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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1900 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1900-05-09

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THE UNIVERSITY OI MICHIGAN DAILY

euolwhed Daily (Sundays excepted) during the
College year, at
THE UNVERSIIY OF MICHIGAN.
OrricS: The Inland Press, Henning Block.
Both Phones 17.
MANAGING EDITOR.
F. EGoEHAD, '01 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
O. H.HAs. '00 L.
EDITORS.
ATHLETICS, . . . D. HNUTT, '01 E.
r. R. WoooOW, '00 L. A. H. MCDoUGALL, '01
J. B. Woo, '00, W. H. HICREY,'00M,
L. J.oMoNTGoMER,'00, R H. JENEGAN, '00L.
W.A. KNIGHT' 01 L. V. T. EvANS '03.
Miss LILLIAN K. SAaNE '03.
The subscription price of the DAL1 is $2.50 for
thecollege year. wt are00010 dlivey efoe
0000 eac day. Noie, coooaniaios, ad
other matter intended for publication must be
handed in at the DAILY oflice before 0p. oa., or
mailed to the editor before 3 p. o. of the day
paevious to that on which they are expected to
appear.
Subscriptions may be left at the DAILY office,
Meyer's, or Stoiet's nowstand, or with Business
Manager. Subscriberswillconfer a favor by
reporting promptly at tt' office any failure of
carriers to deliver paper.
Allch ages o advertisin nater must bo in
the Olleey 4p.wm. ooto day peoiosttothal
on which the are to a0ear.
Today Chicago appears on a Michigan
field for an athletic contest for the first
time since the breach of athletic rela-
tions between the two institutions. Ther
difficulties between the two universities
were purely on matters of business policy
and management and could not break
down the strong friendliness existing
between the student communities. Chi-
cago and Michigan have always been the
keenest and strongest rivals m athletic
contests, but the rivalry was as trienIty
as it was sirited. Be the contest what
it may a meeting betweeen these two riv-
als always brngs out a large enthusiastic
crowd in support of the teams. It is to
be hoped tis will happen today. Ther
rooters should turn out and give the
Chicago team a generous welcome and
at the same tcle cheer on our own team
to victory.
President Hadle on Electives.
President Hadley of Yale addressed
the freshmen class a few days ago in
regard to the choice of electives for
isophomore year. His relarks were
of a nature to be of general interest.
He said that the sophomore electives
had been increased tn order to give
men a chance to determine the bent of
their minds in regard to their life-work
as early in the college course as possible.
Still a choice of line of work at the be-
ginning of sophomore year was not final
as it could easily be changed in junior
or senior years. This is one of the great-
est advantages of sophomore electives.
President Hadley divided the pursuits
of life which the Student was likely to
follow into three large divisions: Sci-
entific, the study of objects; Aesthetic,
the study of books; and Ethical1 the
study ofyaffairs. 'hese trete he subdi-
vided into three dtnerent life-works each
of a total of nine, as follows : First,
medicine; second, productive industry;
third, engineering and architecture;
fourth, teaching; fifth, minisry; sixth,
literature; seventh, journalism; eighth.
mercantile interests; ninth, law.
He then recommended that the fol-
lowing subjects be selected for each of
the nine: For the first, second, and
third, both French and German; for
first and second, chemistry, specially
for second and third, physics; for third,
both courses io mathematics which will
virtually save a whole year's work in this
subject; for fourth and fifth, easier
studies; for fifth, German, Greek, and
history; for sixth, French, Latin, and
Greek; for seventh, Gernan and His-
tory; for eighth, a diversified course;
for ninth, Latin and Greek.
President Hadey explained the subject
of English could not be treated as the
others. He advised every man whose
real interest in the subject is so great
that he can make it more than a class
room course, to take Ennglish; other-
wise it would do more arns than good.
In closing, he said that electives had
always been treated in a way at Yale
that were extremely gratifying, and that
he believed the new system of electives
for sophomores would prove a complete
success.-Yale News.

