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January 18, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19. 1968

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUF..yl~R/DAY . JA~d.*VARY 1RAUThR

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cinema
Mickey One' Passes 'Bonnie and Clyde'

I

Across Campus

i

V

By ELLEN FRANK
One of the most rewarding out-
comes of the success of "Bonnie
and Clyde" is a reapprisal of the
earlier works of its director, Ar-
thur Penn. "Mickey One" - a
critical success at the 1965 New
York Film Festival, but a com-
mercial failure - is thankfully
joining inthe revival at the Fifth
FOrum.
""From the Star, Producer and
Director of 'Bonnie and Clyde' "
should not be resented as an ad-
vertising lure. "Mickey One"
stands on its own, yet retains not-
able* features from Penn's "Bon-

nie and Clyde" and "The Left
Handed Gun," a late 1950's in-
terpretation of the Billy the Kid
legend, starring Paul Newman.
These three films, which Penn
himself has said are his best, all
deal with violence, particularly
the crime-pursuit-capture pattern
directed toward the individual
whom Penn consistently refuses
to call a "criminal." The direc-
tor's unique attitude toward his
heroes is capsilized by a few re-
marks in "Mickey One"
Mickey's girlfriend asks him if he
really is guilty. He replies, "What
does that mean? Isn't guilt sim-

ply the absence of innocence?"
Mickey One himself is a
strange hero. His "crime" is ow-
ing debts - but he never knows
how much he owes, why he does,
who he owes it to, and who is
chasing him. Nonetheless, he
flees, from the moment the cred-
its end to the mysterious ending
-where one has to assume he
has been caught.
At no point does Penn lose con-
trol over this long chase scene. He
sets the tone with the film's first
line - "There is no place you
can hide - you'll have to be an
animal."

The Cryonics Society of Michi-
Mickey becomes an animal - gan will hold a meeting today to
turned loose and running by in- discuss post-mortem congelation.
stinct through Detroit bars and Boyce Rensinger, science editor
Chicago nightclubs. He is very of the Detroit Free Press, John
different from Penn's other Erfurt of the Institute for Social
heroes, because he is not at all in Research and R. C. Ettinger,
conflict or even in touch with so- author of "The Prospect of Im-
ciety, the law, the establishment. mortality" will be among the
Mickey is running in a maze of participants at the meeting.
the underworld of the mob, The discussion will consider
nightclubs, sleezy hotels. He is "When should the doctor give up"
not fighting anything, he is run- and "When is death irreversible,"
ning - and he never knows from among other aspects of cryonics.
what. Those interested in attending
Penn makes this isolation mas- should call 761-4916 or 426-4037.
terfully clear. Only rarely doesM
he need bother directly stating it,
such as in the scene where Mickey Martha MacNeal Zweig, grad-
seeks protection from the police, uate of The tniversity of Michi-
who reply, "Is it a gambling debt? gan, and winner of several Hop-
Don't worry, kid - there's no wood Awards, has recently pub-
gambling allowed in Chicago." lished two poems in the January

-music
Royal Philharmonic Potential
Marred by Lacking Distinction

universities to train much-needed
executive and administrative per-
sonnel for community colleges.
The Midwest Council is a co-
operative venture of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, Michigan State
University, and Wayne State Uni-
versity. It has received substan-
tial support in the past from the
Kellogg Foundation and from the
three universities.
* * *
Two University of Michigan
professors have been awarded a
one-year grant of $46,075 by the
Carnegie Corp. of New York for
interuniversity research on resi-
dential undergraduate student
units.
T h e project's co-directors,
Theodore M. Newcomb, professor
of sociology and associate direc-
tor of the University's Residential
College, and Donald R. Brown,
professor of psychology and re-
search associate at the U-M Cen-
ter for Research on Learning and
Teaching, have already collabor-
ated with researchers and offi-
cials at several universities which
have launched residential col-
leges.

DIAL
5-6290

1 qqpqM

a

cilaamda

SHOWS AT
1, 3,5,
7, 9 P.M.

"The Tension Is Terrific !"
-N.Y. TIMES
"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat 1"
--MICHIGAN DAILY

AN IMPORTANT HAPPENING
weekend of Feb. 2-4
at St. Paul of the Cross Retreat House
23333 Schoolcraft, DETROIT
For college men-7:00 P.M. Friday till 2:00 P.M. Sunday
talks-discussions-guitar lessons--good food--rest
You are invited--Free will offering
For information and/or reservation
Call 535-9563

By R. A. PERRY
Founded by the late ebullient
4 $ rhomas Beecham, the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra flounder-
ed at the maestro's death, and
never, regained its solidarity under
the baton. of a single outstanding.
conductor. Now. touring the States
under the leadership of Vaclav
Neumann, George Groves, and, be-
lieve it. or not, Skitch Henderson,
the RPO shows precipient great-
ness: excellent first-chair poten-
tial and a sense for aural rich-
pes, but a weakening lack of any
distinctive, style or apparent in-
spired commitment..
It was fitting that the British
group should open the concert
with a work by one of their musi-
cal demigods, Benjamin Britten.
Vaclav 'Neumann, previous' con-
ductor of Prague and Leipzig or-
chestras, conjured up an evocative
performance of the seldom heard
Sinfonia da Requiem. Composed
for the 2,500th anniversary of the
Mikado's dynasty (talk of com-
missions!), the work was even-
tually turned down by the Japanese
on religious grounds and first per-
formed in New York in 1941.
The concept of the Requiem
has come a long way from the
religiosity of Mozart's Requiem
Mass, and many of the. greatest
Requiems were composed in the
nineteenth century. Verdi's Man-
zoni Requiem dramatically explor-
ed the possibilities of both horror
and sweetness in the afterlife;
Brahms Requiem serenely sent the
deceased (and occasionally the
audience) off into the land of sleep.
Britten was one of the first to
exclude the chorus and to compose
a purely orchestral work.
Student or Teacher
to do library
research at University
of Michigan Library
Prefer library science major,
$3.00 per hour.
Write'M.I.S., RAO Box 5129,.
Grasse Pointe,'Michigan 48236 ,

Without human voices, the Re-
quiem plan becomes somehow de-
personalized, which is in keeping
with Britten's twentieth century
effort to more lament the scarey
wasteland of life than promise
the eternal sanctuary of an after-
life. A mystic like Messiaen, to re-
assert the religious, had eventually
to explode in volume and quantity
the existential angst portrayed by
Britten's music.
Another aspect of Britten's
music which is typically twentieth
century can be seen in the abstract
visual connotations that the music
evokes. How well the Lacrymosa
could serve as a sound "tract for
a film on Hiroshima, or the Dies

Irae for a documentary on traf-
fic management. Nothing could
"illustrate" Mozart's Requiem.
This intends not to demean the
music, but to intimate that more
sentiment exists here than the
music admits to.
There ought to be an interna-
tional committee to limit the num-
ber of performances of Brahms
symphonies. Last night, the ex-
cesses and torpor of Brahms
Fourth were only accentuated by
a reading which lacked linear plas-
ticity and dynamic modulation.
The University Musical Society
is to be congratulated on bringing
the RPO to Ann Arbor, and chast-
ised for its failure to provide pro-
gram notes.

Penn intertwines Mickey in a
dense, circular world, where ma-
chines, the mob and even his girl-
friend seem to turn on him. The
futility of running from the un-
known is wonderfully accented by
the presentation and representa-
tion of mysterious characters,
such as the deaf mute who keeps
coming back to remind Mickey to
cotninue fleeing.
"Mickey One," well known in
Europe as the best of American
films, is in many ways superior
to "Bonnie and Clyde." It is a far
richer film, employing every pos-
sible device, including music by
Stan Getz and the noises of the
city, to stress Mickey's strange
guilt and flight.

issue of "Poetry," "Poetry" is1
considered by many poets as thej
high mark of periodical publica-
tion. Miss Zweig's poetry has fre-;
quently appeared in "Genera-
tion", the campus inter-arts mag-
azine, and in 1966, "Generation"<
presented her in a reading of hert
own work. The two poems appear-
ing in "Poetry" were read at that1
time. Much of Miss Zweig's poetry
is imagistic, and is particularly
memorable for being freshly con-
ceived and cleanly articulated.
* * *
A grant of $84,000 from the
W. K. Kellogg Foundation of
Battle Creek to the Midwest
Community College Leadership
Council will assist three Michigan

I

I

L

WAIT UNTIL DARK]

AUDREY HEPBURN'
ALM'ARMN
RICHMD CRENNA

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MONDAY
TUFSDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
7 :00-9 :00

4 3Di 4
3020 WASHTENAW il44182

WEDNESDAY
SATU.IRDAY
SUNDAY
1-3-5-7-9

............._._

NATIONAL GENERAL CORP'ORATION
NO FOX EASTERN THEA
SHOWING FO VILL 5E
375 No. MAPLE RD. '769-1300
leave the children home.

DOORS OPEN 6:30
MONDAY-FRI DAY
TIMES: 7:00-9:00

AELIZABE
TAYLOR
MLON
BRANDO
IN THE JOHN HUSTON-RAY STARK PRODUCTION
REFLECTIONS
NAGOLDEN EYE
~SAT., SUN. TIMES: 1:15-3:15-5 :15-7:00-9:00

He's a crook, an embezzler,
a con man, a forger
TH
CORPORATION
presents
Tk
Li..
al;
A WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION ITS
COLOR by Deluxe PANAVISfON r'
SOON! "THE HAPPIEST MILLIONAIRE"
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ERRYMOORENMRRAY S LA N DAE
NPLAY D ECTEBRODUCELOBY
MItI OIL ABDHRIHAD IIE[ JAMES P[AiMAand RRERi S. LKIEY RINPO RRSH -EHIS M HRB W11l F ? MR A RIPPS
--InM ETROCOLOR M

Program
Information
NO 2-6264
E -NEmms##N

See Fea
Q9TATE
EM. 71c;i:.....

