100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 01, 1992 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I INSIDE WASHINGTON

In 1991 I won
The Harry ( 2"T
and Sarah Laker
Israel Youth
Scholarship.

Arm Transfers May
Doom F-15s to Saudis

This year —
You Too Can Win a Year of Study
at a leading University in Israel.

Aaron Ellenbogen
Attending Thl-Aviv University

How do you qualify? You must be a resident of the Metropolitan Detroit area,

must be currently attending a college or university in the continental United
States, and must have applied to a school of higher learning in Israel.
What university will you attend? If you win the scholarship, you may attend The
Hebrew University, Ben Gurion University, Tel Aviv University, Bar Ilan University,
or Haifa University.

Bar llan University, one of the institutions the winner of the scholarship may attend

NOW CELEBRATING 16 YEARS

Phone (313) 352-8670

or write to the address below for application form or
information. Final day to apply is May 8, 1992.

THE HARRY and SARAH LAKER
ISRAEL YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP FUND

co-sponsored by Congregation Beth Achim, 21100 W. 12 Mile Rd., Southfield, MI 48076

LAWRENCE BLASE, M.D.
and
WILLIAM GONTE, M.D.

announce the establishment of their new office specializing in

INTERNAL MEDICINE,

SPORTS MEDICINE

AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE.

At

28501 Orchard Lake Road • Suite 120
Farmington Hills, MI 48334
(313) 489-4211

Complimentary cholesterol screening or body
fat analysis with first appointment.

ze

PRinev rtilAV 1 1000

Saudi transfer of U.S. arms to Arab
states is jeopardizing its acquisition of T2
F-15s.

JAMES DAVID BESSER

Washington Correspondent

T

wo weeks ago, it ap-
peared that the ad-
ministration would
face a tough fight in Con-
gress over the long-rumored
sale of 72 advanced F-15 jet
aircraft to Saudi Arabia.
Now, with official confir-
mation of a long pattern of
illegal transfers of American
arms from the Saudi
government to Syria, Iraq
and Bangladesh, the odds
against the administration
have lengthened con-
siderably. -
In recent weeks, all sides
in the shadow debate over
the F-15s have been jockey-
ing for position before the
actual battle begins. In
typical Washington fashion,
participants have sent out
dark hints about what might
happen in the upcoming
debate.
The administration has in-
timated that the package
would include some of the
most advanced F-15s, which
could pose a threat to Israel.
But those suggestions might
just be the opening gambits
in a bargaining process that
could result in a compromise
formula.
Jewish groups have been
sending out signals that
they are ready to go to the
mat to derail the sale,
despite the fact that, in the
past, groups like the Ameri-
can Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC) have in
the past chosen to sit out
major tussles over Saudi
arms sales.
But this, too, might just be
an opening move in what
will surely be a complex po-
litical chess match.
For now, one thing is clear:
The defense industry, hard
hit by the end of the Cold
War, sees the possible F-15
sale as a watershed.
"We've seen an aston-
ishing amount of lobbying
on this," said a staffer for a
leading pro-Israel legislator.
"The contractors have been
all over the Hill, arguing
that if we reject this sale, it
will cost the jobs of hundreds
of American workers."
In an election year, that
could be an effective political
cudgel.
But Israel's friends in

Congress, stung by the ad-
ministration's victory in
killing $10 billion in loan
guarantees to Israel, are
making it clear that the ex-
pected administration pro-
posal will face stiff
resistance.
Recently, a letter cir-
culated by Rep. Mel Levine,
D-Calif., urging the ad-
ministration to abandon the
rumored sale was signed by
more than 240 legislators.
The administration, sens-
ing the rebellious mood in
Congress, appears reluctant
to pick a major fight over the
F-15 sale, especially just
before a presidential elec-
tion.
"The Administration has
no choice but to take into ac-
count congressional opposi-
tion," said Jess Hordes,
Washington director for the

The defense
industry, hard hit
by the end of the
Cold War, is
lobbying hard for
the F-15 sale.

Anti-Defamation League.
"So what we're seeing is pos-
turing and maneuvering by
both sides to get the lay of
the land, with regard to do-
mestic politics, the peace
process and arms control in
the region."
The best guess now is that
these maneuvers will con-
tinue through the summer
— with a possible interim
sale of a half-dozen or so jets
in June, enough to keep the
production lines moving un-
til after the election.
But last week's charges ,.
that the Bush and Reagan
administrations secretly
funneled arms to Iraq's
Saddam Hussein through
the Saudis will make even
that kind of limited sale
unlikely.
But a spokesman admitted
that some weapons sold to
the Saudis were transferred
to Iraq and Syria. This ad-
mission will aid the case of
arms-sale opponents, and
muffle the impact of recent
charges that Israel had
transferred sensitive Ameri-
can military technology to
China. ❑

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan