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November 18, 1899 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1899-11-18

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Published Daily (Sundays excepted) daring the
College year, at
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
Orrica: The Inland Press, Henning Block,
Both Phones. ta1.
..MANAGING EDITOR.
F. ENaELHARn , '01 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
O. .IsANs,'00 L.
EDITORS.
ATIILLTICS, . . . G. D. HDNUTT, '01 E
T. R. Waoonow, '00 L. A. It. McDUGALL,'01 E
A. G. BowN, 'S. E. J. B. Woo, 't,
. J.MaOsnnOMnl,'00, W. D IacnEy,'00M,
The subscription price of the tAes is 52.50 for
the catege ypan, ith a regain deiery eor
nnact day. Notice, comuenications, and
other matter intended for publication must be
handed in at the DAILY oice before 8 p. n., or
mailed to the editor before 3 p. M. of the day
previous to that on which theyare expectedto
appear.
Subscriptions may b hleft at the DAILY office,
Meyer's, or Steieta newstand, or with Busines
Manager. Subscribers will confer a favor by
reporting promptly at this oice any failure ofa
carriers to deliver paper.
All changes in advertising matter must be inn
the offic by 4 p. m on the day previous to that
on which they are to accear.
In charge of this issue,
--A. H. McDOUGALL.-
The Board of Regents in making
Manager Baird a faculty member in
full charge of outdoor athletics has
taken the most important and far-
reaching step in the progress of Michi-
gan's athletic policy. After chasing
the will-o'-the wisp of undergraduate
management for yeads the Athletic
Association several years ago began to
recognize its nature and to look about
for a more consistent and efficient
plan. To be sure, the last year or two
of the old system began to see a faint
outline of a consistent policy through
the predominating influence of certain
faculty members and resident gradu-
ates. But it was elusive and unsatis-
factory at best. It was conceded on all
sides that there must be some expe-
rienced head of matters athletic, who
continued in office from year to year to
direct all branches of sport.
Thus it came about that a graduate
manager was named to manage all
outdoor teams. Before his appointment
each branch of sport had its separate
manager. Each was conducted wita-
reference to the rest and often one was
at positive enmity to the other. The
result of a single, year of graduate
management did so much in the direc-
tion of uniformity as to surprise even
its warmest advocates. But the change
was not much more than a lessening of
the degree of the evil. Various adverse
interests still made themselves felt at
times, and the graduate manager was
at the mercy of a board of constantly
changing complexion. If he had a plan
which would make each branch work
harmoniusly for the benefit of the other
he could not put it in effect unless it
was sanctioned by the board. Far is it
from the trush to say that the board
was dominated by selfish interests or
ruled by inefficiency, for at times it
displayed remarkable disinterestedness
and foresight. But there would be no
guarantee of any stability.
Guided by the advantages already
secured, strong influences set to work
to secure the next advance by putting
the control in the hands of the faculty.
Equally strong opposition apppeared to
champion the cause of the undergrad-
ate. It was urged that the life would
b taken out of athletics, and that the
director of athletics would become in a
sense a tyrant And these objections
found many supporters. When the
-itr~~ 1-n z nrait +wa+the

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

tinually taking a lower place in a-
leties than her position otherwise en-
titled her to and wanted to see a vigor-
ous, efficient policy introduced.
The resignation of Manager Baird
forced immediate attention to the needs
of the situation. As aresult the Athltic
Board pledged itself to the securing of
faculty recognition. The board of con-
trol outlined a plan which has in the
maian been followed.
Now that the faculty members will
have immediate control of all athletics
it is generally conceded that Michigan's
prospects for a higher place in athletics
is assured. Many objectors still remain
however, who claim that with student
influence in the management reduced
to such an extent as to leav it prac-
sesinax moeelas bsetdp ospms to birke
ticaly nothing, interest in athletics wilt
decline. This no doubt has a lage
truth at bottom, but only in so far as
the management becomes dictatorial
and regardless of popular feeling. As
in all other matters if this control is
exercised in a wise and judicious nar-
ner, guided by the wishes of the under-
graduate body so far as such a coueve
ie consistent with efficiency and unity
of purpose, it cannot fail to arouse a
greater confidence and interest in
athletics.
Nov. 29, at 5 p. m., in the Physical
Laboratory, Mr. E. C. Woodruff will
address the Physical Colloquium on
"Methods of Rating a Free Pendulum."
The November meeting of the A. A.
Med.. Club was held on Wednesday
evening of this week. Dr. Vaughan
read the formal paper of the evening,
the subject which was "Bacteriology
for the General Practitioner." Atet
this a general discussion of the paper
followed. The cl ob is growing rapidly
in numbers and the members are dis-
playing a very active interest in the
meetings, which are held monthly.
The following persons from the Uni-
versity svere among the guests at the
Detroit Alumni banquet: Board of Re-
gents, President and Mrs. Angell, Dean
and Mrs. Hutchins, Prof. and Mrs. Pat-
terson, Profs. Thompson, Johnson,
Hudson, Hemp and Baird. The Glee
Club was also present.
There has been added to the equip-
ment of the physical laboratory a ena
chine for grinding lenses. This will be'
operated by the small motor which
runs the lathe in the instrument mak-
r's room.
University of Michigan students will
be given a chance to eat their Thanks-
givingdinner at their homes if they
sishs to pay one and one-third fat-s
over the Michigan Central road for the
round trip. The Central Passenger as-
sociation did not approve of the Michi-
gan Central's action in giving the col-
lege bys this rate, but that road wiii
make the rate just the same.rEvery-
thing that the Michigan Central rod
does is open to the approval of the
Central Passenger association so far
as cutting rates is concerned, and is
this matter the Michigan Central road
has manifested its intention to stand
by the college boys whether the Central
Passenger association approves of its
action or not. Heretofore a rate of one
and a third fare for the round trip has
been made for Ann Arbor students for
the Thanksgiving, Christmas and East-
er. vacations by the Michigan Centeal
road, -and the same rate will be made
this year.
' CIGiARETTES 1
i We haves atryu want
C'T teen 70 dteset kna

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STEIN BLOCH CLOTHING
is without question the finest pro-
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garments, at abut one-half the price. It is that kind of clothig.
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have this season purchased an unusual Large Stock of Stein Bloch Suits
and Overcoats and are in position to fit all shapes and forms from
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Best Line of Furnishings and Caps.
Always come to us for the proper thing.
Lindenschmitt & Apfel
Parker's Campus.
Furnishes first-class board with French Cook.
REGULAR BOARD $2.75. MEAL TICKETS $3.00. Short
orders promptly filled. Fresh Home Made Candy now on hand
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and salted peanuts now ready. Come in and try them.
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THE SHOEME
THIS SPACE IS RESERVED FOR
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Before buying your note books or lecture covers call in and see our new patent cover. The
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Parker and Waterman Per)s from $1.25 up. Wholesale ard Retail
Paper from 10 cents a Pound up.
F. J. SCHLEEDE, 340 South State Street,
I~p

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