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October 11, 1893 - Image 1

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Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1893-10-11

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.5 JYERSITY OF MIChIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11. IsOS. I0~sv~, Tssuuc CENTS.

Vo. IV.--No. 10. U
SETTLED BY COMPROMISE.
The Lecture Association Fight
Happily Ended.--An Excel-
lent Course Arranged'
Ever since the split in the Lecture
Association last spring, caused by
she attempts of bothi is and laws
to hold supremacy in the affairs of
hie association, the final outcome
of the dispute has been the subject
of much speculation, and even of
some concern, lest a final disrup-
:ion of the association might result.
The rival boards then chosen have
seen unwearying in their efforts to
secure lecturers for the coming sea-
son, and were apparently determined
so fight it though to a final issue.
The refusal of the university au-
thorities to permit either faction to
,use University Hall, however, put
he matter in a new light and
prought both organizations to see
the necessity of a compromise.
This compromise was effected Mon-
day afternoonwhen committees from
either side met President Angell,
and arranged a settlement satisfac-
tory to all. As both courses could
not be given in full, selections were
made from the leading attractions,
as convenience of dates would per-
sit. The literary department course
retains Prof. Von Holst, Hon Jer-
ry Simpson, Hon. Roger Q. Mills,
Rev. F. W. Gunsaulus, Hon. Fred-
erick Douglass, and Hon. John J.
Ingalls, while the law department
course contributes its share with
Riley and Shirley, Marteau the vio-
linist, the New York Philharmonic
Club, and John T. Graves.
The course will be opened Oct.
i9, by Hon. Frederick Douglass.
he noted colored orator, who wil
,resent his views on "The Race
Problem.'' He will be followed omi
)ct 27, by Riley and Shirley ii
one of their characteristic enter-
anments. ion. Jerry Simpson;
.he Kansas statesman, will be her
Nov. 1o. His subject will be, "Somi
of the Causes of the Decline Jr
Agriculture.' The next lecture wil
lie by John Temple Graves, on Nov.
1u. In December two especiall)
fne attractions will be here, on th
8th, Marteau, the great French vio.
linist; on the 16th, Prof. Hermat
Von Holst, of Chicago University
who will lecture on "Toussain-
L'Ouverture." Rev. F. WV. Gun
saulus, who will be remembered foi

h

' IVERSITY OF ATICIIIGANT , WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER, 11, 1S93.

PRICE TimEE CENTS.

his scholarly and interesting lecture CORNELL'S ANNIVERSARY.
three years ago, will lecture Jan. A Quarter o a Ceury CompletedUTA
19, his subject to be announced la- Amidst Lively Scenes.where Elo-
ter. Another great musical treat quence ReIgned Supreme.
will be enjoyed Feb. 23, when the Twenty-five years ago Cornell -
New York Philharmsonic Club will University entered upon its success-
be here. Hon. John J. Ingalls will ful career, which has won for that O '
lecture March 19, on a subject not institutions a place aong the first 51 s.Mi Soe., 52e Agents.
yet fully decided. Hon. Roger Q. et We sell everything musical and nail our fait'
universities of the land. It is no t Qiiyadsur eln.
I Mills, O Texas, has been secured wonder, then that the Cornellians
t o hecoiiglcue nArl '2. Chickering Bros.
the closiig lecture on prit 2 are celebrating their quarter-centelr Mehlin PANos Erie
He will speak on "Thomas Jeffer- .r+umuler.
l s o o nial with so much ecc/!, for they
son and the Principles of Free Gov- have much to be proud of. -N O T I CE !--
ernment.'' We are here to stay. we are prepared to
lhe past three days have. been give aciass of work to the trade of this city
The compromise arranged also unequaied by any other house ever located
tdevoted entirely to the celebration, iere and not excelled by any City Tailor in
provides that Mr. W edemeyer and Unierit America, and at prices govern d by goods or-
and the University has been in holi- dered. Shitsfrom 30.Otlthirty dollars) to any
Mr. Powers shall share the office day attire. Hundreds of the old pricedesired. MineCustomTailoringby
of President, each to preside on five graduates have returned to their, . \ ,.
eeigM. Wkfeg n raduates haveretunedto teir .
evenngs. tr. Wakefield and Mr. alma mater to participate in her sil- I . 7 ANN STREET.
McKinney will divide the work of Coy-
,,oisrrhover anniversary. Many of
corresponding secretary. The other nail's prominent alumni had a place
offices are assigned as follows: on the program, during the three
price-president, S. C. Spitzer; re- days of the anniversary.
cording secretary, F. It. Petrie; Chauncey t. lepev, LI. D.,
treasurer, R. H. Whitten; assistant was the orator, and delivered one
treasurer, C. K. Friedman. The a rtr n eeoe Artistic Photographer, 6 E. HURON ST.
tra1 eC .Fidin h of his eloquent orations.
two co-ed directors remain to be Cornell has much to be proid of
chosen. Miss Lucy E. Textor will iii tierp history, tn be rig HOT LUNCHES,
_ ~in her past history, and with bright
probably be the representative of hopes for the future, her destiny is Lowney'$ (hocolates,
the lits. Another meeting will be --AT-r-
held Saturday to arrange a plan for secure. - "+TUTTLE'S
the election next spring, and to ap- i Football Among Our Rivals. E 48 S. STATE St.

