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August 07, 1926 - Image 2

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1926

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U h? uutm1Vt
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday 1
during the University Summer Session by'
the Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michozan,
postotice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $r.so; by mail,]
$2.00.
Offices: Press Building, Mlaynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.1
Commuications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
aily at the discretion of the Editor. Jn-
signed communications will receive rno con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer, The
bummer Daily does not necessarily e..dorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492
MANAGING EDITOR
MANNING HOUSEWORTH
Chairman,
Editorial Board.....Eugene H. Gutekunst
City Editor..............William R. Breyer
1Vusic and Drama.........William C. Lucas
oman's Editor.........,Julia Ruth Brown
Night Editors
William Stockwell Theodore Hornberger
Paul J. Kern Frederick Shillito
Douglas Doubleday

I

session program of lectures, recitals,
trips, plays, etc., will assuredly back
up praise given in this direction.
Ann Arbor at its best is not the
most lively of towns and especially
during the Summer session is it {rath-
er phlegmatic. With but one excep-
tion the nucleus of recreational activ-
Ities around the town centers on the
two sumptious picture houses on the
campus. The intellectually stimulat-
ing pictures found therein constitutes
with this one exception-the emo-
tional and thoughtful phase of univer-
sity recreation.
The one exception is this weekly
program organized by the Summer
session office under Dean Kraus. Sev-1
en weeks of copious and varied enter-
tainments has been given to interest-,
ed students and townsmen through
the work of this office. True, all the
speeches did not attract every type
of student. An engineer, for in-
stance, would not be interested in
"The Creative Spirit and the Americ-
an public," the physicist might not be
interested in "Private Life in Graeco-
Roman Egypt." The chances are that
the literary student would find a dis-
cussion of "Bird Life in the Canal
Zone," rather sterile. However, thisl
very heterogeneity of subjects wes
one of the most valuable attributes of
the series; there was something of in-
terest to everyone on the campus nol
(natter what might be his particularl
hobby.
As a corollary to the regular lec-
tures the series of health talks ar-
'ranged by the Students' Public Health
department was especially valuable.
A word should be said in regard to
the trips arranged under University
supervision. The places visited were'
chosen because of general interest and
value to the members. From the Jack-
son prison excursion to the Put-in-
Bay trip they were well patronized
and entire satisfaction was express-I
ed by all who attended.
It is through such features of Un-
iversity life as these lectures, recit-
als and plays that the more lasting
values of a higher education are ab-
sorbed. The Summer session clos-
ing has been a profitable one from
this standpoint at least and not a lit-I
tle of the credit is due to this enter-
tainment series.
The shadow of the Union Jack
still lingers in the corner of the flag
where, now is the spangle of stars."
--Professor Phillips.
"Oratory is the art of making deep

f !fm /
TED . OL
GREATER
MOVIE
SEASON
We confess to a grave doubt as to
the value of the regular August cam-
paign on the part of Monsieur Hays
and his boys to put over a greater
movie season, with the accompanying
cut-puzzle contests and the blue and
red pennants.
Our doubt arises from the fact that
as far as we can see attendance at
the films has just about reached the
point of saturation. Movies are at
least as good as they were seven
years ago when we first started tak-
ing an interest in them, and the pub-
lic has awakened to that fact, with the
looked-for result to the box-office.
But the Paratnount (not an adver-
tisement) Question is: can it contin-
ue? or rather, will the pennants and
radio prizes stimulate any further at-
tendance at the cinema? Because
people by now are used to the movies.
They have become accustomed to set-
ting aside a certain portion of their
incomes to be handed over at stated
intervals to the pretty ticket-seller
at the New Pantheon Theatre, and ob-
viously, the gross earnings of the Am-
crican populace is not going to increase
automatically with the first day of
every August. So we wonder -
Still, it is a good idea. So much
more grandiose, more sweeping, than
the commonplace "Boost Memphis"
phrase. And it might be well applied
to other fields of endeavor. Say on
the first of December somebody might
institute a "Greater-Christmas-Trees-
for-the-Widows-and-Orphans Season,"
Or the rivals of Morris Gest could,
on the first of September, start a
Greater-and-Deadlier-Drama.s Season
with something like "Surpass 'The
Miracle'!" for a slogan.
We recommend the idea to Judge
Kenesaw Mountain Landis for his con-
sideration. He could begin on April
1, a few weeks before the baseball
season starts, a campaign for More
and Bigger Professional Baseball Lea-
gues. Then he could get a commis-
sion from the sporting-goods manu-
facturers........
T LTRAI, EFFECTS OF THE
THE ATRE

