
prospects that Thurmond might
be ready for action if the War-
riors gain the playoffs at the
end of the regular season.
Thurmond was blocking an r
opponent in the fourth quarter1
when he was hurt.
Michigan 70, UCLA 69
UCLA1
G F T
Alcindor 4 7-8 15
Lacey (! 0-0 01
Warren 5 3-3 13 1
Shackelford 4 2-2 10
Allen 10 5-9 25
Lynn 2 0-0 4
Nielson 1 0-0 2c
Totals 26 17-22 69
HOUSTON
G F TI
Hayes 17 5-7 39 1
Chaney 5 1-3 11 p
Reynolds 5 3-3 13
Lee 1 2-4 4
Spain 1 0-1 2
Lewis 0 0-0 0 1
Gribben 1 0-0 2

*

*

*

*

*

*

Hawke yes Down 11' Gymnasts

Special To The Daily
IOWA CITY - The defending
Big Ten Champion Iowa Hawk-
eyes showed Michigan's gymnas-
tics team their opinion of the
Wolverines' chances to over-
throw them in a victory list
night that wasn't as difficult as
had been expected,
The 189.95-186.85 score was the
worst Michigan loss in Big Ten
competition in quite a few years,
and Coach Newt Loken's post-
game analysis reflected the fact.
"They had an effective home ad-
College Basketball
Ohio State 103. Michigan 70
jMichigan state 75. Northwestern 62
Iowa 82. Minnesota 70
Cincinnati 82, Louisville 72
Columbia 93, Cornell 51
Southern Illinois 81, Wichita 72
Navy 68, Seton Hall 58
;Miami, Ohio, 79, Kent State 68
Virginia 81, Clemson 73
Missouri 72, Iowa State 67
West Virginia 88, Penn State 66
Auburn 74, Kentucky 73
Florida State 73, Georgia Tech 57
Wyoming 81, Utah 72
New Mexico State 76, Texas El Paso 64
Pan American 75 Tennessee Tech 71
DePaul 70, Dayton 65
Bowling Green 83, Western Michigan
67
New Mexico 84, Brigham Young 69
St. Bonaventure's 71, Canisias 65
Vilianova 78, Virginia Tech 61

vantage. Our boys were nervous
and tight. The routines didn't
flow."
Loken asserted that Iowa is
now the team to beat in the Big
Ten, and that they are st"onig in
every event. But he a:icer? "Our
boys will bounce back. They'll
easily exceed these scores from
now on."
Clearly
It was clearly 4he side horse
and rings scores that on-. Mich-
igan out of the running. Where
I oken had figured the Wov 'rines
'teied at least a 27 in a1( levents
to have a chance, the side horse
team picked up a 25.2 and the
ringinen suffered with a 26.05.
There was not too m icil of an
indieation that the Wolverines
were introuble during the floor
exercise Dave Jacobs' score of
.15 and George Huntzicker's
8.95 both exceeded those of their

Ha wxcye competiters. But I w's
K e i t h McCanless a n d Neil
Schmidt both had a 9.30 on the
side horse to put the Wolverines
into a hole.
Rings were next and only
Charlie Froeming's was up to par
for Michigan.
FLOOR EXERCISE-1. Jacobs (M),
9:15; 2. Huntzicker (M), 8.95; 3. tie
Orlni (I) and Dickson (1), 8.8.
SIDE HORSE-1. McCanless (I), 9.3;
and Schmidt. (), 9.3; 3. Dickson (I),
8.85; 4. DeBoo (M), 8.75.
RINGS-1. Hatch (I), 9.4; 2. Schmidt
(1), .9.1; 3. Froeming (M), 9.0; 4. Dick-
son (1), 8.95.
TRAMPOLINE-1. Jacobs (M), 9.4;
2. tie, Miller (M) and Huntzicker (M),
9.25; 4. Morlan (1), 9.1.
LONG HORSE-1. Scorza (I), 9.5; 2.
Huntztcker (M), 9.35; 3. Dickson (I),
9:15; 4. Jensen (MI), 9.1.
PARALLEL BARS-1. Dickson (I),
9.15: 2. tie, Schmidt (I), Lazar (I), and
Rapper (M), 9.1.
HIGH BAR-Schmidt (I), 9.45; 2.
Scorza, (1), 9.3; 3. tie, Farnam (I), and
Jensen (M), 9.0.

