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March 22, 1996 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1996-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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84

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VICTIMS page 83

Among the mourners who
came to visit the Barikashvili
family during the week of shiva
was their cousin and neighbor,
Gabriel Shemashvili. A commu-
nications engineer in Georgia,
Mr. Shemashvili, 43, worked in
a toiletries factory on the No. 18
route. "He was saying how he'd
just missed that bus to work,"
said Michael Barikashvili. "Dur-
ing the week of my father's shi-
va, Gabriel was hardly alive, he
was in pain with all of us.
"When we got up from the shi-
va the next Sunday, we heard
that another No. 18 bus had been
bombed," Mr. Barikashvili con-
tinued. "We called all our rela-
tives who take the No. 18 to see
if they were all right. When we
called Gabriel's factory, they told
us he hadn't arrived at work. We
kept calling the hospitals but
they told us he wasn't on the list
of injured, and a few hours later
we found out he was dead."
Across town is a neighborhood
called Old Katamon. It is one of
the most elegant parts of the city,
with graceful old Jerusalem stone
houses and apartment buildings,
and a population dominated by
highly educated, professional
Ashkenazis.
During the week of the shiva,
the home of Yonatan Barnea's fa-
ther Nachum, star writer of Is-
rael's leading daily newspaper,
Yediot Aharonot, was filled to
overflowing with the country's
cultural and political elite.
Eight days later, it wasn't a
journalist's son who was killed
but a journalist — Dani Tverski,
58, a veteran of Ha'aretz's night
desk. The Dizengoff bombing
took place about 4 in the after-
noon; when Mr. Tverski didn't ar-
rive at work that evening, his
colleagues feared he was one of
the victims. The newspaper's eu-
logy explained why: "In all his
years on the job he never missed
a shift, and never showed up late
at the desk."
A workaday journalist, a fa-
mous journalist's son. New im-
migrants and the descendants of
early immigrants. Soldiers. The

Jerusalem underclass and
Jerusalem elite. The murdered
came from all sorts of subcul-
tures.
Others could not be grouped or
contrasted so readily; they were
just themselves: Inbar Attia, 22,
a waitress at a Tel Aviv fish
restaurant, killed at Dizengoff.
Uzi Cohen, 54, a Jerusalem po-
liceman, killed in the second No.
18 bus bombing.
On a ridge overlooking the
Katamonim, alongside a major
thoroughfare, there is a mound
of boulders that were painted
pastel colors by local children
some years ago. After the first No.
18 bus bombing, a group of Kata-
monim youths called "Children
of the Neighborhood" turned the
mound into a memorial for the
dead.
They posted black flags be-
tween the boulders. They come
every night to light yahrzeit can-
dles and to fill cans with kerosene
and light them, too.
The leader of the group, Shlo-
mo Vazana, is a longtime Kata-
monim activist and teacher at
Jerusalem's High School of Art.
One of his students was army
Sgt. Sharon Chanuka, 19, who
lived in Old Katamon and died
on the first No. 18.
Asked what sort of person Ms.
Chanuka was, Mr. Vazana said
she was "a very, very determined
student."
When innocents are murdered,
their family, friends and ac-
quaintances understandably
speak of them in platitudes. Mr.
Vazana opened a notebook he
borrowed from Ms. Chanuka's
parents, a notebook of her poet-
ry. This is the ending of a poem
she wrote in July 1993:

Look up
and you can see
everything that was
and is no more.
Tears of regret
for all that was taken.
The sky has long been empty
and the air is still heavy -
but everything remains
unforgiven. ❑

This Return To Roots
Is Like Coming Home

BOAZ DVIR SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

I

sraeli singers and actors are
getting high — but not on
drugs. They are becoming re-
ligiously observant — chozrim
betesuvah, returning to their
Jewish roots.
In recent months, about 20 of
the more hip figures in the en-
tertainment scene have started
becoming Orthodox. The men,
like singer Tamir Albert, are

wearing yarmulkes, putting on
tefilin and praying every day, ac-
cording to Maariv.
The women are exchanging
their sexy outfits for long, simple
dresses that cover almost every
patch of skin, Maariv reports.
"I'm trying to do [as many
mitzvot as] I can," Mr. Albert told
Maariv. "I heard that there is a
big wave of chazrah betesuvah

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