GRAHIAM'S
Special Tables of Books of
Interest' to Educators
GRAHAMS
At Both Ends of the Diagonal

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The most
refreshing
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page

J'
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,_.,...
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I0ce k-coeam4 0 ax .-

Dona Boyle
William Finlay
Frances Gusten
Lawrence Hyman

Assistants
Nita Kelley
Mary MacDonald
george T. McKean
Margaret Ward

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Circulation-.................Kenneth Haven
Advertising ................Francis Norquist
Assistants
Mabel Chambers Laurence VanTuyl
William F. Cook Mildred Williams
Edward Solomon
SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1926
Night Editor-PAUL J. KERN
"My skepticism about schools
extends to universities, and par-
ticularly to what one might call
the universities for juveniles like
Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, and
Yale, the annual cricket, boat
race, baseball, and football univer-
sities, where every sort of intellec-
tual activity is subordinated to a
main business of attracting,
boarding, and amusing our adol-
escents."-H. G. Wells.
THE SOUTH NIGHT BREAK
If the Democratic convention should
abolish the two-thirds rule, Al Smith,
governor of New York state and idol
of the great unwashed, would be nom-
inated on the first ballot only to crash
to the ground at the polls because of
his religion, in the opinion of Senator
Caraway of Arknasas. Mr. Caraway's
idea is that we must maintain the sol-
id South and the veto power it has
exercised over nominations for many
decades, and that any move to elim-
inate this condition will be opposed by
the South.
Mr. Caraway does not make it clear
whether he thinks the South will de-
feat Governor Smith for religious rea-
son or whether he thinks Northern
Democrats will turn on him for the
same reason. One can easily under-
stand why the wet-drinking dry South
should oppose the liberal ideas of
Governor Smith, but it seems strange
that the line should not be drawn
there.
It would be better if the Solid South
would break away from some Demo-
cratic candidate, not for party reason,
not because of religion, not because
of the Volstead travesty, but because
any section so narrow that it places
its votes solidly on party labels is
a thing foreign to good republican
government, for it does not develop a
t true party pposition andl too fre-
quently sacrifices the best interests
of the country and of its own section
for traditional superstition or idiotic
belief that any one party will 'ruin it.
Al Smith, we need you for a martyr
to the holy cause of good democracy.
A MATTER OF PRAISE
Criticism is of two general colors,
praise and censure. Editorial columns
when written in a sincere and inter-'
esting fashion more often employ the
second of the colors than the first.
For there is a kind of unholy glee in
soundly "panning" some odious indi-
vidual or project. It is human na-
ture. The vituperative phrase is ever
more trenchant, more of a gleaming
sword in the hands of its users than
is the paragraph of commendation.
Whereas blame is actuated by speci-
fic, clean-cut instance, praise is often
perfunctory, emanating too often
from a sense of duty or tradition.
A matter on this campus during the
current Summer session, however, de-
mands a sincere type of commenda-
tion. The hundreds, the thousands,

Ll

F RE EM AN'S
Dining Room
809 East Washington Street
{One Block from Hill Auditorium)

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-a rich ripened blend of
real Jamaica Ginger and
pure fruit juices - is a

superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees-3 copying.
A ra ead -y
penil c ilit. t wn
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beverage that mixes well
under all conditions.
"When good fellows get
together" enjoy one of -
these delightful combi-
nations -
Ginger Tea Shandy Gaff
Ice Tea and A-B Budweiser and
Ginger Ala. heMl Ginger Ale. hair
Ancn half. and half.
Horse's Neck
made by adding
lemon rind and
crack.ed ice to
A"B Ginger Ale.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
ST. LOUIS

