100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 29, 1993 - Image 124

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Compm?
A

24600 Grand River Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48219

Reform Movement
Issues Conduct Code

(313) 531-2600

PROUDLY PRESENTS

A TREMENDOUS LEASE OPPORTUNITY

A BRAND NEW 1994
SEVILLE SLS

'499 45

per month for only
24 months*

This lease is an
exclusive for read-
ers of The Jewish
News! Be sure to
mention this ad or
The Jewish News
for this outstanding
offer.

Closed end lease for qualified customers, lease payment of $499A5 for 24 months, 24,000 mile limitation, 15 cents per
mile for excess mileage over 24,000 miles. Lessee has option to purchase at lease end for $22,363A6. Lessee is responsi-
ble for excessive wear and tear. Total payment under lease is $11,986.80. Due at lease inception is first month's payment,
down payment of $3,225 and refundable security deposit of $500 plus title fees. All taxes included.

1 696

10 MILE

'. s

0

.

8WAI

7 MILE

6 MU

5 MILE

iii.C.1.4

Eft
111

111111

4 1'

At Dreisbach & Sons you're not just a customer, you're family.

Cr)

w

Cr)

LU

CC

LU

LU

124

TEL- TWELVE MALL
SOUTHFIELD
313 - 355-3660



San Francisco (JTA) —
Stung by accusations of sex-
ual misconduct in the rab-
binate, the governing body
for Reform rabbis has ap-
proved what it calls its most
stringent ethical guide- lines
ever.
The new code, which is
designed to remove the
secrecy that often accom-
panies charges of ethical
misconduct, was passed by
the movement's Central
Conference of American
Rabbis this summer in Mon-
treal at its annual con-
ference.
The committee made three
main changes in its original
ethics code, which was last
amended in 1991. Under the
new rules:
• CCAR's national Com-
mittee on Ethics and Ap-
peals is permitted to in-
vestigate a rabbi when it be-
lieves an ethical violation
has occurred, even if no one
has filed a formal complaint.

• If a full-scale ethics
committee investigation of
a rabbi ensues, the com-
mittee can recommend that
the rabbi be frozen out of the
CCAR's placement service.
That could seriously limit a
rabbi's chances of finding a new
pulpit while under investiga-
tion of misconduct.
• Once a rabbi has been
reprimanded or censured,
news of the punishment will
be printed in the CCAR's
monthly newsletter. The
newsletter, which goes out to
the 1,700 North American
Reform rabbis, will not,
however, print the nature of
the ethical violation.
"These are enormous
changes," said Rabbi Con-
stance Golden, a member of
the Committee on Ethics
and Appeals who emphasiz-
ed the need for greater
openness about the in-
vestigation process.
"There's a big rumor mill
out there," said Rabbi
Golden, a pulpit rabbi in
Philadelphia. "It used to be
that the ethics committee
couldn't do anything unless
there was something in
writing. If no one brought it
to us, (an ethics violation)
would have gone by the
wayside."
The changes in the code
follow a string of highly
publicized sexual miscon-
duct allegations that have
rocked the Reform move-
ment — as well as the

Catholic Church and several
Christian denominations —
over the past few years.
Before those allegations
began to surface, sexual
misconduct among clergy
was not seen as a major
problem, said Rabbi Julie
Spitzer, Mid-Atlantic Coun-
cil regional director of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations' in Washing-
ton, D.C., an organization
that represents Reform syn-
agogues throughout North'
America.
"When there were kids in-
volved, or gross multiple
violations, those things were
considered rare, particularly
in the Jewish community,"
said Rabbi Spitzer, also a
member of the advisory
board of the Center for
Prevention of Sexual and
Domestic Violence.
"Among religious leaders
in America right now," she
added, "sexual misconduct is
probably the hottest topic."
The Rabbinical Code of
Ethics — the formal name
for the new CCAR

Once a rabbi has
been reprimanded
or censured, news
of the punishment
will be printed in
the CCAR's monthly
newsletter.

guidelines — includes sec-
tions on the "avoidance of
commercialism" by con-
gregational rabbis to
discourage the selling of
spiritual services; regula-
tions against rabbinic sexual
relationships with congrega-
tion, staff and other rabbis;
and descriptions of how
violations of the code will be
investigated.
Reform rabbis are required
to follow all aspects of the
code.
The recent changes in the
code "are in reaction to what
has transpired not only in
the rabbinate, but in
organized religion in gen-
eral," said Rabbi Arnold
Sher, CCAR director of
placement in New York.
"The CCAR tried to give
more teeth to its ethics
code," he said.
"The ethics committee can

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan