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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

January 21, 1896 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1896-01-21

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Iw El. of Al. Wail.
VOL. VI. No. 79. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1896. FouR PAGES-3 CENTS.

" t { i

I ONE GUITAR
Is enough for one person to
play on at one time. One
guitar is not enough, how- 1
ever, to supply 3,000 stu- 11
dents. That's why we have j,
constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of varios
makes and prices.
BETTER LOOK AT OUR
U. OF M GUITAR.
It's good as its name.
THE ANN ARBOR ORGAN CO.,
S. MAIN ST.
For a Stylish
FULL DRESS OR TUXEDO
CALL ON
Jos. . Kollau,
Merchant Tailor,
Strictly high grade work at
moderate prices.
10 E. Washington St.
2d Semester.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DANCING
Opposite LAW building.
TERMS $5 FOR THE REST OF THE YEAR.
TakeNotice.
In order to reduce my stock of
Fall Woolens, I will offer all Fancy
Suitings at cost for cash and nike
room for Spring Importations.
An early call will profit you. At
G. H. WILD,
The Leading Tailor,
2 E. Washington St., Near Main.
-+ UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ILLUSTRATIVE CASES
-ON---
PERSONAL PROPERTYI
Selected by Prof. Levi T.
Griffin, of the Law Depart-
ment,
NOW DON SALE
-AT-
WAH R'S.
Up Town, own Twn,
Uniersty Sooktere, Opposite CourtHouse
20, State St. 4N.Main St.
Advertise in the Daily

SCENES IN LUTHER'S LIFE.
LECTURE BY PROF. HINSDALE
IN UNITY CLUB COURSE.
Description of "Homes and Haunts
of Luther"-Birthplace of the Ger-
man Revolution as Seen by the
Lecturer.
An interesting lecture in the Unity
Club series was that delivered lat
night by Prof. B. A. Hinsdale on the
"Home -and Haunts of Luther." The
material for tis lecture was drawn
mainly by Prof. Hinsdale from per-
sonal observation during a recent trip
atroad.
"In the broadest sense, wherever the
Protestant religion prevails, there is
the Luther country," said Dr. Hins-
dale. "There were reformers before
Luther, as there were heroes before
Agamemnon and Achilles, but he it
was who usheredYin the period of re-
ligious dissent to which we apply the
names Protestant and Reformation.
In la narrower sense Germany is the
Luther country. The Reformer was a
German by birth and training, by
character, taste and sympathies; and
go where yo" wiil in the fatherland
you are never long out of sight of
some material symbol of the deep im-
pression that he made upon his coun-
trymen. But, properly speaking, the
Luther country is central Germany,
portions of Prussia and Saxony and
parts adjacent where Luther spent his
life and did his work."

REV. T. DeWITT TALMAGE.
Press Comments About the Dis-
tinguished Lecturer,
There is about Talmage a veheot-
ence, ai urgency, an earnestness,
which sometimes carries him away as
in a kind of wild whirlwind. He las
iiiense command of words and great
fhuency of speech, but he is not diflutss
--mnything but that. His sentences,
some of tCeai especially, fall with a
force and a strength which is some-
times almost painful. Thrse is a reek-
less abanton about many of his ser-
ions, a plain outspokenness, which
is ~as refreshing as a dip into a moun-
tain streran on a hot summer's lay.
He has now the largest congregation,
ard, pehaptis, the most poitirfcl
ciuirclain An esea.-ttartle*oor (Eng-
lantd) NorthernElts.
He defies criticism. Th ttitti~mpt to
do anything but listen to those sea-
tenees, now short, sharp, aol ringing,
and now tirawn out with a 14laitire-
ness that will linger after his voic.'
has died away; to do anything but
laugh at those tine hits,-that delicatie
sarcasin, umimicryt at is the perfec-
tion of acting,-or to feel so very, very
serious when, in moment, you tre
carried frot laughing to a sober, sol-
emn reflection; the attempt, in fine, to
be anything else but in complete har-
miony with the speaker, and to ac-
knowledge his absolute sway, is so
vain that it needs only to be mention-

