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April 07, 1995 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1995-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FROM THE
PRESIDENT

Betsy G. Winkelman, President
Resettlement Service

It is a pleasure to give you an update of
recent initiatives undertaken by
Resettlement Service to enhance our com-
munity's resettlement program.
The staff and board have initiated several
wonderful projects since last autumn to
assist the new families in our midst, and to
inform and include our Jewish community
as a working partner in the resettlement
process.
In October, 1994, Resettlement Service
board presented a program for the reli-
gious school students of Adat Shalom
Synagogue and their parents simulating
the intake procedures used during the
resettlement process. The participants
pretended to be newcomers and thereby
gained insight into the many challenges
faced by the emigres. This effective and
educational program can be made avail-
able to other groups in the community.
We also initiated "Friendly Encounters
of a Jewish Kind", in which Resettlement
board members and their families are
matched to new families who have lived
here for a short time. The encounter is
centered around an activity shared by both
families and presents a wonderful opportu-
nity for informal acculaturation.
In November, we launched our "Teams
Visits". At least ten teams, each consist-
ing of one American-born English speaker
and one former refugee Russian speaker,
visited the newest families, welcoming
them to our community with a short,

RS CASEWORKER BECOMES
U.S. CITIZEN

Tanya Fingerman came to the United States in 1989. The
former interpreter went through the resettlement process in
Boston. In July, 1989, she moved to Detroit, and started
work as a receptionist for Jewish Family Service. In 1990,
she was promoted to caseworker for Resettlement Service.
Mrs. Fingerman estimates that, during the past 5 years, she
has helped close to 200 families embark on their new lives
in the Detroit area.
On November 28, 1994, "one of the defining achieve-
ments of my life," Tanya realized her dream and became a
U.S. citizen. She says: "I am so happy because the country
Tanya Fingerman
where I was born deprived me of my citizenship when I left
it. I lived as a stateless person for 5 years until the U.S., the country that gave me
refuge, granted me citizenship status."
The joyous occasion was celebrated by the staffs of Jewish Family Service and
Resettlement Service at a party given in Tanya's honor. Often, now, Tanya receives
many calls from refugees regarding the citizenship process.
Everyone at Jewish Family Service and Resettlement Service congratulates Tanya on
this very happy achievement.

DID YOU KNOW?

• The United States allows people to apply for citizenship if they have been permanent
residents for 5 years.

RESETTLEMENT
SERVICE WELCOMES
NEW DIRECTOR

Rachel Yoskowitz has been named
Director of Resettlement Service. She
comes to this position after serving as
Director of Adolescent Health Services,
Delaware Division of Public Health,
Department of Health and Social Services.
For her master's thesis she developed a
health education and orientation to the
U.S. health care system for emigres from
the former Soviet Union.
Ms. Yoskowitz says: "Resettlement
Service has a long history of helping our
fellow Jews and I am proud to be a part of
this effort in our community." She plans
"to continue to work with our volunteers,
community and staff to help newly-arriv-
ing refugees to effectively achieve self
sufficiency and acculturation."
The staff of Resettlement Service is
privileged to have Ms. Yoskowitz as direc-
tor, and wishes her a long, happy associa-
tion with the agency.

• Applicants have to pass either the written or oral exam on the history and structure of
the United States government.

• When receiving a Certificate of Citizenship, an immigrant can assume any first or last
name he or she chooses.

• Jews from the former Soviet Union enjoy one of the highest percentages (62%) of
becoming United States citizens.

1111111111111111118111

TRENDS IN RESETTLEMENT ARRIVALS

Resettlement Service has resettled the following numbers of individuals during the months of
October, November and December, 1994, and January, 1995:

Monthly Totals

Children

Elderly

October — 23

4

6

November — 40

11
9

6

11

4

2

December — 42

January

— 16

1

("children" ages 0 - 17 — "elderly" ages 65 and over)

TOTAL NEW ARRIVALS FOR 1994-529 PERSONS

L to R: Betsy Winkleman, Margaret Demant,
Barbara Nusbaum, and Marcy Feldman
with shower gifts.

friendly visit and a small gift.
In December and again in January,
friends, bringing new, beautiful and useful
household items for our newcomers, met
at showers initiated by Federation's
Womens' Division Communiteas pro-
gram. In March, Resettlement Service
participated in our community's Tzedakah
Experience, and was one of the recipients
of funds raised by the participating stu-
dents. Finally, at the end of March the
Board of Resettlement Service hosted a
shower for the newcomers, inviting over
100 community leaders who generously
brought gifts, and who were given in
return an enhanced understanding of our
agency services and programming ideas
for their own organizations.
Through our many activities, the staff
and board of Resettlement Service has
endeavored successfully to help the new-
comers integrate into their new communi-
ty. We are looking forward to meeting the
challenges of serving the large numbers of
refugees who continue to resettle in the
metropolitan Detroit area.

FROM THE BACK
OF THE TRUCK

At the time this is being written,
Resettlement Service is experiencing
it's most serious lack of furniture dona-
tions in recent memory. Fortunately,
the agency is able to purchase new
beds for the new arrivals, but many
will have a long wait for the tables and
chairs, sofas, dressers, lamps and other
items necessary for a comfortable level
of living. After a bed, the most press-
ing need is for a table and chairs.
Again, the staff and clients of
Resettlement Service thank the com-
munity for its generous furniture dona-
tions during past years, and, in
advance, thanks those who will donate
furniture in the future. Remember, all
furniture donations are tax-deductable.

FOR FURNITURE PICK-UP
APPOINTMENT AND OTHER
INFORMATION CALL SUSAN
ULANOFF AT (810)559-4566.

JFS THANKS ITS FRIENDS OF THE FAMILY

Jewish Family Service recently completed its annual Friends of the Family Membership Drive. This effort raises needed funds which sup-
port agency programs serviing Jewish children, older adults and families.
With sincere thanks, we would like to acknowledge the following individuals for their generosity as 1994/95 Friends of the Family:

FRIENDS:

Andrew and Lisa Barbas
Mary Brophy/Philip Kessler
Robert and Susan Citrin
Bruce Frankel
Edward and Francine Gold
Irving Gould
Nancy and Stephen Grand
Barbara Grant
Gerald Harris/Furniture Club
M.G. and Gail Hennes
David and Doreen Hermelin
Michael Horowitz
John and Gilda Jacobs
Nancy Jacobson
Martin and Cis Maisel Kellman
Agnes Klein
Robert and Michelle Kleiman
Caren L. Landau
Frances and Fred Marblestone
John and Judy Marx
Irving and Barbara Nusbaum
Sophie Pearlstein
Stuart Pernick
Marta and Benjamin Rosenthal
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Rubinstein

Helen and Frederick Shevin
Lewis and Cheryl Silver
Buzz and Jan Silverman
Gary and Francine Snyder
Brent and Nancy Triest
Betsy and Mike Winkelman
William and Janis Wetsman
Andrew and Helaine Zack
Helene Phillips/Paul Zerkel

SPONSORS:

Richard Blumenstein
Warren J. Coville
Fayga Dombey
Henry and Marla Dorfman
Beatrice and Joseph Epel
Harry and Rachel Maisel
Edythe Jackier-Mulivor
Allan and Joy Nachman
Donn and Edith Resnick
Arlene Rhodes
Marshal Rubin
Stollman Foundation

PATRONS:

Dr. and Mrs. Eli V. Berger
Abraham and Charlotte Burnstein
Steven P. and Amy D. Dunn

Sophie Fierro-Share
Ruth Gable
Bruce and Beverly Gale
Alan and Susan Goodman
Stephen L. Greenfield
Diane D. Hauser
Douglas and Ilene Klegon
David Lerner and Sharona Shapiro
Don and Gail Lansky
Mr. and Mrs. Myron L. Liner
Joel Lutz
Mark L. Small
Eleanor Snyder

DOUBLE CHAI:

Richard and Nancy Barr
Roz and Stanford Blanck
Douglas and Barbara Bloom
Stacy and Jeffrey Brodsky
Fran Cook
Fran Cox
Marcia Fligman
Peggy and Dennis Frank
Pola and Howard Friedman
Marlene Gropman
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Josephson
Herbert Kaufman

Esther and Henry 'Crystal
Rita Rochlen
Harriet and Fred Rosen
Howard Rosen
Alvin C. Sallen
Dr. Sheldon and Karen Schore
Norval and Judith Slobin
Joel and Florence Steinberg
Dr. Warren and Charlotte Tessler
Ruth Wayne
Eric Zuckerman, D.O.

CHAI:

Marvin and Helene Cherrin
Albert and Harriet Colman
Lawrence and Sara Epstein
Igor Gabrielov and Rimma Igolinskaya
Max Garber
Doris Goodman
Kerry and Elaine Greenhut
Paula Inowlocki
Deborah and Martin Karp
Milton P. Kogan
Melvy Erman Lewis
Steve and Beth Margolin
Albert and Dorothy Mazer

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