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January 17, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-17

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PAGE EIGTTT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1968

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17. 1968

STATE OF THE. UNION:
Johnson's Address
May Answer Hanoi.

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DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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WASHINGTON (A) - Advance
interest in President Johnson's
election year State of the Union
address today is centering on
what he may say about prospects
for peace in Vietnam.
With war costs acting as a
damper on big new domestic
spending proposals, a key question
is whether Johnson will deal di-
rectly with a recent indication
from Hanoi that a bombing halt
over North Vietnam would lead
to some kind of talks.
It seemed almost certain John-
son would feel compelled to take
up this situation when he appears
before Congress and, via tele-
vision and radio, before the vot-
ers - at 9 p.m. (EST) today.
Traditionally, the annual ad-
dress is a summing up of admin-
istration legislative proposals plus
a broad review of the plans and
hopes of the executive branch in
areas foreign and domestic.
Johnson will talk, at least in
general terms, about some new
ideas for domestic legislation.
LBJ Budget
Held Under
$190 Billion
WASHINGTON () - President
Johnson will submit to Congress
a total spending program defi-
nitely below $190 billion for the
fiscal year which begins July 1,
informed sources said yesterday.
Included in this would be ad-
ministrative spending- the basis
most commonly used in recent
years - ranging about $11 billion
or $12 billion above the current
fiscal year, it was learned.
Anticipated Increase
Officials have said the antici-
pated increase stems from laws
already on the books and includes
increased interest on the federal
debt, newly enacted federal pay
raises, increased payments to the
states for the medicaid program
and other similar rises.
Key members of the House
.Ways and Means Committee have
said they want assurance of a
holddown in spending before ask-
ing the House to approve a 10 per
cent tax surcharge as proposed
by Johnson. 'Another hearing is
set for next Monday.
Unified Budget
Complicating the budget pre-
sentation this year is a new
format which will lump all spend-
ing into a,unified budget. It in-
cludes not only the familiar ad-
ministrative budget but spending
from the government operated
trust funds such as Social Secur-
ity and highways.
The budget, scheduled to be
sent to Congress Jan. 29, will pro-
pose a spending figure under $190
billion but in that range, a source
said.
As for the more familiar admin-
istrative budget, informed sources
said it is expected to run between
$145 billion and $10 billion but
appears to be settling closer to
the middle of that range.
Johnson could disclose official-
ly some of the budget figures
when he delivers his State of the
Union message to Congress to-
night.

There will be new anti-crime pro-
posals, for example, and addition-
al suggestions for consumer pro-
tection laws. The administration
sees potential November voter
support in both areas.
The chief executive also will re-
new his plea for early passage of
a 10 per cent income tax sur
charge. But he won't, at this
point, spell out specific proposals
for a companion measure aimed
at strengthening the dollar by
curbing foreign exchange losses
due to the spending of American
tourists abroad.r
Financial Pinch9
In the main, new domestic pro-
posals would not entail massive
federal spending, at least on an
immediate basis. The financialf
pinch of the war - and the moodc
of Congress - rule out any major1
increase in social welfare outlays
in the new budget, going to Con-
gress -within a couple of weeks.
Individual special messages de-
tailing new administration pro-c
posals will be sent to Congress
over a period of several weeks,
starting soon after Johnson's ap-i
pearance there.I
Tight Lida
However, the White House is
expected to hold back for several
months on advancing any major
new plans for dealing with the
ills of the cities, pending a March
report from Johnson's Advisoryi
Commission on Civil Disorders.I
The White House was trying to
keep a tight lid on the whole
range of Johnson's State of the
Union text, still undergoing revi-
sion. It was particularly careful to
avoid dropping clues involving
passages dealing with Vietnam.
In Saigon, there were uncon-
firmed rumors that Johnson had
written a new personal message
to Premier Ho Chi Minh of North
Vietnam - the kind of messageI
he might want to make known
before a national radio and tele-
vision audience.
When press secretary George
Christian was asked if such a
message had been dispatched, he1
responded, "I don't have any com-
ment on that.";
God To .Face
$25,000 Suit
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -
George Albrecht has filed a
$25,000 damage suit against God,
charging He was responsible for
a 1964 accident in which Albrecht
injured his back.
Albrecht, in the suit filed Mon-
day, names as co-defendants all
Palm Beach County churches -
about 30 of them - because he
said they were "the agents of
God."
The 35-year-old electrician said
he injured his back in 1964 when
he was standing on a sidewalk
that suddenly collapsed and
dumped him into a pit.
Albrecht sued the city and the
construction company, but a trial
jury ruled the mishap was "an
act of God."
He charged in the suit filed
Monday that "as a result of this
act of God . . . this plaintiff re-
ceived damages to his back .
from which he will continue to
suffer permanently."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an ies of nuclear activities including pow- F. Any degree, any major for Mgmt.
official publication of the Univer- er production. Trng., Sales, Finance, Computer Syst.I
slty of Michigan for which The New research ideas and pilot pro- Joseph T. Ryerson and Son, Chicago,c
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- jects are partiularly encouraged. The Ill.-M & F. BA Anthro., Chem., Econ.,
ial responsibility. Notices should be relationship to peaceful uses of nu- Educ., Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ.,I
sent in TYPEpWRITTEN form to clear energy, however, must be clear. Math, Philo., Poll. Sci., Psych. and Soc. I
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- The routine use of isotope tracer tech- for Adv., EDP, Mgmt Trng., Person.,
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding niques will not by itself justify sup- Produc., Sales and Secretarial.r
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday port. Burroughs Wellcome & Co., Inc.,
for Saturday and Sunday. General Requests for grants of $3,000 or less Tuckahoe, N.Y.-All degrees and allf
Notices may be published a maxi- are most appropriate. Grants may majors for Territ. Sales.
mum of two times on request; Day cover equipment, supplies, research Vista, Wash., D.C.-See Mon. listing.
Calendar items appear once only, assistance, and field trips. Applications Avondale Public Schools, Auburv
Student organization notices are not for these grants should be returned to Heights Mich.-Head Bookkeeper, M or
accepted for publication. For more the Phoenix Project by Monday, Jan. F. Prefer acctg. courses, exper. pref.
information call 764-9270. 29, 1968. Grants will be made by April Local Firm--Manufacturing Agency
1, 1968. seeking someone to take over agency,
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17 Application blanks may be obtained represents 5 manufacturers of auto
from the office of the Phoenix Project parts, sells autos after-market, ware-
at the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory housing set-up, travel 6 nights mo.
on the North Campus or by calling Man.
Da C le dar 764-6213. Eastern Airlines, Detroit, Mich.-Sales
Representative, dev. potential in terri-
Bureau of Industrial Relations Semi- ATTENTION STUDENTS: tory by personal calls upon travel
nar-"Management of Managers No Applications for 1968-69 General Un- agents, traffic managers and other
47": North Campus Commons, 8:15 dergraduate Scholarships are now avail- accounts, some out-of-town travel,
a~m. to 5:00 p.. and 7:00 to 9:00 pm.able in the reception area of 2011 Stu- man, BA degree, exper. not req.
._: . _ : :dent Activities Building. Only those Harvey Aluminum Sales, Inc., Lath-
Departments of Zoology and Botany students who will have an overall rup Village, Mich.-Sales Engineer (3),
Lectures in Developmental Biology _ gradepoint average of 3.0 or better at non-ferrous metal, sales to metal
Dr. Colin Pittendrigh, Professor of the end of 1968 Winter term with 14 working industry, local travel only.
Biology, Princeton University, "Cira- or more Michigan hours and who have Man, BS/BA, pref. metallurgy, exper.{
dian Rhythms and Photoperiodism": substantial financial need should ap- pref.-
Auditorium C. ply. (A present 'overall average of 2.9 Local Publisher-Editor for quarterly
or better is required to apply.) publication. hours flexible, M or F,
Anatomy Seminar - Dr. Domonic BA in Engl. or Design.
D. Dziewiatkowski, Chairman, Depart- Doctoral Examination for: Robert Minneapolis Civil Service Commission,
ment of Oral Biology; Director, Dental Dean Erwin, Business Administration, Minn., Min.-Health Planner, MPA,
Research Institute, U of M, "Obser- Thesis. "An evaluation of Item Profit- MSW, MA Hosp. Admin., Psych .orn1
vations On The Transformation of ability Analysis by Department Stores," rltd. behav, sci. plus 3 years exper. in
Cartilage To Bone," 2501 East Medical on Wednesday, Jan. 17 at 1 p.m. in community health.
Bldg., 4:00 p.m. 8th floor Conference Room, Business Wisconsin Civil Service - Research
____-__ Administration Bldg.; Co-Chairmen: Analyst, Health Planner, Dept. of
Statistics Seminar - Professor Wil- C. M. Crawford, and E. H. Gault. Health and Social Serv. BA in math,
Iam Root (Aerospace Engineering) will stat., pub. health or biol/soc. sci., sev-
. ; eras years exper., 3 in public health.
pa ofinear Gauscsian chneelsfor a rt c men MA subs. for 2 years work exper.,
at 4:00 p.m. in room 3201 Angell Hall. INTERVIEWING WEEK OF JAN. 22-26; aknokes Theath daIncresBloomington
Writer-in-Residence - Irving Howe, Please make appts. as sodn as pos- Ind. - Announcer, mature capable.
"Anarchy and Authority In American sible, deadline is 4:00 day preceding Semi-Conductor Device Dev. Engr., EE,
Literature," Angell Hall, Aud. A, 4:10 the interview. Resume forms are ex- Phys., ME, or Chem. plus 1 year in
pm. ,r pected by all employers on candidates. transistor or diode dev. Fld. Serv. Engr.,
p.m. Monday, Jan. 22: travel. Other engrg. positions in TV
. Defense Intelligence Agency, Wash., Div., Electronics, Broadcast. Technical
The University Lecturer in Journal- D.C.-M & F, BA/MA Languages, Geog., Wie.Pyiit st oCroae
ism (series) - Morris L. Ernest, civil C-M&F.B/ALnugsGegWriter,. Physicist. Asst. to Corporate
isbseries) ttor, forr S.peil Dep- Geol., Math, Forestry, Phys., and Area Paymaster. Q.C. Stat. ALal. ChE. Cam-
libt Attorney General of New York Studies for EDP, Cartography, Trans., puter Operator.
u Cty, "TheFirsFreedomRevisite Programming, Overseas Programs,In- 4 , *
Citedy, The .FistFredomD Rnevisited. telligence Analyst, and Research Aid. SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE,
Wednesday, Jan. 17, Aud. D Angel Hall, Vista, Wash., D.C.-Here all week in2A B., LAweeTeE
4:10 p.m. Room 3524 S.A.B., 9-12 . and 1:30-4:30, S.A.B., Lower Level
Religion and Literature Seminar - no appts. or entrance examinations Feb.d -Final Date for Applications
"Theology and Imaginative Literature- requ. Organizations or classes wish- for Federal Government Work. Appli-
Consd ideationsLruid ing to have Vista speakers contact cations at S.P.S.
Some Basie Considerations, Guild Bureau immediately. Interview Today, Jan. 17 - Cook
House, 802 Monroe St., 7:30 p.m. 'xuesday, Jan. 23: Paint and Varnish Co., Detroit, Mich.
CinemaeGuild - Experimental Film Defense Intelligence Agency, Wash, Chem. students for lab technicians.
D.C.-See Monday listing. Till 5:00 p.m.
Program No. 1: Architecture Auditor- Vista, Wash., D.C.-See Monday list- Jan. 18 - Foreign Students, TheJ
ium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. Ig. Stewardship Council, Phila., Pa.-For
Wednesday, Jan. 24: students as, leaders for summer camps
University Musical Society - Royal Inland Steel Co., Chicago, III.-M & and conferences all over U.S.

Jan. 19-Pine River Canoe Camp,
Mich.-Boys. Sr. counselors. Resident,a
camp spec, is canoeing.
Friday, Jan. 19 - Southwestern Co.,
Nashville, Tenn.-Selling job brings in
Big Money. Representative interview-
ing from 2-5 p.m. every Friday after-
noon, see him for details.
Come to S.P.S., 212 S.A.B., Lower Level
for details and applications.
*. * *
SUMMER JOBS IN WASHINGTON:
There are openings with the United
States Information Agency. Applicants
must be at least juniors with speciali-

zation in Radio-TV, foreign language,1
or any other communications skill. In-
terested students call the Washington
Summer Intern Program at 1516
Rackham Building, at 764-3492.
*, * *
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVlCE:
Make Interview Appointments at
Room 128-H. West Engrg. Bldg. unless
otherwise specified.
Jan. 24:
Applied Physics Lab.-Johns Hopkins
University.
The Boeing Co.
Carrier Corp.-Research Div.

Consumers Power Co
Dravo Corp
General Mills. Inc
General Motors Corp
General Radio Co.
Johnson & Johnson
The Mead Corp.
McDonnell Douglas Corp.-St. Louis,
Mo.
The Trane Co.
U.S. Dept. of the Air Force - Air
Force Logistics Command.
Vista (Volunteers in Service to
America)-No appt. necessary-Room
3524 Student Activities Bldg.

FAST READING IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
-save hours, use your time more efficiently
--learn to read 3 to 1 0 times faster than you do now
-improve your comprehension and increase your
enjoyment of reading material
Bring a book to a live demonstration of the
reading skills which will be taught in a
GUARANTEED course offered this semester.
Demonstrations this week Mon., Tues. and Thurs., Jan. 15, 16 and 18.
7:30 P.M. at Bell Tower Inn, 300 S. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower.
A UV / A A00
"he Welfare State: A Radilcal Vew
(An Analysis of Contemporary
American Society)
AUDITORIUM A-7:30 P.M.
sponsOred by social work students
IRV.ING HOWE
Writer-in-Residence '68

Philharmonic Orchestra of London- -
Vaciav Neumann, Conductor: Hill Aud-
itorium, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Colloquia in Education - Dr. Fritz
Redl, Professor at Large of Behavioral
Sciences, Wayne State University.r"The
Emotional Problems of Children in
School," January 18, University Elemen-
tary School Cafeteria, 4:00 p.m.
Political Science 433 Make-Up Exam
on Monday, Jan. 22 at 3 p.m. in Room
245 Physics & Astronomy.
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Pro-
ject invites requests for faculty re-
search grants to support research with-
in the scope of the term "peaceful
uses of nuclear energy." Typical areas
in which the Project is interested
are: Biological effects of radiation,
Radiation dosimetry, New uses of iso-
topes, New tracer techniques, Direct
conversion of nuclear energy to elec-
trical energy, The fusion process,
Plasmas as related to controlled fu-
sion, Radiation chemistry, Nuclear
weapons proliferation and disarma-
ment, Psychological attitudes toward
nuclear energy hazards, Evaluation of
hazards to urban populations from
nuclear activities, and Economic stud-

ORGANIZATION NOTICES

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAB.
- *
Baha'l Student Group, informal dis-
cussion, "Baha'u'llah, The Promised
One of All Ages," Fri., Jan. 19, 8:00
p.m., 520 N. Ashley. All welcome. Call
662-3548 if you need transportation.
Young Americans for Freedom will
hold a general membership meeting at
3:30 p.m., Sun., Jan. 21 in, the third
floor conference room of the Union.
"The Conservative Union" will be
discussed. All members should attend.
UM Scottish Country Dance Society
meeting every Wednesday, 8:00 p.m. to
10:30 p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg. Be-
ginners welcome. Instruction given.
* * a
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Wed., Jan. 17, 10:00 p.m.,

Mid-week devotion with Pastor Kapfer.
Holy Communion will be celebrated.
UM Amateur Radio Club meeting,
Jan. 17, 7 p.m., Room 2080 East Engi-
neering Bldg.

College Republican Meeting, Jan. 17,
7:30 p.m., Rm. 3 R-S Union, speaker:
Congressman Marvin Esch.

4
e

..Southern Asian Club-Bag lunch at
noon on Friday, Jan. 19. Prof. Walter
Spink will speak and show slides on
"Indian and Western Art: Some Com-
parisons." The program will be held in
Room 201, Lane Hall.

k
I

Join a service project at
YPSILANTI STATE HOSPITAL
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20
9 A.M.-5 P.M.
(and continuing throughout the term every other Saturday)
For Information and Applications, Contact
PAT GREEN-763-0739
BART BEAVIN-668-6881
SHIRLEY LEWIS--662-5529
Sponsored by the Association of Religious Counselors

STUCK WITH AN
APARTMENT TO SUBLET
FOR THIS SUMMER?
Here's How Tc Rent It Quick Through The'
Michigan Daily's "Student Housing Guide"
EXAMPLE

DEADLINE-
FRIDAY, FEB. 2
The quickest and easiest
way to sublet your pad
is through The Daily's
special apartment
supplement to be published
Sunday, February 11th
For only$5
you can place a
1 Col. x 4"
advertisement with a
guaranteed circulation of

THE FINEST
IN
APARTMENT
LIVING
MODERN 4-MAN APT.
with central air-con-
ditioning and heating,
garbage disposal,
parking lot facilities,
large front view
picturerwindow,
completely furnished,
live-in manager.
2 large Bedrooms
CALL 769-3247

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CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS I
NEXT IWEEK X
Graduates at all degree levels
are urged to investigate
the career opportunities at
The world's largest center
for conquest of disease '
and improvement of human health .
The National Institutes of Health-NIH-is the principal research
arm of the U.S. Public Health Service, and conducts many of the
most advanced programs in medical science today. These pro-
grams require specialists in a wide range of disciplines. Ex-
ample: Right now NIH has openings in the following areas:
CHEMISTS . . . BIOLOGISTS . . . NURSES . . . MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGISTS . . . SOCIAL WORKERS . . . LIBRARIANS
... ENGINEERS ... COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS... MATH-
EMATICIANS ... STATISTICIANS ... SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
..MANAGEMENT INTERNS ... PERSONNEL SPECIALISTS
-- ACCOUNTANTS . . . INFORMATION SPECIALISTS ...
MANAGEMENT ANALYSTS . . . CONTRACT SPECIALISTS
These are permanent positions that offer high professional
challenge and the benefits of career Federa) employment. Start-
ing salaries are attractive and opportunity for advancement is
excellent.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS February 7
An NIH representative will be visiting your campus next week
to discuss these positions with interested students. You may
arrange an interview irinn this visit by contactino the Place-

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