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September 25, 1992 - Image 110

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year.

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.

ESTHER &
DAVID WEINGARTEN

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year.

SHELLY & RUTH WEITZ

1:Inn

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.

JOHN, CHERYL, ERIC & JENNIFER SLAIM

ESTHER & EDDIE SHERMAN & FAMILY

May the coming year be
one filled with health,
happiness and
prosperity for all our
friends and family.

THE SELIGMAN FAMILY
MADELON, LOU, MELISSA, ADRIANNE

to all
our friends
and relatives.

ZITA & LEO WEBER

Desert Wonders
In A Reserve

LYNN PORITZ

mu3L2

Special to The Jewish News

to all
our friends
and relatives.

MURRAY & LINDA GOLDENBERG
GOLDENBERG PHOTOGRAPHY

KEN MALACH & SHANE
Scottsdale, AZ

ravz

lann nalls mu'?

MU'?

ISRAEL

ran 711V2

to all
our friends
and relatives.

12,11D11

May the New Year Bring
To All Our Friends
and Family — Health,
Joy, Prosperity
and Everything
Good in Life.

nalz

anon

to all
our friends
and relatives.

to all
our friends
and relatives.

HOWARD & ALEX SPINNER

JACK & JANE SWEET

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.
SIMCHA
an organization for Jewish Lesbians & Gays

May the coming year be
one filled with health,
happiness and
prosperity for all our
friends and family.

HARVEY & DIANA STALBURG
DR. CAREN M. STALBERG
BARBI STALBURG, GRANDMA FAE STALBURG
& GRANDPA FRED KOHEN

0

n a typically dry, hot
afternoon in an Arava
farmhouse, when all
but the staunchest desert
denizens have sought shelter
from the torrid Negev heat, a
Hatzeva farmer talks of the
social mores of the Arabian
babbler with as much ease as
a housewife might discuss the
price of tomatoes.
Lofty discourse? Not
especially. In the Arava, a
southern stretch of desert
settled with kibbutzim and
moshavim and home to the
Sheizaf Nature Reserve,
many of the settlers know
what flies, creeps or crawls
out from under just what
rock, thanks to the lectures
and guides from the Hatzeva
Field School.
On first glance, the Reserve
looks as desolate as an emp-
ty sandbox. There are no
herds of huge elephants, no
awesomely high peaks, and
no kitchy souvenir stands on
its 38,000 dunams of low hills

Many of the
settlers know what
flies, creeps or
crawls out from
under just what
rock, thanks to the
lectures.

and gravel terraces. But look
a bit closer and a fascinating-
ly ugly Egyptian dabb lizard
lazily slinks in and out of his
subterranean home; short,
graceful dorcus gazelle leap
across your path, and
zoologist Giora Ilany floats by
in an ultra-light plane on the
lookout for lizard.
"There's no gimmick here,"
says Rami Kushner, head of
the Hatzeva Field School,
which may explain why each
year only some 10 percent of
the Field School's 20,000
overnighters and 1,000 day-
trippers visit the Reserve.
Those who do, however, are in-
trigued by the ancient
terrain.
But to be best appreciated,
this particular patch of the
Rift needs some explaining,
for while most Israelis are on
first-name terms with just
about everyone, this familiari-
ty rarely extends to animals
of the wild. Advises Dr. Amos
Zahavi, founder of the
Hatzeva Field School, "the
wonders are not obvious and
the animals are a bit shy."

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