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February 11, 1899 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1899-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

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Published Daily (Sundays excepted) during the
College year. al
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
'lerreo: The aland Press, Henning Block.
Both Phone 147
MANAGING EDITOR.
F. ENGELHARD, '01 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
o. H. HANs, '00L.
EDITORS.
Athletic Editor, T. R. WooDRow, '00 L.
P. W. JONEs, '99, A. II. McDoUGALL, '01 E.
F. D. EAMAN, '00: C. H. LoND, '00 M,
G. D. HUDNUTT, '01 E. J. B. Woo, '00.
The subscription rice or cih ec ic ills le
he colig year, with a reglr delivery efore
noon eah day. Notice, comunoiatios, and
other mattr intcaded for pbliationmst e
handed in at the DAILY oficebefore s p. m. or
smailed to the editor beore 3 pi. sOf.o the lay
previous to that on which ticey areexpeted to
appar
nebcriptions may be eft at the DALY office,
Meyer's, or Stollet's newstand, or with Business
Manage. Sohriers will coner a favor by
reporting promptly as this olice any failre of
carriers to deliverapper.
All change in advertiiss" mattes mut e in
the ofiee b p.m. onthe lay previousto that
on which they are to appear.
IN CHARGE o ToFsw'u IssUE,
G. L. HUDNUTT.
Prof. Scott Lectures to Pedagogical
Society.
A paper was read by Prof. F. N
Scott before the Pedagogical Society,
Monday, Feb. 6, on the Figurative
Element in Grammatical Termi-
nology.
It is the general testimony of high
school teachers that pupils entering
the high school have very little
knowlegde of grammar. There are
several reasons for this, viz poor
teaching, poor text books, wrong
traditions.
The terms used in text books have
great power over the child's mind,
owing to their figurative element.
These figures should clothe the terms
in such a manner, that when the
illusion has died away, their mean-
ing may stand forth clearly and
fully.
The mental images formed by
children in the study of grammar are
frequenty grotesque- and horrible,
and such as to give a strong dislike
to the subject. 'Parts of speech"
were conceived of as the organs of
speech. Or as the parts of language
which had been shattered by a vio-
lent explosion, and which were to be
put together again to form a sentence.
"The verb governs the noun"
aroused the picture of a king sitting
upon his throne, and holding a
scepter over a poor, weak, little
noun, which was much deserving of
sympathy. Or, the verb was con-
ceived of as the father, the noun as
the mother; the modifiers were the
children, some favorites of the father,
some of the mother. "An irregular
verb" was like a child, irregular in
its attendance upon school, some
times to be found in the sentence,
sometimes not. Or, it was misshapen,
or bad, like a naughty child. The
word "appendage" invariably called
up the idea of tail. "Objective"
meant objectionable; or contrary, ini
the sense of objecting to things; or
an object-something at a little dis-
tance. "Cases" were three boxes,
into which the nouns and pronouns
were dropped.
But the fault is not with the
terminology; it lies deeper. There
are two causes; (1) A misconception
of the purpose of grammar, (2) A
failure of the teacher to make the
pupils understand that grammar deals

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with real, living speech. The teacher
should make this imaging tendency
of mind of service, should stimulate
and direct proper trains of thought.
Grammar should be interesting and
vivid; should be connected with liv-
ing speech.
Prof. McLaughlin's Lecture Feb. 22.
At the request of the Daughters
of the American Revolution, and the
Vice-Regent for Michigan of the
Mt. Vernon Association, Prof. An-
drew C. McLaughlin haa consented
to give a lecture in Harris Hall, on
Feb. 22. The subject of the lecture
will be Spain and the United States
in America and the causes that led
to Spain's losing her colonies. It
will be of special interest at this
time and Prof. McLaughlin's pat-
riotic treatment of the subject will
make the lecture an appropriate cele-
bration of Washington's Birthday.
The proceeds will be devoted by the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion to patriotic work and by the
Vice-Regent of the Mt. Vernon
Association to the special work of
the restoration of the main hall at
Mt. Vernon.
Student's Burned Out.
About 7 o'clock last evening the
home of Mrs. Stafford. corner State
and Catharine streets, caught fire
from an overheated chimney. The
city fire department reached the
house before the fire had gained
much headway, but not wishing to
do any damage by chopping unneces-
sary holes in the building they
sprayed the outside of the roof until
the fire spread between the ceilings
and roof over the whole house. The
student roomers managed to save
most of their books, but their cloth-
ing and other property was lost.
Those who roomed in the house were
Paul Moses, Milton Hartman, Arthur
Lindau, Arthur Loeb and Milton
Livingston.
Lectures on Ancient Athenians.
The course of lectures on the
"Monuments and Life of the Ancient
Athenians" by Prof. M. L. D'Ooge
will be given Mondays at 2 p. m.
They may be taken by any who
choose, whether they are classical
students or not.
Go and get a skate on at the Ann
Arbor skating park. It is fine.
ATH 2X S
j TfIEATRE
The Mutual Life Ins. Co.,
Of New Yo k.
Assets $277.516325.36.
Guarantees larger Paid-up Insurance, Cash and
Loan Values and Extended Insurance than any
other company.
Agents Wanted.
Address, D. A. PIERSON. Dit ut.,
4851d ave. Detroit, Mch.
SALI BURY'S
' Drugs and Optical Goods
Cook House Block, Huron St.

1 TH~ES
Microscopical Supies INLAND PRESS
Dissecting Instruments. ANN ARBOR
Everything you need for Labora-
tory work you will find here. ites, Binders,
J.J.QUARRY, -AND-
C UBLANK-BOOK MAKERS
HENNING BLOCK
COLLEGE STUDENTS
THE
COUNTRY
OVER
SMOKE
Ssurnruo's Gowdn Scoptro
erices from $15 Up.
Best
-
World
OLLEGE men everywhere are invited to send for the Washburn Souvenir Catalog.
It contains nearly 3oo portraits orartists and collegians, besides giving some account
o the construction of Washburn instruments and a complete list of net prices.
First-class music dealers the worldover sell Washburns, or instruments may be
obtained from the makers
LYON & HEALY. CHICAGO.

This space belongs to the Students' Lecture Association.

1899 Crescents M. STAEBLER'S
$35.00
Crescent Bevel Gear Chain- Cycle Emporium,
less, - - - $60.00
Juveniles, - - - 25.00 119 WEST WASHINGTON ST.,
All fitted with Dunlap Detachable Tires. ANN ARBOR.
GRANGER'S SCHOOL OF DANCING.
$5.00 per Term of 12 Weeks.
PROGRAMME PARTY EACH SATURDAY EVENING.
Private Lessons by Appointment. Bell 'Phone 246.
A NEW THING
In Patent Leather Shoes for Spring, is the English
Flat Last. We have them in Button and Lace. If
you want to be successful, look successful and wear
our shoes.
! IlA9 119 L119nnOR , aln n gAr bo .

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