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October 09, 1893 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1893-10-09

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173a .

Vol. IV.-No. S.
A CLOSE SCORE.
'Michigan Wins From D. A. C. in a
Slow Game.-Detroit Boys
Play Pluckily.
The D. A. C.-U. of M. football
game on Saturday was a rather un-
interesting match, owing to the slow
playing and the lack of snap in team
work. The score of 6-o is no credit
to the U. of M. team, which should
have taken advantage of the D. A.
C.'s fumbling and slow movements
for several more touch-downs. In
fact, the fumbling was quite general
and the ball was continually being
lost on four downs by one side or
the other. Our men tackled poorly,
and showed little vim or precision
in their work. Our line showed up
very poorly at times, as did that of
the D. A. C. Much carelessness
was also displayed by some of our
men in getting off side. The crowd
was poor, only 300 or 400, and gave
little encouragement to our men in
the way of cheers.
At the beginning of the game the
D. A. C. took the ball and drove
the wedge right through our line for
a gain of twenty-five yards. Our
uen braced up, and got the ball on
fo'ur downs. After a punt and the
recovery of the ball, Michigan also
lost it on four downs. Detroit
made several short gains, and here
the ball, now near Detroit's goal,
changed hands three times through
failure to gain. Then Michigan's
line steadied, and Freund carried
the ball over, securing the first
touch-down in 16 minutes, from
which Dygert kicked a goal.
The D. A. C. took the ball and
worked the wedge for 20 yards.,
They then lost 5 yards on Perry's
off-side play, and next lost the ball
on four downs. Michigan then be-
gan tearing Detroit's line to pieces
and Freund and Avery were steadily
going up with the ball, when the
fumbling began again, and after the
ball had changed hands several times,
time was called for the first half.
At the beginning of the second
half, Michigan took the ball, and
after making good gains, lost it on
a forward pass. After it had again
changed hands several times, Michi-
gan nearly took it over Detroit's
line, when an off-side play cost 5
yards and four downs lost the ball.
Detroit now began steadily gaining,
and was here clearly out-playing our

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1893.

men. The backs went through and
around our line for from five to fif-
teen yards every time, and soon had
the ball within two yards of our
goal, when Michigan braced up and
got it on four downs. A few runs
placed our goal out of immediate
danger, and after considerable spar-
ring for time by the D. A. C., time
was called, no touch-down having
h been made in the last half

AN INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATE.
Arrangements for such a Debate
now well under Way--Success
almost Assured.
The committee in whose hands
was left the arrangement of an
inter-collegiate debate for this year,
report that in all probability arange-
meiits will be perfected for a debate
to take place somewhat earlier in

u%_L1 LIkk% LL LcLa3 Lc(L. he year than that given last year.
The line-up:N Whether Wisconsin will be the elect
). A.C. Position. V .o fM. contestant this year is extremely
epse ves Ed. vs.bes wdoubtful, for the reason that the
Leonar+-- Left Tackle-.. surbacl terns of debate last year were not
Peppers~
west.. Left Gard.-... v.CriBn acceptable to her and the Michigan
Wliii,,a -..... eater ---__ T. 0,-itS,,
.VerI . . . men did not feel that further con-
.ern Right GuaOrd-...1lemiillger
as g so e cessions were justifiable. Hence it
0-ir-the - Tascki..Aidri is that a sentiment has sprung up
Firbrotlier .sghtr Eid-- e in favor- of some other institution.
Mileod i Quarter Back --.......Baird Cornell has been mentioned as one
Dingwal-.v..- RaLeft. resd with whom a contest would develop
Gsssdrieis Rgt H l --- Aey t
Leonard ..Right Hall .Av-ey a great deal of interest in view of
Sanderson...... Full Back and Capt,..Dy-ert
Umpire-e.Bartell. Referee-Mr. Barbour. the close athletic rivalry existing
,--0-between the two institutions. Last
Tennis Men Meet. year the University of Chicago sig-
nified her willingness to arrange a
A number of the leading tennis joint literary contest, and it is not,
players of the University held a therefore, impossible that arrange-
meeting Saturday evening for the ments may be perfected with her.
purpose of discussing the tennis sit- ISt is desired by the committee
uation and prospects for the coming that the four literary societies-
year. Prof. Rolfe presided and L. Webster, Jeffersonian, Alpha Nu and
P. Jocelyn acted as secretary: Adelphi-should take the matter
The sentiments of the meeting into consideration at once and elect
were emphatically in favor of put- representatives empowered to meet
ting the tennis interests on a firmer for conference and arrange matters
basis than they have been before, and for the debate. This should be
of inaugurating a systematic method done at once in order to perfect all
of developing the tennis material of arrangements before the holidays.
college.-
To accomplish this, it was sug- A Collee Rush.
gested that a manager and a cap- A good old-fashioned college rush
tain be appointed, the former to was indulged in Saturday night by
look after the courts and all the ten- the '96 and. '97 literary classes.
nis paraphernalia, and the latter to The boys began to assemble about
have control of the players. These eight o'clock and an hour afterwards
officers would be under the direc- fully a hundred and fifty men on
tion of the Athletic board, which either side were lined up on the
would be appealed to for its sup- football field. At ten o'clock, after
port, financially and otherwise. W. the lines had come together four
D. McKenzie, '96, was selected to different times, with varying success,
go before the Board this evening neither side had gained any particu-
and present the views of the meet- lar advantage. The sophomores tried
ing. to divert the freshmen with over-
Football games Saturday resulted tures for a cane rush but the fresh-
as follows: Champaign 14, DePauw men were wary and refused the chal-
4; Pennsylvania 30, Colunsbus A: lenge. The rush was all over and
A. o; Wesleyan s8, Trinity o, the campus deserted before eleven
Princeton 12, Lehigh 0; Harvard o'clock. _
32, Amherst o; Yale 16, Crescent The west seminary room at the
A. A. o; Phillips Andover z8, Library was opened to students to-
Tufts 4; West Point 36, Lafayette o. day.

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DOWN TOWN,
4 N.VMain, opp. Court Hoise.

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