100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

November 20, 1895 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tt.

At. Wailn.

VOL. VI. No. 45.

UNI ERlS TY OF MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1895. FoUn PAGES-3 CENTS.

till
~DONE GUITAR g
Is enough for one person to
S play on at one time. One tl
guitar is not enough, how-
ever, to supply 3,000 stu- P
dents. That's why we have
t constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of various
makes and prices.
BETTER LOOK AT OURt
O. OF M. GUITAR.
It's good as its name.
" HE -AA ARBOR ORGAN 00.,9
S. MAIN ST.
AT --.we
Sheehan's
You can find the largest and most
complete stock of
SWEAIAS A-V
in the city. We rake them to
order, in any color, design or
style desired.
Agoents for the celebrated
E0, S. PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS
Engraved visiting cards we sup-
ply in five days.
SH EEHAN & O..
30 S. STATE STREET.
THE LEADING TAILOR
AND IMPORTER.
The latest and most Fashionable
Foreign Fabrics for Men's Wear.
The Lirgest Stock in the City.
NO, 2 E. WASHINGTON ST., NEAR MAIN.
W-LD

i _ .

TriE CONCEJT LAST NIGHT.
FIRST NUMBER IN THE CHORAL
UNION SERIES
Given by the Chicago Orchestra
Ideas of Theodore Thomas-The
Program as Given-Indications for
the Course.
Theodore Thomas, the great orches-
tral leader has delighted the music-
loving pubic for many years, hut
seldom has an audience been more
satisfied with an evening's programn
than was the one gathered in Univer-
sity Hall last night. From the first
wave of the baton introducing the
overture from Humperdink to the last
sweep closing the great symphonic
poem, Garka, from Smetana, the vast
audience sat in breathless silence ii
order not to lose a single sond that
the great conductor called forth from
the musicians about him.
Mr. Thomas is professedly an edu-
cator. Ie believes in bringing the
popular taste up to his standard and
not in lowering his standard to the
popular taste. No doubt the Ameri-
can people has him to thank, in no
small measure for its present musical
disposition and standing.
Symphonies predominated in the
concert last night and consequently
part of the program could be thor-
oughly enjoyed only by one with culti-
vated musical taste; but as Mr. Thom-
as said at the close of the same pro-
grans in Detroit, "If you give the peo-
ile apple pie, after awhile they will
begin to think they must have apple
pie and doughnuts all the time."
In accordance with his custom, Mr.
Thomas responded to no encores al-
though they were frequently called
for. Taken all in all, the concert was
one of the best and most favorably
received that Theodore Thomas has
yet conducted in Ann Abor.
The following is the program as ren-
dered:
Overture-Dream Music, Hansel and
Gxretel..-.............Humperdiick
Symphony, No. 7, in A, (Poco Sos
tento-Vivace, Allegretto, Pres-
to, Allegro con Brio.. ..Beethoven
Intermission.
Overture--Genoveva-...... Schumann
Symphonic Variations op. 78..Dvorak
Symphonic Poem. Garka....Smetana
The hall was completely filled and
all indications show that the Choral
Union Series will be more successful
than ever before. The attendance at
the first concert shows clearly that the
proposed auditorium seating 16,000
will be a necessity before many years
have passed. The next concert in the
course comes Dec. 2, a song recital
by De Vere-Sapio. The Thomas Or-
chesta will give a second concert on
April f, and will no doubt be greeted
by a crowded house.

