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January 28, 1994 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

News

TAKE ACTION

TALKS page 36

And Call

ACTIANGT NORTGAG1

TODAY!

FAC,'1t
SUGGESTED ACTION(S)
•Rates are still low, and
• Call EMC to refinance
coming back down again • Call EMC to prequalify for a new purchase
• Call your realtor
• Property taxes are dropping • Call EMC to prequalify for a new purchase
• Call your realtor
• Property transfer tax is
• Call EMC to prequalify for a new purchase
likely to pass
• Call your realtor, immediately
•You may owe taxes on your • Call EMC for a rate reduction and/or cash
1993 1040
out refinance
• Call your CPA
• Call your realtor and get a bigger
(tax write off) house

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Organization "into a full
agreement."
The talks in Washington
are dealing with other
issues, such as the nature of
future Palestinian elections
and the structure of the Pa-
lestinian elected body, Mr.
Peres said.
In Taba, the Israeli-PLO
negotiations focused ex-
clusively on issues of tele-
communications and media.
The director-general of
Israel's Communications
Ministry, Shalom Wax, led
Israeli officials in detailed
and technical discussions
with the Palestinians on the
creation of Palestinian radio
and television facilities.
The negotiators at Taba
avoided discussing security
issues — apparently because
both sides were aware that
the meeting last weekend in
Oslo between Mr. Arafat and
Mr. Peres, while registering
significant progress, had not
yet achieved the

breakthroughs needed for
implementation of the ac-
cord.
Among the security issues
that have delayed the start
of implementation, schedul-
ed to begin Dec. 13, is the
question of who will control
the border crossings between
the Gaza Strip and Egypt
and between the West Bank
town of Jericho and Jordan.
In Jerusalem, Mr. Peres
told reporters after meeting
with the Egyptian foreign
minister that he was hopeful
progress could be made with
Mr. Arafat.
But, he added, "don't let's
describe things that still
need to be concluded as
though they were already
concluded."
In his conference call with
Jewish journalists, the for-
eign minister said he had
engaged in a "down-to-earth
talk" with Mr. Arafat in
Oslo. 0

Israeli Travelers
Unwelcome In Nepal

Kathmandu, Nepal (JTA) —
Israeli music plays in the
background. The waiters
greet the customers, "Erev
tov, Shabbat Shalom."
Homestyle dishes on the
menu include falafel,
schnitzel and humus and
menus are frequently in
Hebrew.
But locales like the Abu
Rami restaurant here,
where Israelis had long felt
welcome, are becoming more
and more scarce in Nepal,
one of the most popular des-
tinations among young
Israeli travelers.
Drawn by the challenge of
trekking in the spectacular
serenity of the Himalayas,
thousands of Israelis just
beyond their army service
flock to Nepal each year. But
many, excited by the pro-
spects of traveling abroad
and seeing the world, are
finding that a bad reputa-
tion has preceded them.
After a host of bad experi-
ences in which Israelis have
been accused of at best
disrespect and rudeness and
worse violence and theft,
Israelis are finding it im-
possible to change their
image here and are no
longer wanted in this friend-
ly country.
Iris Alfoar and Vered
Lichter, both 22, were refus-
ed accommodations several
times on the Annapurna
Circuit trek, which has been

most popular with Israelis.
Two incidents allegedly in-
itiated by Israelis resulted in
melees and have clouded the
reception for Israelis.
Both Israelis and Nepalese
acknowledge that cultural
differences account for some
of the problems. Both also
concur that a clash is in-
evitable because the brash,
loud nature of Israelis is
perceived as obtrusive by the
meek and polite Nepalese.
Another explanation of
Israeli behavior in Nepal is
that the young men recently

Several incidents
have clouded the
reputations of the
Israelis.

released from the army are
still caught up in the macho
military culture in which
they have been immersed for
the past three to four years.
Israelis in Nepal are
known to constantly com-
pete with one another, to
prove who can push himself
the furthest, carry the
heaviest backpack, and
climb the mountain the
fastest. This kind of conduct
is seen as the antithesis of
the Asian religions, which
promote non-violence and
tranquillity.

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