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January 25, 1896 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1896-01-25

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~th U, of

Alt. Wail II,

VOL. VI. No. 83. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1896. FOUR PAGES-3 CENTS.

ONE GUITAR
Is enough for one person to
play on at one time. One
guitar is not enough, how-
ever, to supply 3,000 stu-
dents. That's why we have
constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of various
makes and prices.
BETTER .OOK AT OUR
U OF M. GUITARN
It's good as its name.H
THE ANN ARBOR ORGAN GO,
S. MAIN ST.
ATTENTION!
Take advantage of the
Money IGttig SaIe!
-TILL-
February 1st,
-AT-
JACOBS & ALLMAND,
See our Show Window.
TakeNotice.
In'order to reduce my stock of
Fall Woolens, I will offer all Fancy
Suitings at cost for cash and make
room for Spring Importations.
An early call will profit you. At
G. H. WILD,
The Leading Tailor,
2 E. Washington St., Near Main.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ILLUSTRATIVE CASES
-ON-
PERSONAL PROPERTY,
Selected by Prof. Levi T.
Griffin, of the Law Depart-
ment,
NOW ON SALE
-eAT-
WAR RE'S,
Up Town, Down Town.
tiversit Booktore, Opposite Cotouse
20. State St. 4 N. Main t.

TALMAGE IS ELOQUENT.
THE GREAT DIVINE IS PLEASING
TO A LARGE AUDIENCE.
He Tells of His Journey to Europe
and the Orient-Of Nicholas II
and W. E. Gladstone.
To give but a brief account of a lec-
ture delivered by T. DeWitt Talmage
is aii injustice.
It is an Injustice to the speaker, a
injustice to the reader and an injustice
to the lecture. Consequently a Tal-
mage sermon is always given its due
merit by being given in full. But
space will not permit here.
Dr. Talmage was greeted last even-
lug by one of those audiences that
generally greets this great man when-
ever his voice is heard.
After a formaa .introduction Dr. Tal-
mage began his lecture on his trip
around the world by saying a ninee
days' journey landed him at the Ha-
waiian Islands. le described their
beauty, their grandure, their fruits
and products and the stability of their
new republican government..
He next told of his visit to New
Zealicndanti le wonderfuei scndt f
Australia. Here lie dwelt at some
lengthO inthe glorious future of this
beautiful island far in the Pacitic.
Arriving at Ceylon and India he told
of the beauties of the Hindoo temples,
the costliness of their adornment and
the stately grandure of their icipres-
siveness. Ite told of the cruel atro-
cities of the lindoos to the mission-
aries in a manner as only Dr. Talmage
can tell it. He told of the beauties of
the ancient Hindoo tombs, of their
composition, their ucagnificence, their
sacredness.
Dr. Talmage next related Isis smeet-
ing with Czar Nicholas It at his is-
perial palace in St. Petersburg. He
told of the pleasant and goodly nature
of the czar, his majestic form, his
stately stature, his maclines of char-
acter, and his Christian home. He it
was that was born to rule, he it is that
is fitted to govern.
Dr. Talmage next told of his visit to
Moscow. How-at sunset lie heard the
ringing of the famous bells of that
city. Standing on a tower with bells
around him ringing and bells below
him ringing and bells from tice 1,400
towers of Moscow all reverberating
their sweet tintinabulations was a sen-
sation awful, sublime, majestic. And
as the sun setting in the west cast its
parting streamer upon the golden tur-
rets of those 1,400 towers it brought
to the imagination of this great and
goodly man the vision of the burning
of Moscow.
Leaving Moscow Dr. Tahage next

