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January 17, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-17

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1PAt".V. %rVlFV,

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1968 TIlE )IICIIIGAN DAILY DAfir ar~-m'~y

i u G r. r..ti

T1lE VANDALS
AND THE
BROKEN IEADS
... Howard Kohn
I didn't want to bring this up before, because you know how
rumors are once they get going . . . inciting people to riots and
crucifixions and developing into movements and all that sort of thing.
But, in good conscience, I can't keep this from you much longer.
Unlike most people, especially Christians, Dr. Ira Eshleman
believes in the Bible.
Eshleman also believes he is the chaplain of pro football.
He has held services for the Green Bay Packers in all of their
playoff games including Sunday's victory over a league which Pete
Rozelle says is not inferior to the big leagues.
Eshleman's pre-picked favorites, however, were the Baltimore
Colts. During the regular season, flanker Willie Richardson led the
prayer during one of Eshleman's morning vespers and then caught
the winning touchdown for the Colts in the afternoon.
From then on, Eshleman was fond, of saying, "Only God
knows for sure."
This raises an interesting point:
Many psychologists claim that people relate events because they
happen simultaneously. When Malcolm X, for example, predicted that
his enemies would die in an air crash, his followers believed him and
a week later a plane carrying several Southern politicians did crash.
Jesus' prophecies, as vaguely disguised as some were, also came
true.
He said that his friends would turn against him, and they did
and still do.
He also said that the meek would inherit the earth.
Eshleman, a large rambling man with a Bear Bryant drawl, un-
fortunately is not a meek man.
Accustomed to the hand-clapping and feet-stomping of Southern
revival meetings, he ministered as an evangelist, founding a highly
profitable "Bible Town" in Boca Raton, Fla.
He retired from the professional ranks last April. Subsequently
he became bored, latched on as one of America's chaplains at Expo 67
and then announced he was organizing non-sectarian Sunday morn-
ing services for Sunday afternoon's non-believers.
Joe Schmidt of the Detroit (Plimpton) Lions was a most
forthright skeptic, asking him to first experiment on the coaches,
before he would enroll his team in the services.
"This a $10 million capital investment we're talking about. We
can't afford to have it psychologically off for a game," Schmidt
explained.
Vhen the Lions felled the Giants, however, schmidt called
Eshleman into the post-game lockerroom to lead a prayer while he
t and his players knelt on their knees
"I've seen it in high school and college but never in professional
football," exclaimed Eshleman later.
"Today's athletes are fed 'up with the caricature of religion
they found in churches back home. They want reality in religion.
"Besides, while most church people do a lot of talking about
ecumenicalism, these players are already practicing it," he added.
Players reactions were highly nebulous-as always-except for
Willie Richardson who was also fond of saying, "Only God knows
for sure."
This raise another interesting point:
Henry Adams often wondered what this inscription meant,
"No one means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean."
This was because Jesus had said that the peacemakers would be
called the sons of God..
Eshleman, who thought about going to Vietnam because he had
served as a chaplain during World War II, believes "it is better to
have violence on the football field than in the streets."
Jesus, a Jew born of ignorant Jewish parents, on the other hand,
was a rabble-rauser. Consequently he died of violence on the streets.
However, Jesus' followers, who later became Christians, were
convincedhe was a peacemaker and called him the Son of God.
They were fond of saying, "Only God knows for sure."
This raises another interesting point:
Jesus did not want to leave the Garden of Gethsemane for the
court of Pontius Pilate and the cross of Mount Calvary. Neither man
nor woman wanted to leave the Garden of Eden. Neither players nor
fans want to leave the football field.
k Many psychologists claim that this is man's desire to return
to the womb. Jesus, being descended from the Father although he
was always one with the Father, was fond of saying, "Only God
knows for sure."
This raises another interesting point:
Whatever happened to the voice crying in the wilderness?
But I digress ...