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As doted in two sweet young things:
sounds from the chest seem like im- "Isn't the leading man just too ad-
portant messages from the brain."- orable?" "Oh, I could love that man!"
H. I. Phillips. "Doesn't he act his part just won-
derful ?" "Did you notice his eye-
Many a condemning (ad would be brows, Emma?
ashamed to tell what he did at col- As noted in the spinsters, three
lge-and without a car."--L.U. Dav-rows back: "So disgusting!" "That
is.
___painted leading woman is absolutely!
_ shameless." "Mrs. Macgruder, DID
I she have any stockings on? I don't
EDITORIAL COMMENT think she did!"
_ . I __ As noted in two tired business men
NITIMtIBATISMin the smoking room: "Say, Joe. I'll
(The New Fork tim~e.,) lbet this show is grossing anyways
two grand a week eh?" "Well, the
aver ranker and deadlier grows the balcony's almost full, and seats on
poison in what was always "pizen." the ground are four bucks a throw.
The prohibition authorities have been I I'll say it is!" "And they say the
telling us this for years. If some Gov- public don't like real art! "Ha ha
ha."
erment chemists have reported that I-a.
As noted in the inconspicuous man
such stuff as comes into their hands in the last gallery row: "Damn fools
is not greatly different from the an- still pay to see rotten hams put on
cient Demon, their analysis must have such trash. I guess I'll have to give
been vitiated unconsciously by imper- up writing decent plays and spend

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fect sympathy with "the cause." So! fifteen minutes on one of these honky-
ruthlessly successful is enforcement i tonk bonanzas."
that distillers for the bootleg trade are A. L Rose.
forced to turn to the most sinister in- * * *
gredients. The Chief Chemist of the The summer is over-there will be
Bureau of Internal Revenue gives us F no more Toasted Rolls columns In
some of their mixtures. Thessalian the 1926 Summer Michigan Daily-and
witches would faint at the naming of still we have failed to keep our prom-
such compositions. Our own favorite ise to our public. We said we would
horror is benzol, creosote and primary run some Gross Exaggerations and we
TNT; but there are others nearly aks have not done so.
potent;-a combination of alcohol, gaso- Tamanm agred to write one for us,
line and kerosene must be rich in to be sure, but shortly afterward Tam-
motive power. am vanished from human ken and the
In 20 per cent of the New York next time we saw him he was all

THECLTHFROCK
r3
JUST as Fall returns each
year, brisk and golden, so
too, returns its annual accom-
paninient---the cloth street
frock. Ultra chic, it is the
sort one wears now on cool,
coatless days, and just as
smartly all through the win-
ter. Of covert rep, in all of
-- the Fall shades. Of char-
meen, trimmed with a bright
splash of color. Proud posses-
sors of such new lines as the
bloused back, the higher flare,
the box-pleated trim and the
new high collars. Priced
$25.00 uP
(Second Floor)

q

speak-easies, whose number is esti-
mated at 15,000 by no less an author-
ity than Prohibition Administrator
Mills, the liquor vended is tinctured'
with wood alcohol, ind sometimes
with nitrotoluol, so that he who puts
an enemy in his mouth may almost be
said to put a torpedo therein. But
most of us are unfortunate enough to
know persons who, unabashed and ap-
parently undamaged, continue to treat
themselves to the forbidden fruit. It is
getting worse and worse, but they
don't know it. They are poisoning
themselves every day, and yet to the!
outward eye they look indecently heal-
thy. Do any of our regrettable friends
suffer from poisoning? They do not.
'Why? Because, as several learned
physicians who scorn the use of liq-
uor prescribtion blanks tell us, one of
the products of prohibition has been
the multitudinous extension of "Mith-
ridatism." The victim has made him-

enthusiasm about a short story he was
writing. That didn't help the Rolls
column very much.
* * *
And now a few words of well-meant
counsel. We assume that readers of
this column are lovers of humor.
(Correct us if we're wrong,) Being
lovers of humor, they will want to
pursue their study of it further. To
them we offer the following sugges-
tions:
1. Read six days a week Timothy
Hay's column in The Michigan Daily
which will resume publication Sept.
28, 1926.
2. Read the monumental works of
the nation's greatest humorists of the
da, i.e., Robert Benchley, Frank Sul-
livan, and F. P. A.
To those who are not our readers
w ecan merely say that we rate them
below George Ade's Ernest who was
kicked in the head by a mule when
young and believed everything he
read in the papers.
YIFNIF,.

"j

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of students and townspeople who at- self immune to poison by taking a
'tended one or more of the free en- slightly larger dose every time he
tertainments proffered by the Summer -crooks his elbow.

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