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February 06, 2004 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Synagogues

SYNAGOGUES

from page

TEMPLE BETH EL

7400 Telegraph, Bloomfield Township, 48301, (248)
851-1100. Rabbis: Daniel B. Syme, David Scott
Castiglione. Cantor: David Montefiore. Services: Friday 6
p.m., 7:30 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Sunday 9:40 a.m.
Friday early service: family kabbalat Shabbat. Later
service: Brotherhood Shabbat. Saturday b'nai mitzvah of
Rachel Hannah Dickerman, daughter of Charlene Haines
and Steven Dickerman; Joshua - Douglas Finn, son of
Risa and Mark Finn.

TEMPLE BETH EL (FLINT)

5150 Calkins, Flint, 48532, (810) 720-9494. Rabbi:
Karen Companez. Cantorial soloist: Aleksander
Chernyak. Services: First Friday of the month 6:15 p.m.;
second Friday 8 p.m.; all other Fridays 8 p.m.

TEMPLE BETH EL (MIDLAND)

2505 Bay City Road, Midland, 48642, (517) 835-4822.
Guest teacher: Hal Greenwald. President: Stuart J.
Bergstein. Services: Friday 8 p.m. once a month.
Regularly scheduled High Holiday services for the tri-city
area.

TEMPLE BETH EMETH

2309 Packard, Ann Arbor, 48104, (734) 665-4744.
Rabbi: Robert D. Levy. Chazzan: Ann Zibelman Rose.
Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Family service
once a month at 7:30 p.m. replaces 8 p.m. Friday serv-
ice; call for specific dates.

BETH ISAAC SYNAGOGUE

2730 Edsel Dr., Trenton, 48183, (734) 675-0355.
Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. Congregational leaders con-
duct services throughout the year.

TEMPLE BETH. ISRAEL

801 W. Michigan Ave., Jackson 49202; (517) 784-3862.
Rabbi: Jonathan V. Plaut. Rabbi emeritus: Alan Ponn.
Cantorial soloist: Clara Silver. President: Dr. Cathy Glick.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. the first
Saturday of the month.

CONGREGATION CHAYE OLAM

4875 W. Maple Road, Bloomfield Twp. 48301-2805,
(248) 851-7485. Cantor: Stephen L. Dubov. Services:
Friday 7:30 p.m. Sunday 9:30 a.m.

TEMPLE EMANU-EL

14450 W. 10 Mile, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 967-4020.
Rabbi: Joseph P. Klein. Cantor emeritus: Norman Rose.
Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Friday,
Faculty Appreciation Shabbat. Saturday bar mitzvah of
Andrew Schwartz, son of Robin and Robert Schwartz.

TEMPLE ISRAEL

5725 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248) 661-
5700. Rabbis: Harold S. Loss, Paul M. Yedwab, Joshua L.
Bennett, Marla Hornsten. Cantor: Lou Corrsin. Cantorial
soloist: Neil Michaels. Rabbinic intern: Jennifer Tisdale-
Kroll. Services: Friday 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturday 10:30
a.m. Friday later service b'nai mitzvah of Alexandra
Hartman, daughter of Andrea and Michael Hartman;
Benjamin Young, son of Mindy and Joel Young. Saturday
baby naming of Emma Jordyn Gloetzner, daughter of
Elana and Michael Gloetzner. B'nai mitzvah of Evan
Hughes, son of Jodi and Paul Schaefer and John
Hughes; Nicole Hertzberg, daughter of Sima and Neil
Hertzberg. Havdalah bat mitzvah at 6 p.m. of Gabrielle
Pollock, daughter of Lisa and Fredrick Pollock.

TEMPLE KOL AMI

5085 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248) 661-
0040. Rabbi: Norman T. Roman. Rabbi emeritus: Ernst J.
Conrad. Cantorial soloist: Susan Greener. Services:
Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m.

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK

1924 Coolidge, East Lansing 48823, (517) 351-3570.
Rabbi Emeritus: Morton Hoffman. Rabbi: Richard Baroff.

2/ 6

2004

56

The Good, Bad And Ugly:
A Young Nation Exits Egypt

55

Jeffrey Ableser. Cantor: Marci Shulman. Services: 5:45
p.m. the first and last Friday of the month; 8 p.m. inter-
mediate Fridays.

Torah Portion

Cantor: Pamela Jordan Schiffer. Services: Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.

TEMPLE SHIR SHALOM

3999 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248) 737-
8700. Rabbis: Dannel Schwartz, Michael L. Moskowitz.
Cantorial soloist: Penny Steyer. Services: Friday 7:30
p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. Friday, Yoga meditation service.
Saturday, Ma'at Shabbat 9:30 a.m.

REFORM/RENEWAL

CONGREGATION SHIR TIKVAH

3900 Northfield Parkway, Troy, 48084, (248) 649-4418.
Rabbi: Arnie Sleutelberg. Services: Friday 7:45 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.

SECULAR HUMANISTIC

THE BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE

28611 W. 12 Mile, Farmington Hills, 48334, (248) 477-
1410. Rabbis: Tamara Kolton, Adam Chalom. Founding
rabbi: Sherwin T. Wine. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Tu
b'Shevat seder.

JEWISH CULTURAL SOCIETY

2935 Birch Hollow Drive, Ann Arbor, 48108-2301, (734)
975-9872. Board president: Karla Rice. School principal:
Ramona Brand. Shabbat services first Friday of every
month 7:30 p.m.; cultural Jewish celebrations, secular
bar/bat mitzvah programming, cultural Sunday school.

JEWISH PARENTS INSTITUTE

JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322, (248)
661-1000. Director: Marilyn Wolfe. Alternative cultural
Jewish celebrations; secular bar/bat mitzvah cere-
monies; adult programming; cultural Sunday school
from nursery through teen.

SHOLEM ALEICHEM INSTITUTE

28690 Southfield, Suite 293, Lathrup Village, 48076,
(248) 423-4406. Co-presidents: Alva Dworkin, May
Moskowitz. Holiday observances; Friday night oneg
Shabbat; cultural events.

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE ARBETER
RING

26341 Coolidge, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 545-0985.
Chair: Arlene Frank. Michigan district director: Ellen R.
Bates-Brackett. Year round holiday observances, Nokh
Shabbes Havdalah once a month; secular bar/bat mitz-
vah; Sunday school.

SEPHARDIC

KETER TORAH SYNAGOGUE

5480 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield, (248) 681-
3665. Rabbi: Michael Cohen. Services: Friday at candle-
lighting time; Saturday 9 a.m., Minchah 1 1/4 hours
before the end of Shabbat; Sunday 9 a.m.; Monday 7
a.m.; Wednesday 9 p.m., Thursday 7 a.m., 9 p.m.

TRADITIONAL

B'NAI DAVID

6346 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 100, West Bloomfield,
48322, (248) 855-5007. Cantor: Ben-Zion Lanxner.
Services: Saturday 9 a.m.

MANS

FLEISCHMAN RESIDENCE

6710 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322, (248) 661-
2999. Rabbi: Avie Shapiro. Services: Saturday and
Sunday 9:15 a.m. Minchah Monday-Friday 4:30 p.m.;
Saturday 1:30 p.m. Maariv Monday-Saturday 5:30 p.m.

YES H IVAT AKIVA

21100 W. 12 Mile, Southfield, 48076 (248) 386-1625.
Services: During the school year, morning services at
7:30 a.m.; afternoon services at 2:40 p.m. The commu-
nity is invited.

able in Egypt?" We Jews have always
had a charming sense of humor.
Moses tells them that God will do
the fighting and they should keep
their mouths shut. Indeed, God pro-
tects His people; and the next time
they open their mouths it is with
songs of praise. But shortly after,
Israel is complaining again, about th
he fog of ____" has become
water, about the food, about the
a common expression in
desert and about Moses himself.
the media, with the most
Even he complains to God, voicing
frequent application being
his
fear that the people are about to
the "fog of war."
stone him.
Cataclysms of violence have a way
By the end of our por-
of obscuring morality so
tion,
the internal Israelite
that defenders become
bickering
gives way to
attackers and vice versa, and
another
battle,
this time
the arguably noble princi-
with
the
nation
of Amalek.
ples which inspired a war
Perhaps
Israel
needed
an
succumb to the grisly reali-
external
distraction
to
over
ties of prevailing in battle.
come
its
incessant
infight-
Perhaps the most difficult
ing. Yet the bickering had
aspect of conflict is main-
taken a toll, and many
taining internal discipline,
Israelites
were killed.
so that a group remembers
RABBI
DANIEL
Indeed,
it
took a miracle to
its values and acts upon
get
them
through
the bat-
NEVINS
them on the battlefield as
tie.
Special to the
well as in the serenity of
According to the Torah,
Jewish News
home.
when
Moses raised his
Our dramatic Torah por-
hands,
Israel prevailed.
tion captures the peaks and valleys of
When
he
lowered
his hands, they got
conflict. There are beautiful, inspir-
routed.
The
rabbis
in the Talmud
ing moments — the song of Moses
(Rosh
HaShanah
29a)
ask why the
and Israel; the timbrels, dance and
hands
of
Moses
had
such
power.
song of Miriam and the women; the
They
answer
that
when
he
raised his
splitting of the sea and the manna
hands,
the
people
looked
to
heaven,
falling from heaven. Yet this portion
remembered
the
source
of
their
also preserves incredible bickering
strength and subjugated themselves
and confusion both within the
to God. Only in this way could they
Egyptian camp and among the
prevail.
Israelites.
What was true then obtains today.
You would think that after 10
When
we Jews fight among our-
plagues and the departure of the
selves,
we cannot succeed in even the
Israelites, Pharaoh and his people
best
of
circumstances. But when we
would cry, "Good riddance!" But in
unite and remember that God is the
chapter 14, they instead ask, "What
source of our strength, there is no
is this we have done, releasing Israel
obstacle that can stop us from suc-
from our service?" What follows is a
ceeding. Let us recall the raised
dramatic chase and an even more
hands
of Moses and transcend our
dramatic disaster for Egypt as the
differences
so that we may emerge
Reed Sea comes crashing over their
from
this
trying
era with integrity,
chariots and troops: "Horse and rider
strength
and
peace.
E
[God] has hurled into the sea!" So
much for staying on- message.
But what is truly surprising is the
amount of infighting among the
Israelites leading up to, and follow-
ing, the miraculous crossing of the
Why do you think the Israelites
sea. When the Israelites reach the sea
complained so bitterly about the
and hear the Egyptians hot in pur-
desert? Was slavery not as bad as
suit, they turn on Moses and ask why
we think, or was the "fog of nos-
he took them into the desert to die
talgia" distorting their memories?
— "were there too few crraves avail-
What painful memories do we
obscure and for what purpose?
Daniel Nevins is a spiritual leader at
Adat Shalom Synagogue.
Nk7

Tu b'Shevat
Shabbat Beshallach:
Exodus 13:17-17:16;
Judges 4:4-5:31.

T

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