Purdu
By The Associated Press
LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Sopho-
more Rick Mount scored 33 points
to lead Purdue over weak shoot-
ing rival Indiana 89-60 in Big Ten
basketball last night.
The Hoosiers, who made only 26
of 78 shots from the field, didn't
have a man score in double
figures.
The 6-foot-3 Mount hit half of
his 20 field shots and 13 of 15 free
throws. Over-all the Boilermakers
made 33 of 42 free throws, com-
pared with Indiana's eight of 18.
Tyrone Bedford and 5-10 Bill
Keller grabbed 13 rebounds each
to help Purdue race to an 8-0
lead thatnwidened to 42-29 at
halftime and as much as 87-56
toward the end.
It was Purdue's widest margin
over Indiana since a 47-13 victory
over the Hoosiers in 1934.
Keller finished with 16 points,
while Indiana's Butch Joyner, Joe
Cooke and Rick Atkinson each
scored nine.
Spartans Slip
MADISON, Wis. - Wisconsin's'
scrappy Badgers, led by Joe
Franklin's 38 points, snapped aj
two-game losing streak with a 70-
68 victory over Michigan State's
defending Big 10 basketball co-
champions last night.
Franklin, 6-4 jumping jack, keptI
the ragged-playing Badgers in
contention with a 21-point outputI
in the first half.
He added 1-7 points in the sec-
ond half in steering Wisconsin to
its second conference victory
against one loss.
In addition to his career high-j
point output, Franklin snared nine
rebounds in the winning cause.
Wisconsin Coach John Erick-
sin revamped his lineup for the
start of the game and the Badgers
at one time fell eight points behind
the visitor before their attack be-1
gan to jell.

Dunks;

Wisconsin

Slips

By

*

*

*

*

*

Revenge Spurs Gym Competition

By ANDY BARBAS
Michigan's gymnasts competed
against Iowa four times last sea-
son. The results were:
Michigan 188.55, Iowa 188.525.
Iowa 187,05, Michigan 184.87.
Iowa 184.65, Michigan 184.10.
Michigan 187.40, Iowa 186.90.
The first battle was the closest.
Michigan ecked.. out a .025-point
victory to give Iowa its only con-
ference duel-meet loss of the year.
The second clash was the most
tragic. Iowa defeated the Wolver-
ines in the Big Ten Meet, winning
the conference title for itself, and
halting a six year domination by
Michigan.
The third encounter was the
least significant. Iowa toppedj
Michigan, resulting in a second-
place NCAA regional finish for the
Iowans with Michigan finishingj
third.
The fourth match was the
climax. Michigan overcame the
Buckeyes by half a point gaining

at Iowa, is especially enthusiastic.
He described his team as "much
improved. I feel we've improved
25 per cent in some areas and over
50 per cent on the trampoline."
At first glance this seems hard
to believe. The Hawkeyes lost four
men. One, Tom Goldsborough, is
the Big Ten parallel bars cham-
pion. Their sophomores though
seemed to have filled in the gaps
fairly completely, as Iowa's scores
have been in the upper 180's, very
good for this early in the season.
Their record this year is 5-0.
Three Return

Illinois could be the dark horse
of the foursome. They are strong
in most of their events, but do
have a couple of insecure events.
The Illini coach, Charles Pond,
realizes that, "the high bar is a
little. touchy, but our biggest prob-
lem lies in the parallel bars. We're
using sophomores here, and the
inexperience could hurt us."
"I'm especially pleased with our
trampoline team." added Pond.
"Excluding Michigan, which prob-
ably has the world's best team,
ours shouldn't be beaten."
Beat Iowa

TERRY GAMBER

Wildcats Roll
EVANSTON, Ill. - Northwest-I
ern's young Wildcats remained
undefeated in Big Ten basketball
competition with a 77-71 victory;
over Minnesota last night.

