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ESTABLISHED
1922

P

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4EI&IIIII

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AINNIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XVII. No. 41 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN THURSDAY, AUGUST 5 1926 PRICE FIVE CENTS

HILONER PHESENT
HIS IMPRESSIONS
or GERMANY VISII
TALKS ON ECONOMICS, DRAMA
AND LIFE AT GERMAN
SCHCOOLS
DESCRIBES STUDENTS
Finds High-Grade Of Drama, and Love
Of Music, Popular Wit
People
"A-Trip-to-Germany: Impressions"
was Prof. J. A. C. Hildner's theme in
his address delivered in the Natural
Science auditorium yesterday after-
noon. Professor Hildner, who visited
Germany the early part of this year
talked about the general conditions of
economics, drama and university life
as they impressed him.
Professor Hildner said that the
German student can live on $45 per
month if necessary but the American
student will find expenses as high as
he finds them in Ann Arbor and then
he will not have the conveniences he
is accustomed to. Eighty-nine Ameri-
can students were at the German uni-
versities in 1925, out of a total en-
rollment of 3760 foreign students. He
also added that if the American stu-
dent has a sufficient knowledge of
German to understand the lectures he
may easily enter the German univer-
sities.
Professor Hildner was very much
attracted by the plays he attended
while in Germany. Shakespeare is
very popular there as well as modern
writers which included Bernard Shaw,
John Galsworthy and our owl Ameri-
can playwright Eugene O'Neiil. The
opera is still popular in Germany, he
explained, evidently they are still as

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Pennsylvania Still Holds Slush Fund Record

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STUDENTS IN JOURNALISM
ASKED TO (CONSULTr JONES
I Change in the arrangements
1for the trip of journalism classes
to Detroit to visit the plant of
the Detroit News developed un-
expectedly late yesterday after-
noon, and students plannijig to
make the trip are requested to
meet with Howard P. Jones of
the journalism department for a
few moments at 10 o'clock this
morning in the editorial room in
the old Medical building.
________________ I

HURl
IFN(u

L AND C'OWE
.DEFIANCE AT
IS COMMITTEE

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STATE ATTORNEY AND UILITIES
HEAD REFUSE TO ANSWER
REED'S QUESTION
CASES UNDECIDED
Aurora Newspaper Publisher Admits
Contributing $25,0 to Smith
Senatorial Campaign

a
The Senate Slush lit id invest igut ng ('nin imitt et, in -Sessio at Chicagois discovering that something like a
million dollars ehanled h ds during the semi rial lPrimnaries, l'enmsyVlv ia's fi gure of thr'e million seems
fairly safe as a record Above is seen a 1-neral view of the hearing in tihe Federal Building. At the left are
Charles V. Barrett and Robert E. Cmrwe, powerful Republican leaders whose war chest held at least $175,000 of
campaign funds, used in support of 'ra uk L. Smith, the sneeessful scnatorial candidate. At the right is Renry
1. Green, treasurer of the M(:Kinley campaign, whose estiimoy indiets that Senator McKinley spent $352,616
of his own money in his unsuccessful hattl
Tealis eave -
JAME*S TO 1LECTURE adi'eae DROP IN VALUE OF
Mon realor
European Tour FRAN DISCUSSED
'0 N M9Z0 9111, F9N c01S- - U

Chief Andrews
Once Indulged,'
Now Exemplarv
NEW YORK.-In a dispatch to thej
New York World from Paris Gen.
Lincoln C. Andrews, prohibition en-
forcement chief, is quoted as saying,
"Ah, before Prohibition I used to
drink wine-and' I'liked it." When
asked what wines he preferred now he
replied stoically,
"Oh, but now I drink nothing but
water," and added, "Remember my
duties at home-the repression of
bootlegging. Force of example, you
know.'
Observing that some French report-
ers appeared to mistake him for
Pussyfoot Johnson, General Andrews
continued, "No, no, it wasn't I who
took the initiative in Prohibition. In
the name of heaven, don't make a mis-
take. Johnsn is the man who did it.
I should not like to have any con-
fusion n the subject, I was mobilized
in France when the Prohibition Act
was passed. Secretary Mellon called
me to help enforce the application of
the law.. It is not for me to say
whether it is a good law or a bad one.
I simply see that it is not trans-I
gressed.
"I make war on bootleggers."
Asked if he had any opinion to ex-
press on the subject, General Andrews

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fox1d of good music as ever. Other Talks, Play and Art Exhibit
Professor Hildner also visited the .Rn On Eitertainiuentt
movies which, he says, are very popu-i
lar. He enjoyed many pictres with Program
German settings but he noticed that
the American movie magnates were TANSLEY TO SPEAK
sending numerous pictures with Am-1
erican stars. In Professor Hildner's Three lectures, a play and an art
words, "The Germans are fans, they exhibit remain on the Summer sessionI
just mob the movies. And the crowds
entertainment program. Prof. Tres-
are not as gtod natured as the Ameri-
can crowd. I noticed this attitude on I ton E. James of the geography te-
the part of the crowds in the subway partment will give an illustrated talk
as well. One day I was in line not } at 5 o'clock today in Natural Sciceln
very far removed from the box office auditorium on "The Amazon Valley."
and there was no chance for those A 'lc oorwi arua
At 5 o'clock tonmorrow in Natural
at the rear of the line to purchase tic-
kets. I accomodated one lady who Science auditorium Lionel ('ut-ker 0f
became so affectionate in her grati- the public speaking department will
tude that I became embarrased." speak on "Here and There in Japan."
At Moorberg, where Professor Hild- This lecture will also be illustrated.
ner visited a graduate of the Univer- At 8:30 o'clock tomorrow in Univer-
sity of Michigan, he saw the happy sity Hall auditorium the classes in
side of life and described this man's play production under the direction of'
home as one in which "milk and honey prof. R. C. Hunter of Ohio Wesleyan
flow." Professor Hildner is also of university will present George Kelly's
the opinion that Hamburg rates after satiric comedy, "The Show-Off." Ad
New York and London as a commer- mission will be charged; and tickets
cial center. priced at 50 and 75 cents may be se-
But there is another side of Ger- , cured at Wahr's and Slater's book-
man life which he met in Berlin. He stores.
lived there with Mr. and Mrs. Hugo On Monday and Tuesday of next"
Lappe in a home which he terms a week a collectin of paintings by Jean
museum. He said, "This family gives Paul Slusser of the freehand drawing,
you an insight into the economic con- department will be placed on exhibit
ditions as they prevail and will pre- in the west gallery of Alumni Memn-
vail for a good many years. Herr orial hall. In addition to these, speci- I
Lappe was a director of a metallwaar- mens of the work of the class in out-
enfabrik, but as far as I know did not door sketching will be displayed. The
contribute a pfennig to the support public is invited t oinspect this exhibit.,
of the family budget. He was hoping which wil be open from 9 to 12 and
that his company might successfully from 1 to 5 o'clock on Monday and
compete with concerns outside of Tuesday
Germany which were outbidding his At 5 'clock Monday in Natural Sci-
concern. So far he was unable to ad- ence auditorium Mr. A. G. Tauslev of
just himself to conditions as he found Cambridge, England, will deliver an
them. Perhaps this man like many illustrated lecture on "Vegetation in
others will continue to be a misfit the the Britsih Isles." This is the lecture
rest of his life. In the meantime his that was scheduled for last Monday,,
wife is compelled to rent out rooms of but which had to be postponed due to
her beautiful mansion at a ridiculous- the inability of Mr. Tansley to reach
ly low rate. Bankruptcies are very 'Ann Arbor before next week.
frequent, 20 to 30 a day. It looks as if
the richer corporations made rich dur-
Ing the war are swallowing up the O r eatherMan
small ones. And American capital is
in back of the larger ones. It would AL
be~ bad for Germany and the United
States too if German industry became ,
nothing more than an American con-
cession."
Professor Hildner is of the opinion
that the republic is firmly established
and is hopeful that industry and fin- s
ance will be on a firmer basis within
the next ten years, despite the heavy Forsees a cloudy sky today with prob-
taxes which are a great burden upon able showers, but no great change in
f-------U-. - *nne nla tmflW..dra- {

