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September 13, 1991 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BUSINESS 1

THE
MORE
YOU...

BUY

THE
MORE
YOU...

Henry Dorfman

Continued from preceding page

VE

1st Item
50% OFF*
2nd Item 60% OFF
3 or more 75% OFF

CLEARANCE
CENTER
ONLY

*The most expensive item is
50% off and so on.

ONE
DAY

Henry Dorfman checks out a label on a premium brand bologna.

(founders of Payless Shoes).
The Dorfmans were treated
like family by the Pozezes.
His wife, Mala Weintraub,
survived a labor camp; and
Henry escaped the Nazis with
his father by jumping off a
train that carried his mother,
Glicka; brothers, Kalman and
Israel; and sister, Rachel, to
Treblinka death camp.

SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER 14

ti
1-111.A43-

10:00 AM-5:00 PM
SHERWOOD STUDIOS

WAREHOUSE

LJ

FARMINGTON
HILLS
a.f )
ES INDUSTRIAL CTR.

FINE FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES

24760 Crestview Ct. • Farmington Hills
476-3760 (Days of Sale)
354-9060 (Prior to Sale)

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY NOMINAL CHARGE
GROUPS SOLD AS COMPLETE SETS
PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED

ALL SALES FINAL

• • • • • • • • •
•• BOB mks TOYOTA :

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • _• • • • • •










N. NI,
Nb. 111.




16, 11. \
■■ •■



35200 Grand River

OPEN
Farmington Hills

SATURDAY

114

•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Happy Holidays!

WATCH OUT FOR
TOYOTA'S FALLING
PRICES.

YEAR-END
CLEARANCE

_ 478-0500

48

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1991

v io
























For three years, Henry and
his father lived
underground, hiding in
tunnels in Poland or in
farms of sympathetic gen-
tiles. They joined resistance
fighters at night to help res-
cue other Jews who had
escaped death trains.
"My little brother
(Kalman) was only four," he
recalls. "He wanted to jump,
but my mother wouldn't let
him. He was too young."
He never saw them again.
But Mala Dorfman found
her two sisters in Germany.
After the war, Henry and
Mala were married and
moved to Marburg, Ger-
many, where Henry worked
for the U.S. government in
the kosher meat depart-
ment.
For several years, Moshe
Dorfman remained in
Poland, where he remarried.
With his new wife, Moshe
Dorfman moved to Israel.
(They had three children.
Two of them, Rina and Gina,
live in metropolitan Detroit.
Tova remains in Israel.
Moshe Dorfman died four
years ago.)
Henry and Mala Dorfman
had moved to Germany so
Mala could be near her
sisters, Franka and Rosa
Weintraub, each a survivor
of Bergen-Belsen.
Franka married Allen
Charlupski, a man she met
at the camp. Rosa married
Julius Schaumberg. Even-
tually, the whole family
reunited in Detroit and
Henry Dorfman's brothers-
in-law joined him in the

meat business.
Before the war, the Dorf-
man family of Orthodox
Jews ran the local kosher
meat market in Radom,
Poland.
For generations before
Moshe, the Dorfmans cut
and manufactured meat.
Henry wanted to carry on
the tradition. And his game
plan didn't change when he
arrived in Kansas. Although
the Pozez family offered him
a future with their company,
he had no interest in retail.
In fact, for a short while,
he found a job in Kansas for
a meat company called Mor-
rell.
Everything changed with
his first trip to the Eastern
Market, where he saw Mr.
Shendler boning cattle and
cutting up steaks.
"I asked him for a job and
he asked me what I could
do," Mr. Dorfman recalls.
"He gave me a knife and I
cut up a hind."
He worked during the day
and finished high school in
the evening at Central. Five
months later, Mr. Shendler
named him manager. And
shortly after, Henry Dorf-
man bought the business.
In 1952, Henry Dorfman
and Allen Charlupski pur-
chased Frederick Packing
Co., where they slaughtered
10 hogs a day and groomed
the business into the present
day company that ranks na-
tionally as the 14th largest
pork processor. Mr.
Schaumberg also joined the
company.
Mr. Charlupski and Mr.
Schaumberg retired in the
past three years, leaving few
relatives in the company
other than Henry and Joel
Dorfman, and cousin, Eli
Dorfman, a vice president.
Mr. Charlupski, who was a
major shareholder, recently
sold his shares in connection
with his retirement, com-
pany officials say. His son,
Larry Charlupski, is

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