Saginat Students at the Unioersity.
During the last ten years over one
hundred and fifty students from Saginaw
have entered the University. The num-
ber graduated during the same years is
73. The smallest number of Saginaw stu-
dents registered at one time was in the
college year t889-o, when but 30 stu-
dents were enrolled; and the largest
number was in the year 1896-97, 61 reg-
isterine that year.
The following table shows the number
enrolled inthe severaltdepartments for
the different years. Students in the+
summer session are not included. +
- a
1889-90.... 19121313312oI10 30
1890-9,.... 21 314 4 01 0 1133
1891-92.... 28 8 3 6 o0o01 46
1892-93.... 28 13 3 7 I 0 1153
1893-94... 24 14 2 6 I 0 2149
1894-95-... 30 13 3 I 0 1 49
1895-96.... 32,11 3 6 a o 4156
1896-97.... 34 7 5811 0 I 461
1897-98.... 35 8 2 120o0 5,62
1898-99.... 2119131101110 4150
Summer Session in the Law Depart-
ment.
The summer sesson of the department
of law of the University begins June 25
and continues f I.:eight weeks. The fac-
ulty for the session is as follows: Pro-
fessor Bradley M. Thompson, Jerome C.
Knowlton, Thomas A. Bogle, Victor H.
Lane, Horace L. Wilgus, Elias F. John-
son, James H. Brewster and Instructors
John W. Dwyer, Albert J. Farrah and
John R. Rood.
The fis wing are in the subjects ie
which instruction will be given:
Elieneatary law-Blackstone, books I
and 111. Instructor Rood.
Elementary real property - Black-
stone's Commentaries, book II. Profes-
sor Brewster.
Contracts-Anson on Contracts. Pro-
fessor Knowlton.
Criminal law-Lectures and text-book.
Instructor Dwyer.
Torts-Cooley's Elements of Torts.
Professor Wilgus.
Domestic relations-Lectures. Profes-
sor Lane.
Coenvon Law pleading - Stephen's
Common Law Pleading. Professor
Bogle.
Agency-Lectures. Instructor Dwyer.
Partnership - Medhno's Elements.
instructor Rood.
Comon carriers and bailments-Lec-
tures. Instructor Dwyer.
Bills and notes-Johnson's Elements.
Professor Bogle.
Real property, fixtures, landlord and
tenant, etc.-Lectures. Professor Thomp-
son.
Equity jurisprudence-Lectures. In-
structor Farrah.
Equity pleading-Thompson's Equity
Pleading. Instructor Dwyer.
Evidence - Greenleaf on Evidence.
Instructor Rood.
Corporations - Lectures. Professor
Wilgus.
Monte Cristo Cigars, 10c
+ La Preferencia, -10
King Albert - 0c
General Mercer" - - 10c
+ Chancellor " - - 10
( Green Seal " - - 10
Royal Banner " - - 10c
Powell, Smith &Co.'sPerfectos10c
Sol Smith Russell Cigars - 10e
Sanchez & Haya - 100 +
8 STAEBLER & CO.
+ 301 S. Main St., cor. Liberty.
MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES
summer Practice Courses in Survey-
ig ShopPactice, OreDessinagMne Sor"
Iveyce ond Miig ad Field Oelogy.
Booklet of half tones illustrating the work,
radr SMay st. For booklet and catalogue,
F. W. MNAIR, Pres't, Houghton, Mich.

S
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SPECIAL.
Bicycle Shoes, Solid Colors and Combinations,
$1.25 to $2.48. Best wearing Shoes made.
GLASS'S SHOE STORE, 109 Main St. (
First-Class Repair Work. Open Evenings.

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ECOTHINGao

Those new Spring Suits
at the
New Clothing Store,
are going fast. Had you not better select
yours while the assortment is large.
We have the nicest assortment of
New Spring Clothing in all wove
Worsteds, Cheviots, Oxford
Greys, Vicimas, etc., that have
ever been shown in the city. We
shall be glad to show them to
you whether you buy or not.
Our Prices range $5 to $20
STAEBLER & WU ERTH,9
CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
211 S. Main St.

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Chrs Opt icct hosa

- 0 . t. rr , 50, a
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(AS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING SUPPLIES, SHADES,
PORTABLE LAMPS, ETC.,
A SPECIALTY. SANITARY PLUMBING, STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING.
J. F. SCHUH, 207 E. WASH NGTON ST.
'Chose New_--.,,
You see out every day come from
Phone HOL6MES'LIVERY
10ne56. 515 E. Liberty Street

- ' 9TeLts oo, u W A H R 'S S PE CIA L $3 .00 S H OE Th aetClr uoobile Red.
SEE SHOW WINDOW
JOHN WAHR T HE SHOE MA
218 SOU TH MA IN

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SEE OUR LINE OF 50 CENT PEARL HANDLE KNIVES AT MUMMERY'S DRUG STORE.

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