WEST AGAINST EAST.
Minnesota and Wisconsin Want to
Meet Columbia.
New York, Nov. .-Columbia col-
lege has received two challenges from
western- universities for boat races
next year. One is from the University
of Minnesota and the other from the
University of Wisconsin. The former
is willing to come East next spring
and pay all its expenses if Columbia
will in turn go West the following year
under the same conditions. Wisconsin
has made no propositions as yet, but
ihais sent a challenge with the hope of
coming to a decision as to where it
shall be rowed later on.
The challenges were brought up be-
fore the last meeting of the Columbia
college union and it was decided to
hand them over to the rowing board
to answer as it thought best. Columbia
is in favor of rowing the colleges, but
says it is out of the question for it to
go West, for it would interfere with
the tri-collegiate race at Poughkeep-
sie. It is possible that should these
Western Universities come East they
would be admitted to the Poughkeep-
sie race. Cornell and Pennsylvania
are in favor of seeing as many crews
row together as is Columbia.
CHICAGO WORKING HARD.
They Will Probably Have a Game
Saturday,
The Chicago Itecord of yesterday has
the following item concerning Chica-
go's teami
"The Chicago first team rested yes-
terday, but will begin hard work again
tomiorrow in preparation for the Midh-
igan contest on Thanksgiving day. It
is barely possible that Stagg will ar-
range for a ight practice game next
Saturday. The Beloit management
canceled its date with the 'varsity
some time ago, but has wired Stagg
that it is now willing to play the game
on Nov. 23, as previously agreed. The
'varsity management has not deter-
mined whether it will play the game
or not. If not, it is quite likely that
Stagg will arrange with some other
team for Saturday afternoon.,"
Former Student in Trouble.
Omar F, Neff, a former studethin
the la department here is in trouble
at Goshen, Indiana, on account of a
forgery, which it is alleged he execut-
ed. He was held yesterday to await
the action of the grand jury. Neff is a
married man and the soe of a promi.
nent Indiana clergyman. He was re-
cently tried on a criminal charge of a
like nature and acquitted.
D. F. Wilcox, '94, holds a fellow-
ship at Columbia this year.

A MAGAZINE LIST.
It Will Be Published by the Daily
Soon.
For some time there has been a want
of a classified list of the magazines
received at the general libary. About
450 are taken and new ones have been
constantly added, so it is practically
impossible to keep a list up to date.
Yet it has been felt that many of the
rarer magazines have not been used
as much as they should be because
of ignorance of the fact that they are
in the library.
The library authorities have ar-
ranged to give the Daily a classified
listi of all ithe magazines received.
This will be printed in sections in suc-
cessive editions of the Daily. It can
then be cut out and used for a refer-
ence list. It is hoped that all students
will bear this in mind, and take this
opportunity of securing a useful and
convenient list of the libnary mag-
zines. The list well be begun in about
a week.
THANKSGIVING DAY GAME.
It Will Be Called at 11 A. M.-Seats
Are Going.
The Chicago papers make the an-
nouncemnent that the Tlnksgiving
Day game will begin at11,a. in. They
state also that the reserved seats in
both new and old stands on 1farshall
Field are going fast.
Lecture by Prof. Kelsey.
Prof. Kelsey will lecture at the Pres-
byterian church Friday evening on "A
Summer at Pompeii." Prof. Kelsey
has spent much time in Pompeii and
has a large number of iteresting
stereopican views of lie ruins and
surroundings which will be used in il-
lustrating the lecture. Prof. Kelsey
gave this lecture at the University of
Wisconsin last year, and received
many flattering press notices. Prof.
Ga-rdaer-amson, of the Univesity
School of Music, will give Neapolitan
folk-songs, illustrating Italian summer
life. This lecture was to have been
given last spring, but was postponed
on account of Prof. Kelsey's illness,
All tickets sold then are good now.
The Rate Secured.
The requisite number has been- se-
cured to obtain the rate to Chicago.
The train leaves Wednesday over the
Ann Arbor roadTickets aregood up
to Dec. 2. The fare will be $5.
For a New Grand Stand.
The Board of Control has petitioned
Pres. Angell for a new grandstand at
the athletic field. The Athletic Board,
at lts meeting last night, resolved to
second this petition.

AT WAHR'S
HAVE YOU READ IT?
College Girls,"
By Abbe Carter Goodloe. Il-
lustrated by Charles Dana
Gibson. For opinions ask
your neighbors. Now on sale
at
Up Town, Down Town
niversity Bookstore, Opposite CourtHouse,
4Ss. iae St. 4 N. Main St.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan