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November 10, 1995 - Image 110

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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JE- wish UNi-ry ShAbbAT • NOVEMbER 1 0 -1 1, 1 9 9 5

For use at your dinner table

Conversation Starters on Jewish Unity

Building Bridges of Understanding - Jew to Jew

My friend, whom I shall call Becky, is a Jewish woman married to my hus-
band's buddy from the "old neighborhood." Becky, whose parents are
Protestant, keeps a kosher home, regularly attends services at a Reform
temple where she is active, and keeps Shabbat with her children and
husband.

Describe the diversity of Jewish practice which
exists in your family, or which existed within past
generations. Were there tensions, or were
misunderstandings bridged?

Several years ago, after Becky's conversion to Judaism, she was told by a
friend, "Someday your daughter might meet a nice Jewish boy who will not
marry her because she is not 'Jewish enough." Astounded, Becky checked
with her rabbi, who told her that "most but not all" other Jews would find
Becky's children "acceptable."

How can or does your family promote respect for
differences, and increase understanding about the
diversity of the Jewish community?

Becky was one of the many people who attended the community forum
sponsored by the Jewish Community Council two years ago. Rabbi Yitz
Greenberg had been invited to address our community on the issues of the
divisions within Judaism.

How can we improve communication between
organizations and individuals of varying degrees of
observance in our community?

Should there be standards for community-wide
events regarding kashrut and respect for
Shabbat, so that no one will be offended, no level
of observance compromised?

What can be done to ensure that there will be one
Jewish people in the year 2000?



Rabbi Greenberg mentioned that night that the expertise and success of the
Jewish Community Council is in the field of community relations. The
Jewish Community Council is known for building bridges between Jews and
Christians, Jews and African Americans, Jews and Arab Americans, Jews and
whomever. 'Why not," he suggested, "build bridges between Jews and
Jews?" That evening, Rabbi Greenberg lay down a challenge. Could the
Detroit Jewish community successfully address the issues that divide Jew
from Jew?

Question: How can we foster respect for each other as Jews?

I

Excerpted from an article by Jeannie Weiner, immediate past president
of the Jewish Community Council of Metropolitan Detroit

Light One Candle For Unity

HINEI MA TOV

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Hinei ma tov uma na'im
Shevet achim gam yachad.

Behold how good
and how pleasant it is
When brothers and sisters
dwell together in unity.

Sponsored by.
The Jewish News and
The Jewish Community Council
(810) 642-5393

Light one candle for the strength that we need
to never become our own foe.
And light one candle for those who are suffering
the pain we learned so long ago.
Light one candle for all we believe in,
let anger not tear us apart.
And light one candle to bind us together
with unity as the song in our heart.

Don't let the light go out, it's lasted for so many years!
Don't let the light go out, let it shine through our love and our tears.

What is the memory that's valued so highly
that we keep it alive in that flame?
What's the commitment to those who have died
when we cry out they've not died in vain?
We have come this far, always believing.
that Judaism will somehow prevail.
This is the burden, and this is the promise
and this is why we will not fail.

Don't let the light go out, it's lasted for so many years!
Don't let the light go out, let it shine through our love and our tears.

Don't let the light go out...Don't let the light go out...Don't let the
light go out!
( adapted from a song by Peter Yarrow)

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