Iowa brings back three Big Ten Pond theorized, "The team that
champions, one of whom is also is able to beat Iowa, will win the
the National Collegiate champion. Big Ten title. Iowa, being last
Keith McCanless, a junior, won year's champion, should have a
the national championship in the slight edge."
side horse. Neil Schmitt, a senior, Michigan's State's Szypula gen-
won the Big Ten title in the hori- eraaly agreed, "The team that
zontal bars, while another junior, wins this weekend (Michigan
Don Hatch, is the title -holder in meets Iowa) is the one to beat."
the still rings. Michigan's Newt Loken and
Tramp Weak Iowa's Bailie both expressed sim-

i
13
I
!
';l
ii

Red Sax Cl
As Team o

The victory was the third a second-place finish in the NCAA Iowa's only possible weakness '
straight without defeat for North- Gymnastics Championship and lies in the trampoline. Their scores
western, which is the only team dropping the Buckeyes to third. have not been nearly as good as inf
without a loss in conference Spirited Competition the other events.
action. This year, the competition could Michigan State is worried about
Northwestern led 39-33 at the be even more spirited than last. the same event, the trampoline.
half but found itself in trouble as Not only are Michigan's and Iowa's Otherwise their coach, George
Al Nuness got a hot hand and teams stronger, but Michigan Szypula, notes, "We are well bal-
pulled Minnesota into a 64-all tie State and Illinois, the third and anced in most of the events. If we
in the second half. fourth place finishers in the Big i can improve our trampoline, we
But led by Terry Gamber's 24 Ten last year, both seem to have ' will have a good shot at the title."
points. Northwestern pulled ahead improved versions over their last The Spartans are strongest in
to stay. year's squads. the floor exercise and vaulting.
Nuness took over for Kondla Sam Bailie, the gymnastic coach|Toby Towson, who won the Big
and led all scorers with 30 points, --~- Ten title in the floor exercise last
14 of which came in the closing year, returns for the Spartans.
minutes. The loss was the third L eafs Ed e Along with him is senior Dave
without victory for the Gophers in Thor and sophomore Joe Fedor-
Big1 Tencometiion _____I1 II chik. This outstanding trio is also
't.1k18 " used for vaulting, where Thor be-
comes the best competiter.
TORONTO (P - Ron Ellis'
io e ito comeback and carried the_ _ _ _-
third period goal capped a Toron-, _____________
Maple Leafs to a 4-3 victory over*
e the National Hockey League All-o
IStars last night in the 21st an-
nual ice classic.
for second and one for third. The Leafs, defending Stanleye
The Red Sox, ninth-place fin- Cup champions, overcame a 2-1
ishers in 1966, surprisingly were early deficit on the way to hir
in contention throughout the '67 second victory in seven fappear-
campaign. They trailed Minnesota ances against the All-Star squad,
by one game with two days re- comprised of standouts from the
maining in the season, but swept other 11 NHL clubs. _
a two-game set from the Twins Ellis' conversion of Frank Ma-
and won the pennant by one hovlich's rebound early in the fi-
game over Minnesota and Detroit. nal period gave the Leafs a 4-2
margin. The goal proved decisive
The Top Ten when Norm Ullman of Detroit
slipped a rebound past young Al
1. Boston, baseball 629 Smith, Toronto's back-up goal-
2. St. Louis, baseball 539 tender at the 8:23 mark.
3. UCLA, basketball 311 Smith, who played the final
4. Green Bay, football 212 period in the Leafs' nets after
5. Baltimore, football 119 starting goalie Bruce Gamble
6. Philadelphia, basketball 103 kicked aside 30 shots in the first
7. Oakland, football 77 40 minutes, preserved the victory
8. Los Angeles, football 66 with a lunging save on a Bobby
9. Indiana, football 54 Hull slap shot in the final min-
10. Southern Calif., football 50 ute of play.

ilar feelings towards each other,
"We respect them, but we'll beat
them."

