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September 13, 1991 - Image 69

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

At Rosh Hashanah, Life Hot Ongefangn

By MARY KORETZ

Zint I was five years of age, I
have looked upon the tseit of Rosh
Hashanah als the onhayb of the
neie year. This perception was not
geboyt on religious grounds. It was
fargruntikt on my personal life cycle.
From kindergarten durch the
twelfth, I have tomed looked upon
my schooling as the tayl of my life.

Summer was a throw-away season,
that came tsvishn one class and the
kumendiker. Summer was shpiel
and idle conversation and the
freindlech sounds of childish
arguments and gelechter. Summer
was hits and shvays. Ayder air
conditioners and anti-perspirants,
one expected yeder to perspire
profusely.
One expected to see the linen
handkerchiefs in constant use. Oft
mo/ when you hot gelekt your lips,
you could taste the salt of your own
sweat. It was a familiar and
eingenemene sensation. Lastly,
summer was games: hide and zuch,
royt rover cross over, the boys
played marbles and baseball, the
maydlech played house and jacks.
As the herbst season and Rosh
Hashanah approached, the serious
business of life hot ongefangn.
School started and we became
engaged in learning vie to vern
successful dervaksene. Along with
reading, shreibn and arithmetic, we
learned to sit for endless shoun in
morgue-like ruik. We also learned to
walk in a gleich line. Thus, we
walked to the vashtsimer where we
learned to relieve ourselves at a
specified tseit.
After completing the tsvelter

grade hob ich zich bakent with the
Great Depression. Summer became
the time to fardinen tuition gelt for
college. As much time was spent
zuchn for employment as working
on a job. It hot genumen 10 yore to
complete my formal education.
Following my university years,
my arbet experience has been, for
the merste part, in the field of
education. It still is. So my year
actually haybt on in September as it
always has — about the time of
Rosh Hashanah.

become
adults
writing
hours
quiet
straight
washroom
time
twelfth
become
acquainted with

fardinen
gelt
zuchn
hot genumen
yorn
arbet
merste
haybt on

earn
money
looking
took
years
work
most
starts

Mary Kiretz is a long-time teacher of
Yiddish with Yorkmen's Circle.

Vocabulary

zint
tseit
als
onhayb
neie
geboyt
fargruntikt
durch
tomed
tayl
tsvishn
kumendiker
shpiel
freindlech
gelechter
hits
shvays
ayder
yeder
oft mol
hot gelekt
eingenemene
zuch
royt
maydlech
herbst
hot ongefangn
vie

since
time
as
beginning
new
based; built
founded
through
always
part
between
next one
play
friendly
laughter
heat
perspiration
before
everyone
many times
licked
pleasant
seek
red
girls.
autumn
began
how

Grandma's Remedies

TEA from Russia and Greece.
For a fever or an upset stomach.
Brew lots of mint or fennel herb tea,
or regular tea with lemon, and
drink, drink, drink.
HONEY AND MILK from
Russia. For a sore throat. Mix 1/2
cup of hot milk and 1/2 cup hot
water. Dissolve 2 tablespoons of
honey in the mixture. Drink up!
SALT IN A SOCK from
Greece. For a chest cold. Don't
eat this! Heat the salt in a pan.
Pour it into a sock and tie the
sock shut. Place it on your chest
or back.
PAIN KILLER from Morocco.
For toothaches. Soak a piece of

vern
dervaksene
shreibn
shoun
ruik
gleich
vashtsimer
tseit
tsvelter
hob ich zich bakent

cotton in arak (a Middle Eastern
liquor). Sprinkle pepper and salt on
. the cotton and place it on the tooth.
EGGPLANT JUICE from
Turkey. For a bad cough. Bake an
eggplant till it's soft. Squeeze out
the juice and drink up.
GUGGLE MUGGLE from
Poland. For a cold, or if your
grandma decides you look pale and
run-down. Put 1 raw egg, 1/2 tsp.
of vanilla, 1 cup of warm milk, and
1 tbsp. of sugar in a mixing bowl.
Beat with an egg beater till it's
well mixed and bubbly. Drink up!

From the Jewish Kids Catalogue
Jewish Publication Society.

Famous Facts

Q, What famous Viennese-Jewish conductor was rescued from the
Nazis by LBJ?

A. In 1938 a young Erich
Leinsdorf had completed an
engagement as conductor with the
Metropolitan Opera in New York and
was staying on in the U.S. with
some friends. One day it dawned
upon him that his temporary visa
had almost expired and that his
application for an extension had not
yet been answered.
His hosts decided to approach
an aggressive young congressman
from Texas with whom they were
acquainted, Lyndon Baines
Johnson. Johnson immediately
began work in the same effective
thorough style that he would
employ in running the U.S. Senate
and the White House years later.
First he found out that
Leinsdorf's application had, indeed,
been rejected but, for some reason,
the rejection slip had not been
mailed. LBJ took advantage of the

clerical oversight by having "You
have seven days to leave the U.S."
replaced in the letter with "You
have six months."
The congressman then
proceeded to have Leinsdorf's
status changed to "permanent
resident." This was done by the
device of having the conductor go
abroad, in this case to Cuba, and
then return to the U.S. as a regular
immigrant. Of course, Johnson
meticulously checked to make sure
that Leinsdorf had all the necessary
documentation.

Leinsdorf went on to a
distinguished career as conductor
at the New York City Opera, the
Boston Symphony and other major
American orchestras.

Compiled by Dr. Matthew and
Thomas Schwartz.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-3

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