ro \ur v 'Tea hli of the depart-
ment of landsea<pe designiig and Mrs.
Ti-a ldi left yesterday for Montreal
Swlhere tomnorrow they will take th
steamer Ausonia for a tour of Europe,
in lading France and Italy.
In September Professor Tealdi will
etnd the meetings of the Internation
al City Plannimig coference at Vieim,
which will be followed by a tour,
umlr governm entat 1 guidanue, of the'
priincipal cities of Austri and Germ-
aiiy.
Professor and Mrs. Tealdi will re-
turn to Ann Arbor shortly after the
beginning of the first semnester this
fall.
Many Frenchmen
Entering States:
PARIS, Aug . 1A.P. With the
n x quotas available for immigrants
to the t' ited States on July 1, it was
revealed at the American passport
bureau1i 1a t manarly half of the 4,000
F rench quota for the year had been!
taken. Last year at this time only a
f'w ailicat ionis for visas Were on file,
Tlhe particular reason for the larger
number is said by officials to be the
lam-g' rmumbler' of servants being taken
houoe by American toui s who have
sIunt several nontbs livi-;gin France
in their ow apartment ;where they
had good French servants.
I1 L> )N.- -The la ~olet ter Charles
I )i i s er wrote has been sold at
8m( ion for pounds, a figure muh
below what Nas expected.

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Bamker Interprets Signiticancee O
Fall1Of Franc To America's
g'rituural Interests
WILL BUY LESS COTTON

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(By Associated Press?
CHICAGO, August 4.-Defiance was
flung at the Senate campaign funds
i committee today by Samuel Insull,
multi-millionaire public utilities exe-
cutive of Chicago, and Robert E
Crowe, state attorney for Cook county.
Both repeatedly refused to answer
a certain question concerning cam-
paign contributions in the recent Illi-
nois primaries. After making the rec-
ord, Senator Reed, Democrat of Miss-
ouri, chairman, told Insull that his
case would be reported to the Senate.
Crowe was told th'at the committee
!would take his case under advisement.
"I am unable to understand how a
public official would refuse to tell
where he got money for a political
campaign," the Missourian said "We
will let you know later what we will
do about it."
Ira C. Copley, newspaper publisher
of Aurora, Illinois, testified that he
had disposed of a public utility last
January and that he made his contri-
butions totaling $25,000 to the suc-
cessful Senatorial campaign of Frank
;L. Smith, chairman of the state com-
merce commission, after the commis-
sion had approved rate increases for
his companies last November 11.
Judge Edmund K. Jarecki of the
Cook county court told of the use of
gunmen during the primary and said
a recount of votes in the Republican
senatorial contest in two wards
showed such discrepancies as to in-
dicate prearranged fraud.
Frank L. Smith, filed with the com-
mittee a long statement denying he
had obligated himself to any person
on account of assistance given to him
during the campaign.
Chairman Reed and Mr. Insull had
a long good humored sparring match
The exchanges between the fiery Mis-
sourian and the state's attorney were
less jovial. Senator Reed plainly
showed his displeasure as Crowe
steadfastly refused to say whether In-
sull had given him any part of tie
money which he insisted had gone di-
reetly to the support of Smith. The
committee had information that Insull
had given an additional $10,000 to
Crowe himself, but neither the public
utilities magnate nor the Mtate attor-
ney would admit it, each refusing the
question. Before leaving the stand,
Insull made a speech against the
wort court and entangling alliances,
disclosing that he was a naturalized
citizen, having been born in England,
and contended that since he had
bought $650,000,000 worth of property
in Illinois, he ought to have some
voice in affairs.
Waterproof cigarette and match
boxes for swimmers have been per-
I fected.