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point ushers and committeemen.
Two dollars will be charged for the
course, as usual, and tickets will be
put on sale in a few days.
Inter-Collegiate Chess Tournament.
The second annual Inter-Collegi-
ate Chess Tournament between Col-
umbia, Harvard, Yale and Prince-
ton, will be held as usual this year
during the Christmas holidays. The
Inter-Collegiate cup given by grad-
hates of several colleges and subject
to challenge each year is now held
by Columbia. The tournament is
to be played in New York, and each
college will be represented by' two
men. As each man plays six games
the contest will last for that number
of days, after which each member
of the winning team will receive a
silver nmerdal. inter - University
Chess in England is an established
institution, especially between Ox-
ford and Cambridge, but this is the
first enterprise of the sort in Amer-
ica.
A new bulletin board has recently
been placed in the Engineering
building.

The elevens of all the universities
in the Northwestern Athletic Asso-
ciation are sure to be strong ones.
Last year the teams placed in the
field were as evenly matched as
could be desired, and almost every
game was a hard-fought one. This
year all the teams are practicing
steadily. Wisconsin, probably the
weakest of the teams last year, this
year expects to be one of the best.
Minnesota is sure to be one of our
hardest opponents. Northwestern
finds its principal strength i its
backs. Jewett and Noyes are two
half-backs that will hardly be equal-
led by any team in the association.
Griffith, the famous pitcher, at quar-
ter, and Sheppard at full-back, are
players of experience and help to
make Northwestern formidable be-
hind the line. Minnesota will be
our first opponent, meeting us here
Oct. 27.
Those desiring to take Prof.
Dewey's course in Development of
Early Christian Doctrine, are re-
quested to see Mr. Manny sometime
this week or notify him of the hour
that they prefer for meeting.

FIRST 1N ATIONAL BANK
OF ANN AISBOR.
Capita, 050,000. Surplus and Profits,30,0W.
Transactsageneralbankingtbusiness. For-
eign exchange bought and sold. Letters of
credit procured for travelers abroad.
P. BACl Pres. S. W.CL AKSON, Cashier.
GRANGER'S.ii
CLASSES IN DANCING will meet as
Cnliiii-s: G eteei, Saturday moerningis 10
and Torsday eveiiii7 :0; Ladie, Saterday
afternoons 4. Ladie ad enlsiemen, a-
viinied riases, Tuesday eveintgs S. If ratitl
loor. Manard stret. Tuition. one term
(twelve weeks> $5. Pupils received at any
time.
STUDENTS !
Trade at AR'S IiO)IiSTORE and
save money, A full line of Law, Meto-
cal and all Univei-sity 'eIxt-Iooks
5,000 BlanIk tioks at 2sc eacl.
Linen Paper, per pound 25c.
Buy the IDEAL WATFRMA' FeTNiAox PEN.
Best in the world- Every one guaranteed
for five years.
GEORGE WAHR,
LEADING BOOKSTORES.
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE,
W SoSuth Staite StreeL.
DOWN TOWN,
4 N. Main, opp. SourtHouse.

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