HILLEL DELI HOUSE
WELCOMES
IRVING, HOWE

=============

NEIL SCHMITT

SUNDAY, JAN. 21
Members $1.00

*5:30 P.M.
Non-Members $1.50

iS
f
{4jf(S
,'I
i
.,

To Serve You Better, Hillel Recommends
That You Make Your Reservations for
Deli House now. Call 663-4129, Daily 9,5:30
AND
Following Deli House

i!
+ i'
;
i,

PROF. HOWE will speak on
"YIDDISH LITERATURE*
AND
WORLD LITERATURE"

NEW YORK-The Boston Red
Sox, who emerged as American
League baseball champions after
a spectacular ending to a close
pennant race, were named the
Sports Team-of-the-Year for 1967
yesterday in the annual Associat-
ed Press Poll.
The Red Sox drew 133 first-
place votes and 629 points in the
balloting by 372 sports writers
and broadcasters.
The St. Louis Cardinals, Na-I
tional League baseball titlehold-
ers, were second with 78 first-
place votes and 539 points. UCLA's
national champion college bas-
ketball team placed third with 51
votes for the top position and 311
points.
Points were awarded on a basis
of three for a first-place vote, two

I
I

ii'

DR. HERBERT H. PAPER
6:30 P.M.

R, MODERATOR
*Admission FREE

M

i

"i

I

i

NBA Standings
Eastern Division

I

N HL Standings
East Division

I

Philadelphia
Boston
Detroit
Cincinnati.
New York
Baitimord
Western1
St. Louis
San Francisco.
Los Angeles
*Chicago
Seattle
*San Diego
*Late Game not inc

W 'L
34 12
30 13
24 23
212 23
21 27
16 278
Division
34 13
31 18
22 22
17 30
14 35
13 34
tluded..

Be-
Yet. hind.
.739 -
.698 21/
..511 10.
.489 11f
.438 14
.364 17

Chicago
Boston
Montreal
Toronto
New York
Detroit
Phil'dpia
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Oakland

w
20
22
19
19
18
17

L
10
13
14
14
14
17

T Pts. GF GA
12 52 129 112
6 50 155 124
9 47 121 97
8 46 122 93
8 44 118 109
7 41 140 130

.723
.633
.500
.362
.286
.277

4
10.
17
21
21

West Division
19 15 6 44
14 16 9 37
16 21 4 36
15 20 6 36
14 21 6 36
8 26 9 25

104
96
99
100
100
85

90
115
131
119
119
127

Yesterday's Results
Seattle 142, Baltimore 116
San Diego at Chicago, Inc.
Cincinnati 14, San Francisco 121
Today's Games
San Diego vs. Chicago at Baltimore
New York at Bltimore
St. Louis at Boston
San Francisco at Detroit
Philadelphia at Los An jeles

Yesterday's Game
All-Star game at Toronto
Today's Games
Detroit at Montreal
New York at Chicago
ittsburgh at Oakland
Minnesota at St. Louis
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS

------------- -- 7-'--- - - --- -- -1- -l-l- -I

UN ION-LEAG
UNION-LEAGU E
UNION--.EAGUE

Engineers, Scientists, Mathematicians, Business Majors:
You can do more than you think you can.
See your,
'Westing house
recruiter
JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 1, 1968
At Westinghouse, there are unlimited possibilities to contribute to modern
civilization.In ocean sciences, defense and space, atomic energy, transporta-
tion, computer sciences, water desalting, international projects, power sys-
tems, microelectronics ... and much more.
Only a few companies in the whole world are involved in all the physical
sciences. Westinghouse is one of them. Don't sell yourself short. Get the
whole picture.

E

a

HEAR HOWE TODAY!!
ANARCHY and AUTHORITY
in AMERICAN LITERATURE"
Sponsored by
The English Department
AUDITORIUM A
S 4:10P.M.

WEEKEND

22-24
MARCH

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