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September 30, 1891 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1891-09-30

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IV.Of

A T. Wlai jj.

VOL. II.-No. I.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1891.

PRICE, THREE CENTS.

UNIVERISTY CHANGES.
What Has Been Done and What Has
Not Been Done.
The first things that the old stu-
dent looks for upon returning to
Ann Arbor, are the improvements.
When he has inspected his own de-
partment, he turns his attention to
the campus to see what progress has
been made in the building of the
Waterman gymnasium.
He finds that not even the ground
has been broken for the foundation,
and is, of course, disappointed. He
then immediately repairs to Shee-
han's, Stoffilets, the P. 0. News
Stand, or the DAILY office, and buys
a copy of the U. OF M. DAILY (if he
has not already subscribed) in order
to learn why nothing has been done.
And this is what he will read:
THE GYMNASIUM.
The Waterman Gymnasium has
not been commenced because there
is not enough money to construct a
building according to the plans that
have been submitted to the authori-
ties by Architect Arnold, of Detroit.
The plans call for an expenditure of
$65,ooo, and there have been sub-
scribed about $42,000. How the
balance will be raised is yet an un-
solved problem. Architect Arnold
traveled through the east during
the summer and inspected the
best gyms at the larger colleges and
universities there. His plans con-
template a building larger than any
gymnasium in the east, the main
floor being 90x150 feet. There will
be an annex to each side of the main
building, one for the director's room,
the shower baths and dressing rooms,
and the other for the ''co-eds." If
the latter structure is not built at
present, a reduction of $so,ooo can
be made, leaving $13,000 to be
raised. The committee having the
matter in charge will meet about the
middle of October, to take action.
THE ATHLETIC FIELD.
Although considerable progress
has been made with the athletic
field, the athletes will be somewhat
disappointed because the grounds
are not ready for use this fall. Prof.
de Pont gives it as his opinion that
the field cannot be used until next
spring and possibly not then.
The only change that has been
made in the original plan is in the
grand stand. Instead of being part-
ly on the south curve, it is built

upon the zou yards straight, right at
the "finish." We will print in to-
morrow's issue a cut of the field and
and a complete description of it as
it appears now. The delay in the
completion of the field has been
mainly due to the failure of the
grading contractor to keep a suffi-
cient force at work.
LITERARY DEPARTMENT.
In the Literary Department a
number of important changes have
been made. Prof. Harrington has
accepted the position of Chief of the
Signal Service, at Washington.
Prof. B. A. Hinsdale has a year's
leave of absence which will be spent
in Europe. Prof. E. E. Brown will
fill the chair of Pedagogy during his
absence. The new tutors are as
follows: Mr. Weeks in French, Mr.
Hildner in German, Mr. Rebec in
English, Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Mead
in Philosophy, Mr. Lyman and Mr.
Hall in Mathematics, and Mr. Hig-
ley in Chemistry. No radical
changes have been made in the ap-
pearance of the buildings.
LAW DEPARTMENT.
In answer to the query, "What
changes htve been, or are to be
madein your department this year?,"
Prof. Knowlton, who was made per-
imanent Dean of the Law Depart-
ment at the June meeting of the
regents, said: "Well, sir; one
change is, that the lecture printing
business is going to be stopped; the
faculty have decided that we will
have no more of this nuisance."
The determination manifested in the
tones with which these words were
spoken was very satisfactory proof
that this policy will be strictly car-
ried out in the future, however the
violations of the rule may have been
winked at heretofore. "To be, or
not to be," that is the question that
has been agitating both students
and professors,especially the former,
but it seems now pretty definitely
settled that it is "not to be."
Quite a number of changes have
been made in the courses of instruc-
tion which can be given more fully
later. Three new men have been
added to the faculty, viz.: Judge
Champlin, of Grand Rapids,
Nathan Abbott, of Boston, and Ed-
win A. Connelly, of Detroit.
Judge Champlin will lecture to
the senior class on Public Corpo-
rations and Private Corporations,

and to the junior class on Torts.
Prof. Nathan Abbott will lecture to
the seniors on Wills and Admistra-
tion of Estates, etc., and and to the
juniors on Domestic Relations.
Prof. Knowlton will lecture to the
senior class on Criminal Law, and
to the juniors on Carriers and on
Contracts. Several changes in the
plan of text-book work will soon be
announced. The post-graduate
course of instruction has been
strengthened in many respects, and
will be a very profitable course.
One of the changes that has not
been made is the addition to the
law building. This will no doubt
be a disappointment to many, but
to none more than to the faculty
themselves. Plans for the ad-
dition were prepared and sev-
eral bids for the work were re-
ceived. After due deliberation one
of these bids was accepted. After
the acceptance of his proposal the
contractor then withdrew his bid
and left the faculty in a sea out of
which they haven't yet been able to
get. Theywill profit by experience,
however, and provide against the
re-occurrence of such a set-back. It
will now be impossible to erect the
building this year, but before the
members of the class of '93, who are
just now pouring in with such large
numbers, return next year,the build-
ing will be erected and ready to re-
ceive them.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL DEPARTMENTS.
Doctor Dock, who was formerly
connected with the University of
Texas, now occupies the chair of
Theory and Practice in the Univer-
sity.
Doctor Christopher, who was
Professor of Theory and Practice
last year, now occupies a chair in
the Polyclinic of Chicago.
Professor Vaughan has been
elected to the deanship of the Medi-
cal Department. He has been
abroad during the summer and has
lately returned to Ann Arbor.
Dr. Martin has not yet returned
from his European trip.
The apparatus intended for Dr.
Abel's new laboratory still lies in
the custom house at New York and
as a result it will be late in opening.
Doctor Ford, who lately resigned
the deanship of the Medical Depart-
ment, a position which he held so
(Continued on third page.)

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