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March 25, 1895 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-03-25

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l e 1. of

, . a l .

VOL. V. NO. 125.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1895.

PRICE--THREE CENTS.

VO.Vto 2. NVRIYO ICIAMNAMAC 5 85 RIETRECNS

A MASTER OF THE VIOLIN. M. Ysaye is playing, a" yet his tech-
nical dexterity is marvelous, but it
-. EUGENE YSAYE AT UNIVER- is so absolutely subjugated and made
SITY HALL TONIGHT. the servant of his artistic conceptions
that only at times, whn one is as-
Program to Be Given-Favorable toished by some brilliant executed
Comments of Great Critics-M. passage, some wonderful bit of doubie
Aime Lachaume Is a Great Con- stop.ig or octave playing, se ulir-
tinental Pianist.
_______Panit.monies, fairy-like in delicacy and win-
Students of the University have an someness, does one realize that one
opportunity to hear a master of the is listening to a great virtuoso as well
violin tonight in Eugene Ysaye, who as to a great artist."
has given ample proof of being one of t. Yaye is assisted by M. Lah-
the greatest virtuosi that have ever aume, one of the most celebrated of
been heard in America. His untiual- continental pianists, and one who has
ilied successes in Boston, New York, already acquired i wide reputation
Cincinnati and other musical centers, in this country. It is seldom two suchs
are similar to those triumphs artists appear tog ther, and the mere
which everywhere followed the ap- announcement of their coing is sss-
pearainee of Paderewski, while s fticiest to crowd University hall.
classed by competent critics with such W. G. SALTER INJURED,
massturs of the violin is Paganhisi,
Wieniawski, Joacfiml, Wilhelmj and A '96 Lit Hurt in the Mechanical
Ole Bull. Laboratory Saturday.
The prograin will consist of six Wilburn G. Saltler, 't6 lit, fell from
,numbers, as follows: a ladder while carrying a piee of
1. Sonate, by Grieg, consisting of iron pipe and pipe tongs up to 1e
eight movements, MM. Ysaye and tank room of the mechanical labora-
slachaumre. tory Saturday afternoon. When about
2. Concerto of four iovemrn-ts n tory Ssst fteoor Wne oh
B minor, by Saint Sns. (Op. 61.tiwle feet from tiet(les of te
3 Selserzo,f by Chopin,, M. Lach- cleats of the ladder gave way, causing
aurne. Mr. Salter to fall. He was seriously
4. Parsifal-Paraphrase, by Wagner, injured and when picked up was un-
Wilhelmj, M. Ysaye. conscious. Help was imeditely se-
5. (a) Aur Soir, by Slsumann, (b)
Rhapsodie (11th), by Liszt, M. Lach- curt-iansile was removeuitot'
flume. hlspit5.
6. Zigeuner Weisen, by Sarate, M. Tue ihospital surgeon reported yes-
Ysaye. terday that Mr. Slater was improving
The critiques passed upon M. rapidly. His parents were notified of
Ysaye's playing by the best musical 1iss injury and they arrived from
-authorities of America are uniformly Chicago yesterday afternoon,
and invariably laudatory in a high Enterprise of an Alumnus,
degree. The New York Herald has
the following: The "Fourth Estate" of March 14,
"M. Ysaye's playing has every good had the following notice of H. W
quality that endears it to the listcner. Hawley, '84 lit:
He has a silvery, pure tone, that in An example of what entetrprise and
harmonics becomuss like a spark of capital will do to push a metropolitan
light in brilliancy ad transparency. daily to the front is the case of the
The surety and truly phenomenal Chicago Times in the hands of H. W.
agility of his left hand is equalled by Hawley. He took the property In
his command of the bow, the most charge and, with a motto of "news,
complicated rhythmical figures being first, last aud at all times," produced
-tossed off with an ease that is fas- a wonderful sixteen-page daily pape
cinating. His tone has also that rare every day in the week. He was wel
quality of never seeming small, even on the road to success, when the prop
in passages of exquisite delicacy, or osition for consolidation with the He,-
when the solo instrument enters after aid was offered on a very attractivt
the crash of the entire orchestra, as, basis, and he accepted it with th
for example, in the last movement of determination to do as well for the
the Saint-Saens concerto, where the new paper.
violin, repeating a phrase after the Mr. Hawley has made a success o1
full weight of string and wood and
brass, seemed to dominate the entire newspaper work In Min pols, Den
orchestral mass. The violin in his ver and Chicago since leaving th
hand seems a living, sentient being. University. He is now managing edi
His style is essentially masculine, and for of the Chicago Times-Herald.
is yet graceful to the verge of coque- Will Be Continued.
-try.
Mr. Reginald De Koven says: "M. The experiment of holding the Sun
Ysaye has breadth and finesse, dell- day services in Newberry hall has
cacy and power, and passionate In- been so successful that it is decided t
-tensity combined with an almost fem- make that, the permanent hour.
line tenderness and pathos. One T lt S.. C. A. will give a social foi
never tluaks of his technique while Michigan students in the near future

SCHOOLMASTERS TO MEET.
WILL BE IN SESSION NEXT FRI--

r
Y
f
-,
e
r
.

DAY AND SATURDAY.
Educators of the State to Discuss
Important Matters-Meetings Will
Be Held in Newberry Hall-Papers
on the Program.
The twenty-fourt siannual meeting
of tise Michigan Schoolmaster's chb
will be held in Newberry sall next
triday and Saturday, following the
(classical conferenee. ihe program
has been arranged as follows:
Friday at J o'clock there will be a
discussion of "The High School Course-
in Biological Science," with the fol-
lowing series of 10-msinute papers:
"The Aim," Prof. D. C. Worcester,
Ann Arbor, and hiss It. 31. Bailey,
Grand Rapids; "The Subject Matter,"
L. N. Johnson, Ann Arbor; "The
Length of the Course," Miss Florence-
1. Lyon, Detroit, and hiss Atargaret
Merrill, Saginaw; "Position in the-
Curriculum," F. E. Wood, Bay City;
"Equipment and Management,", Mitss
Grace Hastings, Detroit. "The Highs
School Course in Physics," Prof. G.
W. Patterson, Ann Arbor, treating
question from the point of view of
the university. Prof. E. A. Strong, of
Ypsilanti, will lead the discussion.
Friday afternoon '. F. Adams, of
Detroit, will read a paper on the
"Proper Relation of Laboratory Work
and the Txt-Book." Prof. J. O. Reed,
of Ann Arbor, will lead the ilscus-
sion. Prof. H. N. Chute, of Ann Ar-
bor, will follow with a paper on "Lab-
oratory Work; What? How? How
Much?" Harry M. Randall, of Bay
Chty, will lead in the discussion. At 4
o'clock "The High School Course in
Chemistry" will be treated by Pro.
Paul C. Freer, of Ann Arbor, and the
discussion on the paper will be led by
Prof. J. Montgomery, of Ann Arbor,
W. G. Cook, of Saginaw, and Prof.
A. B. Prescott.
On Saturday the morning session
will be devoted to a discussion of "The
High School Course in Mathematics."
Prof. D. E. Smith, of Ypsilanti, will
speak on the "Educational Values in
Mathematics," with a discussion by
Prof. F. N. Cole and A. G. Hall, of
Ann Arbor, and N. L. Fite, of Orcinard
Lake. "Modern Methods in Geom-
etry" will be treated by E. C. God-
dard, of Saginaw. His paper will be
discussed by Prof. Alexander Ziwet
and Prof. L. D. Wines, of Ann Arbor,
and H. H. Frost, of Bay City. At the
last session of the club on Saturday
afternoon C. B. Williams, of Kalama-
zoo, will read a paper on "Modern
Methods in Algebra," to be discussed
by J. L. Markley, of Ann Arbor, and
D. C. Van Buren, of Ypsilanti.

NO GOOD STUDENT
Tries to learn without books.
Some people though try to use
musical instruements with little
or so tone.
We Say Buy Those 1Which Hae lone
We sell that kind.
51 South Main st.
We
Employ
Young
Men
ts dstibue
or averie-
sets Inpat aearnt sorahigh grade Acmne
bicycle. shieS pasenmod then ansapprala. it
work done unth the bicycle arrives andproves
satisfactory.
Young Ladies *eaimae*,"h0
If bopo* ires apparhy u'rst be wellrecn-
ACME CYCLE COrIPANY,
ELKHART, IND.
FRESH LINE OF
LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES
JUST RECEIVED AT
Z TUTTLE'S,
48 S. STATE ST.
Go to RANDALL for
Artistic Photos.
NEW GALLERY.
LARGEST OPERATING BOOM IN STATE,
NO. 15 WASHINGTON BLOCK,
Ann Arbor, Mich.
ED. A. CADIBUX.
PRORIETOR OF THE
Latest Improved Barber Shop
In the city. E. Washington St., Ist door
east of Main st. Ann Arbor.
MAMMOTH A PIPE SALE
--
JOLLY & CO's
16 SouH STATE ST. Don't fail to com.
not and Cold Lunches at All Hours.
Heard's
Criminal
Pleading
NOW ON SALE AT
CDA.H R'S.
Up Tewn, Down Town,
UniversityBookstore, OppositeoourtlHouse
20 S. State St. 4 N. Main St.
ANN ARBOR

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