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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

October 01, 1895 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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:\oa. VI. No. 2. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1895.

FoUL PAGEs-3 CENTS.

i ..

WE OW"E MUCH
of our success to the stu-
dents of the U. of M. With-
out their confidence and
patronage we couldnot
nave built up the biggest
music business in the
county. In a city where
customers were less appre-
ciative this large business
could not have become so
large. We enjoy visitors.
Come in and get acquaint-
ed. Need not buy
THE ANN ARBOR ORDAN 0O01
S. MAIN ST ,r
STUDENTS!
IF YOUWANT
Bargains
B11th 1S
Books
CALL AT THE
STUDENTS' BOOKSTORE
Law and Medical Books, Greek
Latii. Mathematical and all Col-
lege Text Books at reduced rates
to students. Drawing Instruments
and Engineers' Supplies.
WE SELL TH BEST AND
CHEAPEST FOUNTAIN PEN
MADE.
SHEEHAN & CO..
STATE STE ET.
THE LEADING TAILOR
AND IMPORTER.
The latest and most Fashionable
Foreign Fabrics for Men's Wear.
The Largest Stock in the City.
NO, 2 E. WASHINGTON ST., NEAR MAIN.
WE HAE WHAT YOU WANT,
We can meet your needs in the
-way of text-books, supplies, etc., no
matter what your class or depart-
ent, at either of our stores, and we
have the right kind at the right
price. Bring around a list of your
wants; a trial .purchase is the best
indicator as to- Where you should
trade all the year.
We buy sell and exchange second-
hand books in largequantities, and
can offer you specia t bargains in
this line. We are sole agents for
the celebrated Waterman fountain
pen--everyone guaranteed. You'll
also find the best University Station-
ery, Note Books, Drafting Supplies,
Sweaters, etc., at special rates at
t Tewe fDows Tows
vUni rityBooktore, Opposite Cour House
2155.State St - 4NMale St

FOUR YEARS OF RHETORIC.
THAT MUCH IS NOW OPEN TO
UNDERGRADUATES.
Some New Courses Introduced by
Prof. Scott-Innovations Last Year
gWere a Success and Will Be Con-
tinued.,
Within the last few years the courses
in rhetoric and composition have been
reorganized and the numbers tnureas-
ed. in the announcement for 1895-06
appear ten courses, eight of which are
for undergraduates. Considering the
smallness of the number of those who
teach- these subjects and thegreatness
of the number of those who elect the
courses, this is a remarkable showing.
Several innovations made last year
by Prof. Scott have been sucessful
in, practice, and will be retained, for
the future. In particular, the new
arrangement of Course 2, adopted last
semester, has been found especially
advantageous. By this arrangement
a student who has had Course 2 one
semester may re-elect it as a two-hour
course the following semester, the
work of the two semesters being dif-
ferent. Last year over a fourth of the
first semester's class continued their
work through the second semester.
Two new courses have been added.
Course 1, offered this semester, is
called exercises in translation. It
gives the student who is familiar with
French and German an opportunity
to improve his English by translating
brief selections from French and Ger-
man literature. The method to be
employed is somewhat novel, being
based upon a study of the French and
the German paragraph.
Course 15, Principles of Style, will
this year be followed in the second
semester by Course 1a. The first
semester's work will be in the i-rose
of the 17th end 18th centuries; the
second semester's in the prose of the
19th century.
The addition of new courses makes
it possible for a student to pursue
studies in rhetoric and composition
throughout the four years of his col-
lege life. In order to do this, if le
takes but one course each semester he
should elect courses 1 and la in his
first year, courses 2 and 2a in is sec-
ond year, courses 1 and i1a in his
junior year, courses 1 and 18 in his
senior year. -
For graduate students there is a
seminary in the History of Rhetorical
Theory, which is carried pn throughout
the year-
E. J. Ottaway, '94, was managing
editor of the Petoskey Daily Resorier
string the season just nast. Ie is
now on the Ann Arbor Argus."

POOTBALL PRACTICE.
The First Line-Up of the Season
Yesterday.
A good sized crowd were out yes-
terday afternoon to see the first line-
up of the candidates for this year's
eleven. After a little preliminary prac-
tice the two teams lined up for prac-
tice. Yale, a new ina, was put in for
center on the 'Varsity, with Henninger
and Raikes as guards. Richards and
Holmes were both tried at quarter-
back, and Gates, Rice, Ferbert, Freund
and Richards took their turns at the
halves. Villa and Yont played the
tackles; and Senter and Hutchinson
the ends. Le Roy was at full back.
The work showed the training which
the team has had this season, but
there was considerable fumbling and
raw playing. The main trouble was
in the slowness with which the ball
was gotten into play, it being often
fumbled after it had been snapped
back in good form.
Holmes is quick and is making a
good showing for quarter. Richards'
also did some good work at both quar
ter and half. Forbert plays his half
in good chaps. Raikes made.a good
showing at guard, and Hooper will be
here today as another candidate for
the position. Carr will also try for it
in case l1e does not make center.
Myers, the new candidate for center,
will also be out today. Le Roy played
full back in good shape and punted
well. Villa and Yont have a good
chance of "holding their positions as
tackles, although Hadden may be back
later in the season. The second eleven
also showed up well and although they
-were lacking in weight, they tackled
in good form and developed some ex-
cellent material. A meeting of all
candidates was held at 7 o'clock last

1

NUMBERS NOT GIVEN OUT.
IMPOSSIBLE TO ESTIMATE AT-
TENDANCE FOR YEAR YET.
Pres. Angell Tells a Daily Repre-
sentative of the Enrollment-New
Diploma Schools and Late Open-
Ing Make It Less.
As usual at the beginning of the
University year, all sorts of rumors
are in circulation as to the enrollment,
estimated attendance, etc. This year
it is being reported that the enrollment
for the past few days has fallen far
short of that at the same time In pre-
vious years, thus making it appear
that the outlook for attendance is not
what could be wished.
When questioned as to the above re-
port by a representative of the Daily
yesterday, President AngelI said:
"It is absolutely impossible at this
time of year to form any trustworthy
estimate of the attendance for the
year. We always refuse - to give the
exact numbers enrolled in the various
departments until several weeks after
the beginning of the year; for, If we
should give them out this early, they
would be sent all over the country as
our final figures for the year.
"You may say in general, however,
that up to this morning the enroll-
ment has fallen somewhat short of
that at the same time in previous
years. This is giving us no alarm,
however, as it is explainable on sev-
eral grounds. In the first place there
aere a number of important additions
made last year to the list of schools
whose students are admitted on di-
plomas and consequently there is a
smaller number coming early to take
the examinations.
"Then, too, the University opens
Tuesday this year instead of Mone.iy,
as is usual, and the new students en-
tering on diploma and old students
are returning one day later than us-
msl. If you will look into Room A,
you will see how they are crowding in
with their credentials."
Bible Institute Begins Sunday.
A Bible Institute will be held in
Newberry Hall, commcencing next Sun-
day evening at b o'clock and lasting
four days under the auspices of the
Bible Chairs- and conducted by Ernest
D. Burton, professor of -New Testa-
ment interpretation in the l nlvecsity
of Chicago, and H. L. Willeti, acting
Dean of the Disciples' Diviniity Iouse
of the tUniversitiy of Chicago. The
general themes a%1l h' tevix';tiner-
illy 'accepted esItle ofI'11ul; idder
charge of Mr. Button; and Pls 'iT sta-
ment hittry, utnlet ch'ati^t'f r Wil-
lett. Thefull pro t-alnllwillbe, printed
later. -A.cordiala-invilotion-is cxed-
ed to students and all others to a-
tend this institute.

night, when the scrub eleven were,
given signals and the regulars taken
to the gymnasium for signal practice.
The teams will again line up at the
athletic field at 3:30 this afternoon.
Courses of Bible Study.
The following courses of study for
University students will be offered this
year under the auspices of the Bible
chairs: Life of Christ, History of
Israel, Gospel of John, Book of Acts,
s Epistle to the Hebrews, Philosophy of
5 Religion, Life and Letters of Paul,
The Maccabees and the Herods; Early
IChurch History, History of Missions,
Normal S. S. class, Christian Ethics,
making 12 courses in all.
Classes will be formed in the alcove
courses, in Newberry Hall, at hours to
suit the convenience of students. For
foll information call at Newberry Hall
rei 2 to 4 p. m. or address the in-
structors, G. I. Coler, 5 S. University
acce., or C. A. Young, 46 ladisoei st.

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