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April 30, 1898 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE UNIVERSITYLOF MICHIGAN DAILY.

Published Daily (Sundays excepted) durin
the College year, at
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
OrICE: Times building, 329 S. Main St
Telephone (New Sate) 18.
MANAGING EDITOR,
J. F. THOMAS, 100 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER
0.1. HAs '50 L.
EDITORS
H. B. SKILLMAN,'8 L., Athletics.
E. L. GEIsusE,'93 L T. R. WooDuow, '98
F. ENoELHAnD, '0. F. D. EAMA, '00
G. D. HUDNUT, '00 . S. DANFORTH, '98
P. W. JONEs, 99. C. H. LUND, '00 M.
A. H. MDOGALL,'01 .
The subscription price of the Daily Is $2.5)
or the college year, with a regular delivery
before noon each day. Notices, communica-
Lions, and other matter intended for publica-
tion must be banded inat the Daily offiebe-
foe 3p. in., or mauled to tie editor before 3
p. in, of the day previous to that on which
they are expected to a ppear.
Subscriptions may be left at The Daily
Office Meyer's or toffiet's Newstand, or
with business Manager. Sucriers will con-
er a favor by reporting promptly at this
office anvfailure of carriersto deliver paper
MICHIGAN DEFEATS CHICAGO
(Continued from First Page.)
swer the points made and not attempt
to evade them. The negative, further,
must show how this treaty will secure
any more peace than we now enjoy.
This treaty is not peace but a proposed
means to peace. In answer to the argu-
ment that over one thousand of Amer-
ica's representative men upheld this
treaty, it must be known that they fa-
vored the abstract principle of arbitra-
tion, and probably had never read the
details of this treaty. This treaty can-
not secure an effectual administration
of international law, because there is
no effectual law to administer. Inter-
naitonal law today is in a most chaotic
state, and to this we should be bound
for five years. This treaty demands a
sanction where there is no sanction.
It prevents war only when war has
been shown to be necessary and desir-
able. It asks for involuntary arbitra-
tion, which is a contradiction of terms.
The proposed treaty was so general
that England could nave seized the
whole of South America and we could
have done nothing.
Edward M. Baker, of Pennsylvania,
was the next speaker for Chicago. He
devoted practically all of his time to
rebuttal. He claimed that the affirma-
tive had not answered the poirts made
by the negative. Single defects should
weigh nothing in the balance of right
with the great good to be derived from
the acceptance of the treaty. The sen-
ate can, if it wishes, sign away tempor-
arily its right of ratification if the need
is evident and they so desir. Our na-
tional hands would not have been fet-
tered because we are not afraid to arbi-
trate a dispute even if rights are in-
volved. The affirmative must point out
real dangers not imaginary ones. Any-
thing which will m4e war a more re-
mote possibility is desirable and should
have been accepted by the senate. This
treaty was a step in the right direction.
Mr. David F. Dillon spoke third for
Michigan. He held that the burden of
proof was upon the negative because
they were the advocates of a new sys-

tem and should show why it was desir-
able. These. conditions which inake °a
treaty of arbitration possible make war
g impossible. This treaty was imposed
upon us by the initiative of England.
The Monroe Doctrine was involved.
This is seen by the general provisions
of the treaty and by the admission of
Lord Salisbury and the English press.
He then reviewed the argument made
by the affirmative and summarised'
the position.
John F. Itagey closed the debate for
B Chicago, and also spent mcst of his
time in rebuttal. We should not let a
matter of national policy outweigh a
matter of right. This tre aty was a
necessary germ of arbitration which
should have been phinted. The system
proposed by this treaty is not new, but
it is merely an application of an old
principle. This treaty would have edu-
cated the people in the right direction.
Mr. Berkible closed the debate for
Michigan. in a strong rebuttal and ro-
view of the position of the afirnsative.
ISLAND LAKE EXCURSION,
The A. A. Eailroad will run a special
excursion to Island Lake Sunday, May
lst, at 0:15 a. m. The return train will
leave Island Lake at 0:30 p. m. Fare
for the round trip 75c. This will be the
last opportunity given to see our boys
before they leave for the south. Sun-
day is the only day visitors will be ad-
mitted to the camp.
J. J. KIRBY, A. G. P. A.
IF YOU WANT THE BEST
FRATERNITY STATIONERY,
BADGES OR PINS
Send to
SMITH, STURGEON & CO.,
237, 239, 241 Woodard Ave.. Detroit.
Designs and estimates furnished on all work
of this kind.
#Athens = Theatre$
-TUESDAY, MAY 3,
$ROLAND REED$
--IN---
'A Man
ofoIdeas."

ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES IN

Fine Footwear.

J. T. Jacobs
SEE OUR WINDOW.

1Son
121 South Main Street.

.FINE TAILORING.
Our line of Spring Woolens is now complete, embracing all the swell--
est and most exclusive novelties.
Our garments wherever seen will be appreciated and pronounced by
critics as strictly correct.
We respectfully invite your inquiry.
We do only a fine trade.
We carry but one patterr of a novelty in stock.
Garments bearing our label pressed gratis.
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New Phone 43.

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A. A. SOHANTZ,E. r' DOSROT. 0MI0H. D 111oi 10g1810111 10Y11111101 00111111111
INTERCOLLEGIATE BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COSTUME,
COTRELL & LEONARD.
472-478 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
Makers of the cArs and aowNs, to University of Michigan,
U. of Chicago, U. of Minnesota, Cornell, Lehigh, U. of Penn-
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Class contracts a specialty.
HOLMES' LIVERY,
Si5 East Liberty St.

Phone I06

BEST SERVICE IN THE CITY.

'98

MIHGAESIN

400

The University of Michigan Annual
PAGES. 200 ENGRAVI
BOUND IN OLIVE GREEN. STAMPED WITH GOLD.
FINEST ANNUAL EVER ISSUED IN THE WEST.
WILL BE ON SALE
NEXT TUSDAY.,

INGSr

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