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January 16, 2004 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Food

Just Desserts

Sylvia Lee discloses her secrets in the new "Desserts."

ANNABEL COHEN
Special to the Jewish News

r,

or nearly a baker's dozen years,
Bloomfield Hills resident
Sylvia Lee served up sweet
treats for a community hungry
for the flavor of homemade. She also sup-
plied desserts for some of the most
important food names in town.
Caterers, and restaurants such as the
Lark, were her best customers.
Now, 10 years after selling her
Southfield shop, she dishes up all her
delicious recipes in a picture-filled book
that'll have you licking the pages.
Desserts, said Lee, is a "delicious learning,
baking and eating experience."
"My style is not commercial," said
Lee. "It's good homemade stuff with
real butter, cream cheese, real lemon
peel, real apples. Basically, it's what
mothers and grandmothers made at
home, but dressed up a little, with pret-
ty decorations."
Her recipe style is different from most
books. Lee gives instructions as you read
the ingredients rather than listing ingredi-
ents and then offering directions. Her
book also includes decorating and baking
suggestions and techniques.
You can find Desserts at Esther's
Judaica in West Bloomfield, BookBeat
in Oak Park, Gift People in Franklin,
Warren Drugs in Farmington Hills,
Holiday Market in Royal Oak, Quarton
Market in West Bloomfield, Papa Jo's in
Birmingham and other stores around
town.
Here's a sampling of recipes from
the book:

FRAMBOISE TORTE
Batter:
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
2 T. raspberry liqueur
1 T. raspberry jam
1/2 cup plus 1 T. (1 stick plus 1 T.)
butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup flour
3 large eggs, separated
1/8 t. salt
1/4 t. cream of tartar
1/3 cup sugar
Frosting:
5 T. butter

3/4 cup whipping cream
1 cup cocoa powder, sifted
1 1/2 cups confectioners sugar, sifted
2 T. raspberry liqueur
Garnish:
1 cup chocolate shards, (recipe below
Preheat oven to 350E Grease an fl-
inch heart-shaped or round cake pan.
Batter: Combine chocolate chips,
raspberry liqueur and jam in a double
boiler or medium saucepan over low
heat, stirring until smooth. With a
hand-held mixer, slowly beat in butter
and sugar. Remove from heat and con-
tinue to beat, adding the flour and egg
yolks until smooth. Set aside.
In a separate bowl, beat egg whites
until peaks form. Slowly mix in the salt,
cream of tarter and sugar. Transfer egg-
white mixture to chocolate mixture;
using the hand-held mixer, mix for 10-
15 seconds. Transfer the batter to the
prepared pan and bake for 35 minutes.
Frosting: Melt butter in medium
saucepan over medium-low heat. Turn
off the heat and stir in whipping cream,
cocoa and confectioners sugar. On low
heat, stir until smooth, about 5 min-
utes. Cool slightly; stir in the liqueur.
Remove the cooled cake onto a serving
plate. Pour the frosting over the cake, tip-
ping the plate to spread evenly. Do not
use utensils on top to smooth the frosting
because they dull the finish. You may use
a spatula to smooth the sides, as they will
be covered with chocolate shards.
Press the chocolate shards into the sides
of the cake. Top the cake with a real or
silk rose. Makes one 8-inch torte.

CHOCOLATE SHARDS
1 12 oz. bag semisweet chocolate,
milk, white or butterscotch chips
Melt the chips in a double boiler over
medium heat, stirring until smooth.
Spread a large rectangle of the melted
chocolate, about 1 /4-inch thick, with a
spatula on a clean marble or Formica
surface. Let cool to room temperature.
With a paint scraper (about 2-3-inch-
es in size), or a small metal spatula,
scrape away from you, pushing scraper
on bottom of chocolate spread, creating
broken pieces in random sizes.
Store in a dry, sealed container.
Perfect for using on sides of cakes —
covers uneven glaze, uneven sizes and
adds great taste and texture.

Sylvia Lee puts her experience into her cookbook.

APRICOT POUND CAKE
1 cup (2 sticks) margarine, softened
1/2 cup (1 stick butter), softened
8 oz. cream cheese, softened
3 cups sugar
6 large eggs
3 cups flour
1 t. baking powder
1 t. vanilla extract
4 T. thick apricot preserves
2 T. apple jelly, melted
dried apricot rounds, optional
8-24 almond slices, optional
green gel ( in small tubes in your gro-
cery baking section), optional
Preheat oven to 325E Grease a 10-
inch Teflon tube pan well. Set aside.
Combine margarine, butter and cream
cheese in a large bowl. Mix well with an
electric mixer on medium speed until
fluffy. Beat in the sugar; mix well. Beat in
the eggs until combined. Turn mixer to
low; add flour, baking powder and vanilla
and beat until fully incorporated. Mix at
medium for 10 seconds more.
Spread half the batter in the prepared
pan. Use a spoon to create a "ring" in
the center of the batter in the pan.
Spread the "ring" with the apricot pre-
serves. Spread the remaining batter in
the pan. Bake for 70 to 80 minutes,
until a toothpick inserted into the cake
comes out clean.
Cool the cake to lukewarm and
unmold by putting a flat dish on top of
the pan and inverting the pan — one
palm on top of the dish and one palm
under the cake pan. Turn the pan
quickly. Using the same method, invert
the cake into an upright position onto
the serving dish.
Presentation: Brush the top of the cake

with the melted jelly and decorate, if
desired, by placing 1 to 3 apricots on top
of the cake and adding 8 almond slices
per apricot, pressed vertically around the
apricot to make daisies. Make flower
stems by squeezing gel into stems. Makes
14 to 16 servings.

ITALIAN CORNMEAL RING
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
3 1/2 cups confectioners sugar
4 large eggs
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 t. baking powder
1 cup milk
2 T. lemon juice
3/4 cup yellow•cornmeal
grated peel froml lemon
pulp from 1 lemon"
Preheat oven to 350E Grease a 10-
inch Bundt-type pan well. Set aside.
Beat butter in a large bowl with an
electric mixer at medium speed until
fluffy. Beat in the sugar until creamy.
Add eggs and beat until incorporated.
Reduce speed to low and beat in the
flour, baking powder, milk, juice, corn-
meal, grated peel and lemon pulp.
Increase speed to medium and beat for
10 seconds more.
Transfer the batter into the prepared
pan; bake for 40-50 minutes, until a
toothpick inserted into the cake comes
out clean.
Cool the cake to lukewarm and
=mold by putting a flat dish on top of
the pan and inverting the pan — one
palm on top of the dish and one palm
under the cake pan. Turn the pan
quickly. Using the same method,
invert the cake into an upright posi-
tion onto the serving dish. Dust with
confectioners sugar if desired. Makes
16-18 servings.

Vt<

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1/16
2004

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