MANY MEDICAL STUDENTS.
ENROLLMENT IN MEDICAL DE-
PARTMENT VERY LARGE.
Laboratories Are Crowded-Lower
Classes Large, But the Work Is
Not Slighted-180 Freshmen and
Increase in Other Classes.
The medical department of the Uni-
versity has the largest enrollment this
year of any time since the adoption
of the four years' course. A very no-
ticeable feature of this is the size of
the lower classes; the freshmen are in
the lead for the same period. with 10
students; all but ten of the present
sophomore closs returned in October
and the higher classes are exception-
ally well represented.
The twolower classes being of such
a large size they have completely filled
all the desks in the different labora-
tories. The mosti crowded laboratory
is the bacteriologieal under the super-
vision of Prof. F. G. Novy, with sev-
enty-two students including four post
graduates. Four tables were put in
the main ronm during vacation giving
in all twenty-six tables for students,
while the rest are at work in two ad-
joining rooms. Not withstanding the
cramped quarters, the eourse has not
depreciated any, and is supplied with
the best working miaterial of any lab-
oratory in this science in the United
States.
There are ninety-six students at
work ii the anatomical laboratory sur-
ing this twelve weeks course, eight
students on a "subject," as the supply
of the latter is short. There are
about seventy engaged in the quali-
tative chemistry course, which is pret-
ty full. Prof. Htuber's laboratory in

Prof. Hinsdale described Eisleben, ed,aid tried, to shwo Isis power.-

Wittenberg, Erfurt, Eisenach and the
Wartburg, as they aipear at the pres-
est time and told of the changes they
have undergone since the life-tune of
Luther. The many dramatic acts in
the reformer's life were brought out
clearly by the lecturer's narration of
his journey through the places in
which they occurred and where the
work of the reformation was begun.
Referring to Luther's character,
Prof. Hinsdale said: "It was remark-
able, full of force and gentleness; bold
and tender; radical and conservative,
abounding in humility and in self as-
sertion; full of theology and music; an
ecclesiastic and a poet; overfiowing
with violence and rage, and yet most
cautious and prudent; containing the
seeds of rationalism and filled, with
superstition. He hurls the ink stand
at Satan and says 'I will not' to the
emperor, but his heart breaks and
flows out in tears over the dead body
of his little child."
Dr. George Dock's lecture which had
been announced as the next in the
Unity Club series has been postponed.
In its stead a lecture' will be delivered
next Monday night by Rev. J. C. Kim-
ball on "The World's Coming Better
Social State as Evidenced by Evolu-
tionary Principles.'

Philadelplisa Press.
Mr. Talmage is a pulpit phenomen-
on. He is dramatie, and cannot des-
cribe without acting. Ile has a clear,
incisive mind, a broad and genial hu-
mor a kindly sympaathy. a vivid im-

1 a, -'- - - - - -1 histology is full, likewise the course
agination, vehement passion, and every in eleetro-therateutics. The phyalo-
ino tleets.-herwpYtirk. hedependent.
blowvtells-New York Independent. Ilogical chemistry laboratory has about
Mr. Tamage isa prove tt ie a sixty-fivesophomores at work, every
gather a regular Sabbath congrega- desk being occupied.
tion of 5,000 hearers, and that he can
make himself effectively heard by thnt Jeffersonian Preliminary Debate.
number of people. He is one of those T -
preachers who really belong to man- The Jeffersonian Society will hold
kind at large. Most people who try their preliminary debate Thursday
to describe Dr. Talmage begin by say- night to choose three debaters to repre-
ing that he is like somebody, or unlike sent tLe society in the annual debate
somebody else. Now, the fact is, that with the Webster Society. The ques-
lie is not like any other person at all.
He is just "Talmsage" all over, with as thon to be debated at the preliminary
much marked individuality as ever is "Resolved, That the United States
was concentrated in any one man.- senators should be elected by popular
Union Era. vote," and the contestants are: Afiirm-
Seats in Hospital Amphitheater. ative, Messrs. E. L. Norris, D. S.
Ewing, E. Hanson, C. H. Stranahan
Dr. Campbell assigned seats to mem- amid . Smith, negative, Messrs. 0.
hers of '96 and '97 M, in the Univer- Huff, Chadman, J. W. Hart, A. Kep-
sity Hospital amphi"he"ter yesterday ner and E. Block. The Webster so-
and announced that any medical stu-
dent w'ishing adniission to the amphii- ciety held no preliminary this year,
thea-ter would have to show tickets at but in place chose their representatives
the entrance. Tickets of admission by election. They are Messrs. B. E.
can be procured from Dr. Campbell Nussbaum, E. C. Ryan and D. I.
upon application. Minor.

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