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September 13, 2002 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2002-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ESTHER ALLWEISS
TSCHIRHART
Special to the Jewish News

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ews have disagreed about
Zionism, the need for a
Jewish political state, since
Theodor Herzl began pro-
moting his vision in 1896.
Presenting some of the competing
viewpoints, particularly among
Orthodox Jews, Chaya Batya
Neugroschl, a Harvard and Yeshiva

With the tragedies in Israel and
"emotional connections being fired
now," the Orthodox community is
looking again at its relationship with
the Jewish state. She said knowing
Zionism's history might help one
understand the viewpoint of reli-
gious settlers in Israel today.
Neugroschl said Herzl's call for a
"publicly recognized, legally secured
homeland in Palestine" was a "revo-
lutionary moment." He saw that
despite the French emancipation of

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64

"

Chaya Batya Neugroschl

University-educated scholar, gave a
history of Zionism Aug. 25 at the
Sara Tugman Bais Chabad Torah
Center in West Bloomfield.
The young, dynamic director of
admissions and Judaic studies faculty
at Ma'ayanot Yeshiva High School in
Teaneck, N.J., delivered the 14th
annual memorial lecture honoring
the yahrtzeit of Gedalya ben Chaim
Leib Schochet, Neugroschl's grandfa-
ther. Her mother and stepfather,
Rivka and Claude Schochet of West
Bloomfield, are congregation mem-
bers and lecture sponsors.
"For the Orthodox, Zionism is
not n inherently welcome topic. We
are unsure o how to relate to it,"
Neugroschl told an au fence of.50.

Jews in 1791, they did not enjoy
equal citizenship rights.
France questioned whether Jews
could be assimilated: Were they a
nation within a nation? Emperor
Napoleon Bonaparte in 1806 con-
vened the Great Sanhedrin, named
after the Jewish governing body of
Roman times. It disavowed the con-
cept of a separate "nationhood of
Jews," but even converted Jews could
not find social acceptance in gentile
society.
That set the stage for Herzl, an
assimilated Jew, whose Zionist
adherents typically were without
money or power, Neugroschl said.
Much of the frum (religious)
world, traditionally segregated from

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