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October 11, 2012 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2012-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

health and wellness

Beaumont Health System,
Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit
and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit
invite you to the premiere of the
Beaumont Lecture Series
at The Berman Center for the Performing Arts
6600 West Maple Road, West Bloomfield

Wednesday, Oct. 17
7 p.m.

Welcome by Robert Folberg, M.D.
Founding Dean, Oakland University
William Beaumont School of Medicine

Introducing Brian Berman, M.D.
Pediatrician-in-Chief,
Beaumont Children's Hospital

Remarks by Jeffrey Maisels, M.D.
Professor, Department of Pediatrics
Oakland University William Beaumont
School of Medicine

0%,,
'" ■■ •

Keynote address by Michael Frogel, M.D.

Meeting the Unique Needs
of Children in Disasters:
Lessons Learned
from the Israeli Experience

Dr. Frogel is an internationally recognized expert
in emergency and disaster preparedness.
...,,,N.

Free Admission
Reception immediately following

RSVP
theberman. org and select "buy tickets"
or call 248-661-1900

Beaumont'

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OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT

50 October 11 . 2012

DETROIT
JEWISH NEWS

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Advocates For The Elderly

Teaching caregivers about Jewish
culture and traditions eases the
transition.

Karen Schultz Tarnopol
Special to the Jewish News

L

iving on our own can grow
more challenging as we age.
Things can become over-
whelming, and we may need assistance
with appointments, errands and other
basic needs as well as companionship.
Bringing a caregiver into your home
can be a great relief, but it also can be
very stressful. Hiring somebody who
is familiar with Jewish culture, beliefs
and traditions can make a big differ-
ence.
Shirley Zimberg provides sensitivity
training for healthcare workers who
work with Jewish seniors as a contrac-
tor through Peace of Mind Home Care,
a non-medical, private-duty home care
agency in Sterling Heights. She teaches
caregivers about Jewish holidays and
tradtions and keeping kosher.
Zimberg, 41, who runs Solutions for
Seniors, is married to Lenny Zimberg.
They live in Southfield with their two
children, Yael, 13, and Gavriel, 11. The
family belongs to Congregation Beth
Tefilo Emanuel Tikvah in Southfield.
Since 2001, she has been a practic-
ing geriatric social worker providing
patient advocacy, counseling, in-home
assessments and assisting with place-
ment of elderly family members.
"I found that senior patients didn't
always get all of the information they
needed to make informed decisions,"
Zimberg said. "I really believe in
empowering them to be involved in
making the decisions that affect their
lives."
She also noticed in her practice that
there was a need for healthcare work-
ers to understand the Jewish culture.
"There is a particular need for sensi-
tivity with patients who are Holocaust

Injured Major Leaguer
Finally Gets Turn At Bat
(JTA) It may have been the happiest
strikeout of Adam Greenberg's career.
Greenberg, who was beaned in
his only Major League at-bat while
playing for the Chicago Cubs in 2005,
returned to the bigs Sept. 2 on a one-
day contract with the Miami Marlins.
The lefty-swinging outfielder never
returned to the show, in part because
of excruciating headaches he experi-
enced as a result of the beaning.

Shirley Zimberg and Traci Adamczk

survivors, for example:' she said.
"They may have fears around trusting
others or concerns about showering.
I worked with a patient who was a
survivor, and he wanted to work with
somebody who could relate to him and
advocate for him."
Traci Adamczyk, president of Peace
of Mind, was already doing sensitivity
training for several other cultures in
the area when she and Zimberg met.
They agreed there was a need to edu-
cate caregivers working with Jewish
seniors.
The pair is presenting a lecture at
3:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, at the Oak
Park Jewish Community Center to
educate Jewish families and seniors
about training caregivers to be corn-
passionate toward each patient's cul-
ture and spiritual needs.
"I believe that many seniors look
toward their cultural and religious
heritage to help sustain them emo-
tionally while their physical needs
become more challenging," Zimberg
said. "Families that recognize this can
understand why sensitivity training
is such a vital part of their relative's
home care."
With their first Jewish patient in
place, Zimberg and Adamczyk already
have had positive feedback from the
patient's friends and family. E

But an online campaign resulting
from renewed interest in his story
following his appearance last month
as a player for Israel in the World
Baseball Classic qualifiers, resulted in
him getting a second opportunity.
Despite being retired on three
pitches by the Mets' R.A. Dickey — a
knuckleballer and perhaps the best
pitcher in the National League this
season — Greenberg carried a smile
back to the dugout along with his
bat.

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