shook hands xith the "Gra"n old
man" William E. Gladstone. He told
ihow ie and Mr. Gladstone ran beside <
each other in the latter's gardens and
amused themselves by living Glad-1
stone's favorite dog return sticks as
Mr. Gladstone would spit upon them
and throw them far out upoi the lawn.
Next was his return to America.
Yes, said Dr. Talmage, all tice iactiocs
of the earth have I visited yet none
are so lovely as Accerica, America.
DR. DOCK WILL NOT GO. 1
Has Declined to Accept the Offerf
of Jefferson Colege.
Accncg the iany things of interest
taken up at the meeting of the board
of regents Wednesday was the offer
made to Prof. George Dock, in an in-
crease of $500 salary, icakig isisal-
ary $2,500 a. year, to take effect next
October, also to rent or build a suit-
able buildinsg for laboratory purposes,
a corps of assistants, much needed
hospital appliances and to better the
condition of the medical department in
general, in order to keep l1m at this
institution, aid from accepting the
chair of theory and pracice offered
by Jefferson Medical College at 'Mila-
delphia. Dr. Dock wa seen lst even-
ing and announceds isintentions of
accepting the rcgens' offer. He ac-
cordingly notified Jeiersoni Medical
College to that effect, declining the
proffered chair at that college.
"Mrs. Jarley's Wax Works."
At a meeting of the Woman's League
yesterday a deinite decision was ar-
rived at concerning the proposed en-c
tertainment for the benefit of the
Gymnasium fund. "Jarley's Wax
Works" will be presented April 24 and
25. This date has been selected to
avoid the contlict with the play of
Julius Caesar to be given by the Ora-
torical Association.
Miss McCobb, of Portland, Me., who
will be in the West at that time will
have charge of the entertainment.
There will be about eighty characters,
forty men and forty woinen. The
scheme of the play includes a miscel-
laneos chamber, a classical esanuber
and an historical chaisUer. Miss Mc-
Cobb comes with highest recommenda-
tions from places where this entertain-
ment has been given.
Tultion Free.
At a special meeting of the execu-
tive boards of the Women's League
Jan. 24th, it was decided that the
t league offer matriculation and tuition
fees for one year, to any member of a
high school the courses of which are
approved by, the University of ieh-
igan, who will raise $500 for the
t women's gymnasium.

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON
SPEAKS ON THE "ELEVATION OF
THE NEGRO RACE."
He Tells of His Humble Life-
Conditions of His People-His In-
stituteatTuskegee-Its Influences,
It has been a long time since an
audience in University Hail has been
more completely captivated than it
was at the address of Booker T. Wash-
ington yesterday afternoon. Every
bit of available space in the lower
floor as well as a goodly part of the
gallery was filled. 'resident Angell
introduced the distinguished educator,
who then spoke for an hour on the
"Elevation of the Negro Race." His
address, interspersed at frequent in-
tervals, with amusing incidents and
witty sayings, was a strong one and
the audience broke out time after
time with tutuos applause, and it
was only with difficulty that President
Angel was able to obtain alc audience
at the conclussion in order to state that
he would be the medium for forward-
ing any gifts to the Tuskegee iti-
tute.
The steaker began by relating the
history of his early life, of his birth
in a log cabin, of his saking his way
to and hismeeting with General Arm-
strong at Hampden, and of his conse-
quent trip to the "blaick belt" to aid
in the uplifting of his race. tie then
followed with a diseriptioin of the Tus-
kegee School, of which he is president.
Fromi a very humble start the insti-
tute has now grown to assume large
proportions; thirty-seven buildings, all
but three of which have been erected
by the students, and a large tract of
land in the heart of Aabama are its
possessions.
It is the policy of its faculty to make
the institute primarily one of manual
training. The boys are taught in
scientific lines, and tice study of the
classies is avoided. The girls are in-
structed in laundry work, etc., and
an opportunity is offered to poor and
worthy students of either sex to work
their way.
Speaking of the elevation of his fel-
low-uegroes he said that it was the
duty of the north to help the south
and see that leaders were created to
help on the cause. "The condition of
the negro in the south," said Mr.
Washington, "is deplorable. Eighty-
five per cent work on plantations, and
three-fourths of them live on mort-
gaged land. nut the condition is not
such that the problem of uplifting is
hopeless. We are trying to undo in
thirty years, the results of opposing
centuries. The negro of Alabama is
(Continued on fourth page.)

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