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quoted "Cyrapo de Bergerac", saying:
IH Associate-d Press) "One may be a pastry cook without
NEW YORK, August 4.-- What the liking cakes."
fall of the French franc to a value of
i lit thlt more than 2 cents means to May Exert Trade
Anmerican wheat and (otton fields and I

to Amnerican factories, was told to the
Associated Press today by George E.j
Rtoberts, vice-president of the National
City Bank of New York.
lie described how many wealthy l
F'renchmen have contrived to have
plenty of money when they come to
he United States.
To the question of the effect of the
French fall ou American business he
declared:

Boycott To RaiseI
Church Pressurel
(By Associated Press)
MEXICO CITY, August 4.-The
movement among Roman Catholics to
exert the pressure of an economic
boycott against the attitude of the
Mexican government in enforcing the
new religious regulations is plainly

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"The incomes of the French people worrying business circles. Although
an. in francs. Six months ago the there have been no serious outward
franc was rated at 26 to a dollar but evidences of an economic boycott in
now it requires 10 francs to buy a dol- Mexico City, reports from elsewhere
lar's worth of anything. Wages have in the republic state that the volume
lek rising, that is, Frenchmen have of business has been tangibly reduced.

lben getting more francs for their
day's work, but the wage rise has not
kept up with the speed of the fall in
dlollar purchasing power of the franc.
French prices, too, have gone up, but
mot as fast as the franc has fallen.
"France is the fourth largest pur-
chaser of American cotton. The
Frenchu imported 915,550 bales from
this country in 1925. Cotton goods
lrices are rising faster than wages
and faster than purely French prod-

Meanwhile both the government
with its supporters in its present stand
on the religious laws and the Roman
Catholic episcopate as well as Cath-
olic leaders are both standing firm in
their respective positions.
Uncertainty has caused' a flood of
rumors which usually prove unfound-
ed.
Oflicials of the banks, both foreignE
and Mexican, state that thus far their
business has not been affected.

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BASEBALL SCORES

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EXAMINATL4IN SCHEDULES
(Commencing one xx'eek f'omn
August I)

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Seven o'clock classes mmet
Wednesday at 2
Eight o'clock classes meet.
Wednesday at 4
Nime o'clock classes meet
Thursday at 8
Ten oclock classes meet
Thursday at 4
Eleven o'clock class's meet.
Friday at 8
One o'clock classes meet
Friday at 10
Two o'clock classes meet
Thursday at 10
Three o'clock classes meet
Thursday at 2
Four o'clock classes meet
Friday at 2
Irregular classes meet
Friday at 4.

acts The distribution of cotton in
Framnce therefore is likely to lessen. Alumnus Bids For American League
Alumnus___Bids__ForDetroit 5, Washington 4 (10
Paris Amusements Antique Windmill' innings)
_s__seIsDetroit 7, Washington 11 (12
Patronage Great YARMOUTH, Mass., Aug. 4.-(A.P.) j innings)
--It's a broad step from automobiles C S.L 3, Phlelhi 1
PARIS, Aug. 4.-- (A.P.)---Every class to windmills, but Henry Ford, honor- Cleveland 4, New York 2
of amusements in Paris last year had ary University of Michigan alumnus, Chicago 7, Boston 3
a greater patronage than in 1924. has spanned the gap.
Those in the French capital paid ap- He has made a bid for a windmill ' LouationalLeague
proxiumately $12,000,000 to all sources, which was catching the Cape Cod St. Louis 8, Brooklyn 4
from whirh one million dollars was breezes when the embattled farmers of I Chicago 7, Philadelphia
realized on the tax for the poor. The Concord were making history. There Pittsburgh 0. Boston 14
state took over a million as its tax. are other would-be purchases and it Pittsburgm ,Boston 2
Theatres led the list, followed close- is not yet certain whether Mr. Ford
ly by the movies. Music halls ranked will be able to add the mill to h-is col-
Sthi-ir'ld ini popularity, and then circuses, lection of New England antiques.
dance halls and museums. Known as the Farris Mill, the pict PUBLICATION NOTICE
turesque structure was built on the
PARIS, -All future sales and pur- north side of the Cape in the 18th cen- Publicatin of The Summer'
chases of foreign exchange will be tury. When it was moved in 1782 to M wi ll bpend-
handled exclusively through the Bank Indian Town, later known as Friends' ed with the issue appearing Sn-
of France, which will control all ex- Village, in South Yarmouth, it was; day morning, August S. The
change operations, it is semi-officially hauled by forty yoke of oxen. Men Michigan Daily will resume pub-
learned. It is expected Premier Poin- 'came from miles around to help and lication September 28.
care will introduce a bill covering this, l'the occasion was made a festival. I

thue UokrwmL& people

temperature.

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