ture at 0

1:30-3:30-5:30
7:30-9:34

';:}v:S;:r;:;Y:':v::"i.^: 'r?'r'{:;=::;.i{.r . k}'. :{;ti';"?{;C;:$?; ; S;{5," ? ',tS, {f a'SF: =;:

- -J

ER

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/

presents
Thor Johnson
and the
Chicago Lttle Symphony
,j
SAT., JAN. 20, 8:30
IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUME
I Program: Symphony No 6 in D major ("Le Matin") Haydn
Pastorale d'ete...... ................. . Honegger
Five Pieces for Small Orchestra (1962) Wallace Berry
(Commissioned for the Chicago Little Symphony)
Concerto for Flute and Orchestra.... . ...........Ibert
Symphonic Concertante for
Violin and Viola.. Karl Stamitz
Danses Concertantes ... ... . . .... . . ... Stravinsky
TICKETS: $5.00$4.00,-$2.005
at -
U University Musical Society, Burton Tower
Hours: Mon. thru Fri, 9 to 4:30; Sat. 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(also at Rackhom Aud., 1 1/2 hours preceeding performances)
+S ".::::..a r:"v".......... : I

DIAL
8-64 16

fa-im,

TONIGHT
at
7 &9 P.M.

Vth Forum

:ff
"THE CR(OWD SURiST INTO APPLAUSE MORE TflAN
2~5 T#ME$,IN 9-$ANTE " ~ *MF5T~L rLi
:AS JOYOS AN ILLUMINATING A FiLM AS $ C)URRENTLY
TO E EN" A TIMES
"EXCITEMENT OF YOU.TH SEARCHING FOR
.SELF £XRESSION." irtNvs
TWAT EXTRAOFWINARY SC0-CtULTURAL HAPPENING
IN ALL ITS RAIMUNCT3US SPONTANEITY,"-N. 'T
>A TRIP EMINENTLY WOfRTH TAKING. "-N. Y. POST'
"~SHARPEDGEn HONE$Y WHICH INDUCES ONE TO WIS
IT W#UW GO ON I EFINITELY".'-RA ! CIENCE
AN EYE OPENNG MOTION PICTURE
A Fitt M =T NDJY WI IM MAT THE NMI EWFOR T = FYAI.
STARRING
JOAN BAEZ - DONOVAN'"BOB DYLAN PETER, PAUL & MARY
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL PRIZE WINNER-RELEASED BY PEPPERCORN WORMSER INC. PRINTS BY MOVIE LAB

NEW SHOW TIME POLICY:
CONVENIENT MATINEES Every Day-LATE SHOWS at 11:00 Every Fri. & Sat.
MON. thru THUR. Shows, 2:30, 7:00, 9:00. FRI., SAT. & SUN. continuous from 1:00
FRI. & SAT. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00, 11 :00-SUN. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

LAST DAY TO SEE WARREN BEATTY IN "MICKEY ONE"
THE MAKERS OF "BONNIE AND CLYDE" PRESENT
WARREN BEATTY

.4

210 S. FIFTH AVE.-761-9700
Between Washington and Liberty

Are you uncertain, questioning,
and confused -about your faith?
COME LISTEN AND
DISCUSS WITH US.
T H E SEARCH
FOR FAITH
presented by:
DR. CALVIN MALEFYT j
JAN. 19 at-7:30 P.M.
UGLI Multipurpose Room
3rd floor
Sponsored by:Michigan
Christian Fellowship
KEEP FREEDOM

...: .: ::,: :... "::: ........ ...:: 7....n 7 :.:. ii??:,}:-.?:.
.....,..:....o£.-.:......,..<xx:....x2x................2}&.... . 5 . 7 ,";7. .. * '.. -:.3v; ...::::::. ss.....,7ii.'......::'i{_.$.7 ' " '5 ' '
.5 .. /7Creative Arts Festival
~ ~ presents
~ ~7//. .MIRIAM MAKEB
' ~ ~ . "77.Sin concert
~1>.Saturday, January 27 . .. 8:30- Hilll
"~" /Block ticket sales: Individual sales:
v - to A AA ! ._I n"l/ AA !_._' I "

'I

SUPE R B! Stunningly put to-
gether and uncommonly well
played! Arthur Penn has put
extraordinary scenes on film!
Warren Beatty's performance is
original and brilliant!"!
- NEWSWEEK
''Arthur Penn has made an American
f im that raised the N.Y. Film Festival
to rare heights, a brilliant screen work,
visually exciting and intellectually
satisfying.
"'Mickey One' is told in stark,fast-mov-
ing nightmare terms that sparkle with
cinematic excitement and is marked
by total artistry.
"A rich film, and its rewards are
equally rich! MOVIE-MAKING AT
ITS BEST!"! -JUITH GRISTb.
"THE MOST EXCITING FILM OF
THE NEW YORK FILM FESTI-
VAL! Arthur Penn's most brilliant
movie.'.his most daring! Warren
Beatty gives the best perfor-
mance of his career!"
-JOSEPH GELMIS.
Long Island Newsday
e

,

U

RINGING

4

Columbia Pictures presents

Mal e AIR

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