100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 22, 2002 - Image 119

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Food

Chanukah Traditions

You can almost smell the latkes flying in oil this time of year.

ith Chanukah in the
air — starting Friday
night, Nov. 29 —
we're about to cele-
brate some ages-old traditions.
Our Chanukah traditions have
transcended the ages from more
than 2,000 years ago to the present.
Oil lamps are now candles. The
menorah, originally a candelabrum
with six wells, has metamorphosed
into the present-day eight candle
Chanukiah.
The miracle of the oil has been
played out in every symbol from
light to latkes. All these traditions
— millennia in the making.
Many insist Chanukah is for the
children. And they're exactly right.
It's commanded of us as Jews to
retell the stories of miracles to our
children and our children's children
— because youngsters learn first
through play and games and later
through study and routine.
The very young often associate
Chanukah with gifts and food. They
may enjoy receiving gelt and playing
dreidel, but when done right, they
also will learn in amusing and
whimsical ways that nes gadol haya
sham means "a great miracle hap-
pened there." .
Through our telling, children hear
about how the ancient Jewish Temple was reclaimed
after three years of fierce battle and ,against great
odds. They learn that the temple was cleansed and
rededicated on the 25th day of Kislev and that the
Temple's eternal light, the ner tamie4 was relit with a
small jug of purified oil — enough oil to burn for
just a single day. They also learn about the miracle
of the bit of oil that burned brightly for eight days,
which is why we celebrate Chanukah for eight days.
Every time you fry latkes and prepare your family's
traditional foods for the holiday, your children are
actively storing some wonderful Chanukah memo-
ries, to be rekindled again and again.

Essential Potato Latkes, Sweet
Potato Latkes and Ginger
Pearsauce

latke batter is too watery —
you'll know if the egg mixfure
spreads beyond the potato mix-
ture — you may need to add a
little flour, matzah meal or
breadcrumbs to the batter to
soak up the extra moisture.)
Working in batches, fry the
remaining batter. Serve the
latkes immediately; or, to keep
warm until needed, place them
on a paper towel-lined baking
sheet in an oven set to 250F.
Makes 24-30 latkes.

-

ESSENTIAL POTATO LATKES
This is a very basic version, with pure potato flavor
and a hint of onion. Omit the onion for the kiddies.
2 pounds peeled Russet or Idaho potatoes (this is
after peeled weight)
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 eggs
1 t. kosher salt, or to taste
1/2 t. ground black pepper, or to taste
Vegetable oil for frying

Using a hand grater or a food processor fitted with
a shredding disk, grate the potatoes. (Extra long
shreds from the processor disk may be chopped or
pulsed in the processor.)
Transfer the potatoes to a large colander and allow
to become dark. Rinse off the potatoes well, moving
them around with your hands until they are white
again.
Use your hands to press as much liquid from the
potatoes as possible (the drier they are, the better).
Transfer the potatoes to a bowl and stir in the
onions, eggs, salt and pepper.
Make a test latke: Heat 1/8-inch of the oil in a
large nonstick skillet over high heat until the oil is
hot but not smoking. Spoon 2 tablespoons of the
mixture into the hot oil. Spread the mixture into a
round with a fork or the tip of a spoon.
Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the
bottom of the latke is golden, about 5 minutes. Turn
the latke over and cook until it is golden on the
other side.
Drain the latke on a baking sheet lined with sever-
al layers of paper toweling.
Taste youf test latke for seasoning. Adjust the
amount of salt and pepper if necessary. (Note: If the

SWEET POTATO LATKES
1 1/2 pounds peeled sweet
potatoes or yams (this is after
peeled weight)
1 cup chopped red or Bermuda
onion
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
3 eggs
1 t. kosher salt or to taste
1/2 t. black pepper
Vegetable oil for frying.
Using a hand grater or food
processor fitted with a shred-
ding disk, grate the potatoes (Extra long shreds from
the processor disk may be chopped or pulsed in the
processor.)
Transfer the potatoes to a bowl and stir in the
onions, eggs, salt and pepper.
Make a test latke: Heat 1 /8-inch of oil in a large
nonstick skillet over high heat until the oil is hot
but not smoking. Working in batches, spoon 2
tablespoons of the mixture into the hot oil. Spread
the mixture into a round with a fork or the tip of a
spoon.
Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the
bottom of the latke is golden, about 5 minutes. Turn
the latke over and cook until it is golden on the
other side.
Taste your test latke for seasoning. Adjust the
amount of salt and pepper if necessary. (Note: If the
latke batter is too watery — you'll know if the egg
mixture spreads beyond the potato mixture — you
may need to add a little flour, matzah meal or bread-
crumbs to the batter to soak up the extra moisture.)
Working in batches, fry the remaining batter.
Serve the latkes immediately; or, to keep warm until
needed, place them on a paper towel-lined baking

oA

11/22

2002

87

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan