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June 03, 1994 - Image 112

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INN-MICHIGAN

(continued from page 44)

bles, chairs and rockers and are ac-
cented with art glass lamps. The din-
ing area features big round tables
where guests gather for the Scandi-
navian breakfast buffet.
In decorating the house in period
furnishings and art, the Lawrences
acquired an impressive and ever-
growing collection of arts and crafts
pieces. Their extensive research on
the subject and surplus collecting led
them to open the East Road Gallery,
which specializes in mission oak fur-
niture, art pottery, decorative acces-
sories from the late 1800s and early
1900s and compatible contemporary
art. Ed runs the shop on weekends
and publishes Antique Shop direc-
tories for Michigan and Indiana.
"Many people come to The Peb-
ble House because of the specialty
design," says Jean Lawrence. "But
the inn is ideal for anyone who loves
the lake, the dunes and the small re-
sort town atmosphere. Lake Michi-
gan is just across the road and
Warren Dunes State Park, Warren
Woods and New Buffalo harbor are
nearby, as well as antique shops, bou-
tiques, galleries, wineries and good
restaurants."

Maze ! lov . i

So remember us for your next

Whatever the occasion — wedding,
bar mitzvah, anniversary, or holiday —
Southfield Hilton. Garden Inn has a
great deal for you.

-

simcha and get a deal that frill
win you congratulations
around.

BIG ROOMS

SMALL PRICE

Well give your visiting guests
spacious, haimish accommodations
at our low BounceBack Tre ekend
rate, plus free continental breakfast.
And well. give you the perfect setting
for a party or reception, with Kosher
caterers always welcome.

II[

Southfield

GARDEN INN

SOUTHFIELD HILTON GARDEN INN • 26000 AMERICAN DRIVE • SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48034 • 313-357-1100
For reservations or information, call 1-800 HILTONS. Ask about our corporate rates.

*Offer ralid every Thursday (with Saturday stay), Friday, and Saturday until 12127193.
Rate subject to change. Limited availability. advance booking required.
Rate does not inchule tax or gratuities and does not apply to meetings, conventions, or other promotional offers.

National House Inn

ASK FOR SALLY



258-5788

"

Fax us
258-DANA

CATERING

FOR GROUPS 20 - 5000







Banquets
Barbecues
Bar Mitzvahs
Cocktail Parties
Garden Parties







Grand Openings
Meetings
Open House
Proms
Rehearsal Dinners







Retirements
Reunions
Seminars
Showers
Weddings

Tour complete party outfitter!









Hors D'oeuvres
Buffets • Hot & Cold
Party Tray For All Ocassions
Complete Dinners
Complete Alcoholic Beverages
Banquets
Delivery & Service

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BEER • WINE • SPIRITS

Gracious Dining & Off Premises Catering

STERLING VINEYARDS'

WINEMAKING FROM THE GROUND UP

46 • SUMMER 1994 • STILE

190 N. Hunter Blvd. • Bimi ingham
258-5788

fi

The National House, Michigan's
oldest operating inn, is located just
off I-94 in Marshall, a town national-
ly recognized for its outstanding
cross-section of authentic 19th cen-
tury architecture. The Greek Revival
style inn was built in 1835 as a stage-
coach stop on the route between De-
troit and Chicago. Itwas restored in
1976 and named to the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places when it re-
opened as a bed & breakfast in time
for the Bicentennial celebration.
A beam and brick open-hearth
fireplace warms and welcomes visi-
tors in the downstairs entryway,
while an upstairs sitting lounge with
fireplace also provides a cozy retreat.
The 16 guests rooms, which range
from intimate quarters to two-room
suites, all have private baths and are
furnished in elegant Victorian or ro-
mantic French Country decor. A con-
tinental breakfast with a wide
selection of home-baked goods and
afternoon tea is served in the coun-
try-style dining room.
Turreted Queen Armes, Italianate
villas and Gothic Revival and Greek
Revival homes are among the 130
historic buildings in Marshall. The
National House, overlooks the
Brooks Memorial Fountain and the
clock tower that serves as the Town
Hall. Directly across from the foun-
tain circle is the "Honolulu House

Museum, built in 1860 by Abner
Pratt, the first U.S. Consul to the
Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands. The
town is also home to Win Schuler's
flagship restaurant.
In addition to Marshall Antiques
Market weekends on June 18-19, July
16-17, Sept 17-18 and Oct 15-16, oth-
er coming events include "Fiesta of
the Fifties" parade of vehicles June
24-26, the annual Independence Day
celebration, "Welcome to My Gar-
den" tours on July 9 and 10, the Cal-
houn County Fair Aug. 14-20, the
National House romantic garden
walk Aug. 14 and the annual historic
home tour Sept 10-11. At other times
during the year, National House
sponsors afternoon tea lectures, can-
dlelight tours and mystery week-
ends.

Bunn-Pher Hill

Bunn-Pher Hill, near the Pinck-
ney Recreation Area, is a country re-
treat only an hour from Detroit and
20 minutes from Ann Arbor. The
rambling cottage on Baseline Lake
is the residence, studio and guest-
house of fiber artist and Wayne State
University instructor Urban Jupena.
When Jupena bought property on
a dirt road in Livingston County in
1976, his friends kidded him that he
was going out to "bunny and gopher"
land. He promptly named the week-
end getaway Bunn-Pher Hill (a com-
bination of the first part of bunny and
last letters in gopher).
The original structure was a horse
barn built in the 1920s. Jupena added
a salt-glazed silo, brought to the site
piece by piece from Brighton, and
turned the barn into a unique resi-
dence. The silo, now functioning as
a fireplace and chimney, stands as
the focal point of the three-story
lodge room, the favorite gathering
place for guests. Two guest rooms
occupy the second floor and share a
balcony sitting room overlooking the
fireplace and the garden beyond.
In 1979 Jupena.added a weaving
studio and new areas to display his
collection of antiques and contem-
porary arts and crafts. Two guest
suites with screened porches that
look out on a garden pond were built
in 1984. They are both furnished with
Native American and arts and crafts
objects.
Depending on how you count the
spaces, the barn has grown to a 15-
or 20-room house filled with art, in-
cluding the artist's own wall-hang-
ings, rugs and pillows. In addition to
being treated to a house of art, guests
enjoy the hospitality of Jupena and
partner Steve Levicki and the serene

.

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