-Associated Press

CLARK NORTON
'itnkin9 Out...
Announcer: "Well, basketball fans, all pandemonium has broken
loose here at the Astrodome following Houston's fantastic victory
over the previously unbeaten and top-ranked Bruins of UCLA, 71- ;
69. And ve have with us Johnny Wooden, coach of the defending,
NCAA champs John, how does it feel to have had your 47-game
winning streak broken?"1
Wooden: "Well, Bob, it should take the pressure off us from
here on out. I'd say our winning streak won't be so much in danger
the rest of the season."
Announcer: "John, what about Alcinder? Did his eye injury
really hamper his play?"
Wooden: "Well, Bob, let me say right now that I don't want
to make any excuses for this game at all. But just for the record
perhaps I should mention that this was probably the poorest game
of Lew's career. Now how much the fact that he couldn't see out
of one eye had to do with it, I wouldn't even want to mention."
Announcer: "Thanks so much, John. And now* we have with
us Guy Lewis, coach of the victorious Houston Cougars. Great game,
Guy. How does it feel to have just won the basketball game of the
century?"
Lewis: "Well, I thought it was a good game, Bob. Of course, we
just try to take 'em one at a time. We've got a big game coming up
against Southwest Oklahoma that I'm a little concerned about."
Announcer: "I just can't say enough about Elvin Hayes, Guy.
Was this the "Big E" 's greatest game?"
Lewis: "Well, 39 points is about average for Elvin. How
many did that other guy get, uh, Alcindrip - you know, that tall
fellow who played center for tliem tonight?"
Announcer: "Alcindor scored 15."
Lewis: "Yeah, well, that's not bad against Elvin. And don't
forget, Alcindrip's only a junior - he'll improve. That boy'll be a
good ballplayer some day."
Announcer: "Well, congratulations again, Guy. And now we have
with us Elvin Hayes, the hero of tonight's game. Elvin, what a game.
How does It feel to knock off the national champs and your arch-
rival, Lew Alcindor?"
Hayes: "Well, Bob, (rubs eye) I only wish I could have seen
the game better. My eye's been bothering me all week."j
Announcer: "Your defense was just fantastic. How did you
manage to block all those Alcindor hook shots?"
Hayes:- "Well, I haven't had much practice blocking hook shots
since I was in high school, Bob, but it all came back to me pretty
quick. Not many college players use the hook, you know. That Al-
cindrip must have been a great one in high school."
Announcer: "What impressed you most about Alcindor,
Elvin?"
Hayes: "I'd have to say his height, Bob. Really made it tough
to block exactly three of his eighteen shots, as-I did, causing him
to become ruffled and hit only four shots all night. When he learns
p to u'se that height he'll be a good ball player, though, Bob, no
question about it."
Announcer: "Thanks, Elvin. And here's Lew Alcindor. Lew, this
is only the second time in either high school or college that you'vej
tasted defeat. What are your thoughts right now?"
Alcindor: "Well, I'd like to say hello to my mother, and my
father, and all my friends . .."
Announcer: "Are you looking forward to'a rematch with Hayes
and his teammates in the national championship?"
Alcindor: "If they make it that far. Look, excuse me. This
appendicitis is killing me."

LEW ALCINDOR (left) snag---.
ged this rebound away from
Houston's Elvin Hayes (44) in
one of his rare aggressive mo-
ments in UCLA's 71-69 history-
making loss last night in the
Astrodome. Hayes completely AN EY EWITN ESS REPORT
outplayed Alcindor in the con-
frontation of college basket- o LI
ball's two giants. Ed Laceyapubic lecture by
(54) watched. HARAL D MUNTHE-KAAS
j .Recently Peking correspondent for the
Look here . .. Scandinavian News Agency
OSU 103, Houston 71, Monday, Jan. 29, 8:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN G FT R P T
Fraumann, f 1-2 1-1 8 4 3
Tonijanovich, f 6-15 2-2 8 3 14;Architecture Auditorium
Pitts, c 4-9 8-13 5 1 16
Bloodworth, g 1-5 0-1 2 3 2 Sponsored by The National Committee on
Maxey, g 3-7 0-1 1 1 6
Stewart, f 5-16 7-10 10 4 17 U.S.-China Relations
McClellan, f 2-7 3-4 5 4 7
Edwards, f 1-6 0-0 5 2 2
Maundrell, g 0-0 0-0 1 0 0_-
H-enry, g 1-1 1-1 1 3 31
Fishman, g 0-1 0-0 0 1 0
Totals 24-69 22-33 47 26 70 j
Field goal percentage: 34.8% GRADUA.TING ELECTRONIC ENGINEE

An Organizational Meeting for the
CONSERVATIVE UNION
will be held
SUNDAY, JAN. 21
at 3:00 P.M. in the third floor conference
room of the Union
All Y.A.F., l.S.l., Libertarian League,
College Republican members,
Students for Reagan, and other
Conservatives are invited to attend.
I ---. .----- ~~ - ~~~~~~- --- ~ ^-~

ERS

OHIO STATE G FT
Hlowell, f 12-18 5-8
Hosket, f 8-17 4-5
Sorenson. c 9-15 3-5
Swain,, g 2-3 0-0
MIeadors, g 2-5 3-5
Schnabel, g 0-0 0-0
Geddes, g 1-4 0-0
Andreas, f 3-5 0-1
Walkey, g 0-0 0-1
Finney, g 3-6 4-5
M'cDavid, g 2-2 0-0
Barnard, c 0-2 0-1
Spies, g 0-3 0-0
Smith, f 0-4 0-3
Barclay, g 0-0 0-0
Totals 42-84 19-34

R
2
3
3
1
3
1
0
2
3
a
3
2
0
1
25

P
4
12
16
2
7
1
0
2
1
3
0
4
2
5
1
64

T
291
20
21
4
7
0
10
0
10

BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
WITH
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Totals
UCLA
Houston

30

11-18 71
43 26-69
46 25-71

Field goal percentage: 50%

Fouled out-None.
Total fouls-UCLA
Attendance 52,693,

MICHIGAN
OHIO STATE
Atendance: 13,025

32
58

38- 70
45-103

17, Houston 12.

Nothing's happening in '68.
Except you.
As far as Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company is
concerned.
Everything else is old hat.
We've been there.
In missiles and lasers.
On space walks.
Wherever and however glass could go.
Next stop - the 21st century.
With only once-a-year pauses on campus to look
for creative engineers and scientists for technical
center, manufacturing and sales functions,
If this is your year to happen, look for our repre-
sentative.
JAN. 26
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co.
a m 811 Madison Ave., Toledo, Ohio 43624

ECI's ST. PETERSBURG DIVISION

-ON CAMPUS INTERVIEW JANUARY 25

SOUTH QUAD QUADRANTS HONORARY
Is pleased to announce these new members in recognition of
Outstanding Service and Participation in South Quad.

This may be the chance you have
been waiting for - an exceptional
professional opportunity with an in-
dustry pace-setter on Florida's sub-
tropical Gulf Coast in St. Petersburg.
For qualified graduates in elec-
tronic engineering, ECI offers excel-
lent career opportunities in such areas
of advanced development and design
as coding, modulation, digital com-
munications, microelectronics, RF com-
munications technology and satellite
systems.
ECI is a recognized leader in com-
mand and control systems, minia-
turized transmitters and receivers,
multiplex systems and space instru-

mentation. With 2000 employees, ECI
is large enough to offer the facilities,
programs and security you are seek-
ing, but small enough to stress indi-
vidual achievement and to give you
every opportunity to realize your
capabilities to the fullest.
As a member of ECI's professional
team, you will be encouraged to con-
tinue your education with postgradu-
ate study. ECI offers a full tuition re-
fund.
Visit the placement office today
and make an appointment to talk
with Electronic Communications, Inc.
on Thursday, January 25th.

Rich Bond
Quentin Fisher
Jim Green

Tony Jesurun
Mary Kelly
Paul Milgrom

Nancy O'Reilley
Maree Russo
Thomas Smith

So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal buffet for interested electronic engi-
neering students and their ladies at the Ambassador Restaurant,
Statler Hilton Inn, beginning at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday evening,
n 1 1 l l -- I -. --- 1-- - - . L - --- -I- - - .. :. -

Eif I !I1.

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