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May 31, 1991 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

EITEL DAHM

Welcomes To Our Staff:

Orley Re-Nominated At
United Jewish Charities

JIM SOKOLOFF

SALES & LEASING

Bavarian Motor Village
24717 Gratiot Avenue
East Detroit, MI 48021

(313) 772-8600

&

Auto- Strasse, Ltd.
617 Detroit St
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

(313) 663-3300

BMW & Mercedes-Benz Automobiles
We will pick up and deliver
your car at no charge!

(313) 772-8600
"We Lease All Makes And All Models."

"Hey, Detroit:

CHECK OUT THESE PISTONS!"

CALAIS

SUPREME

ANY MODEL
ANY STYLE
ANY OPTIONS

DELTA 88

$ 2 0 091 ) ,

33850 Plymouth Rd., Livonia

Oldsmobile

261-6900

'Notice to Buyer - Invoice Total - includes factory holdback and advertising assessments and
is not a net factory cost price to dealer. The invoice may also reflect the ultimate cost of the
vehicle in view of future rebates, allowances, discounts and Incentive awards from the manufac-
turer to the dealer. Dealer installed options are not Included and are extra. In stock units only.

ACTION MOTORS ACTION MOTORS ACTION MOTORS

18

FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1991

ACTION MOTORS

SI:1010F11 NOLLO V

SkI010141 NOIlOtif

Lowest Prices
Greatest Selection
Convenient Location
Higher Trade
In Value!

SILO LOW NOIJ.OV

ACTION MOTORS

ACTION MO

44

St1020141 NOII0V

ACTION MOTORS ACTION MOTORS ACTION MOTORS

ACTION MOTORS

ACTION MOTORS

Graham A. Orley has been
nominated to serve a second
term as president of United
Jewish Charities, whose an-
nual meeting and luncheon is
set for 11:45 a.m. June 5 at
Congregation Shaarey Zedek.
Election and installation of
officers and board members
will take place, and recent
donors to the Federated En-
dowment Fund will be
honored. Joseph L. Hudson,
Jr. will make the keynote
address.
A member of the Jewish
Welfare Federation Executive
Committee, Mr. Orley was a
major gifts chairman for the
Allied Jewish Campaign and
served as vice president of
UJC and chaired its real
estate committee. He is af-
filiated with Israel Bonds,
Congregation Shaarey Zedek,
Jewish War Veterans, Tech-
nion, Weizmann Institute,
Men's ORT and Franklin
Hills Country Club.
Nominated to serve another
term as vice presidents are
Shirley Harris, Michael W.
Maddin and Jack A. Robin-
son. Larry Sherman was
nominated to serve another
term as treasurer and Robert
P. Aronsson to continue as
secretary.
Marlene Borman has been
nominated to the board of
directors for an additional
three-year-term. Douglas
Etkin, Stanley Frank and Ar-

Graham Orley

thur Weiss have been
nominated to the board for a
first term.
Samuel Frankel, who will
be leaving the board, has
been nominated to become an
honorary life member of the
board.
UJC works with Jewish
Welfare Federation and its
agencies to coordinate fund-
raising and social services. It
oversees the maintenance of
communal properties and
manages endowment funds
for future communal needs.
There is a charge for the
luncheon. For reservations,
call United Jewish Charities,
965-3939, Ext. 125.

NCSY To Pay Students
To Learn Afer School

PHIL JACOBS

Managing Editor

S

tarting in September,
the Talmud could be
competing with
McDonald's and other after-
school employers for high
school students.
As part of a new National
Conference of Synagogue
Youth (NCSY) program,
minimum wage will be paid
to students who are inter-
ested in learning Talmud
after school.
"We came across a prob-
lem in NCSY," regional di-
rector Marc Cohn said. "The
problem was getting
teen-agers to commit to
learn. We got them to agree
with the philosophy of learn-
ing and that it was impor-
tant for them to learn. Get-
ting them to sit down and ac-
tually learn was another
thing."
Mr. Cohn said that be-
cause of tighter family

budgets, high school
students are often in a posi-
tion where there is less
money for extra-curricular
activities, including NCSY.
After-school jobs came at the
expense of the time and
desire to learn.
NCSY took an existing
program for adults called
Mifal Hashash where
students learn for two
weeks, are given a test, and
if they continue to learn,
they are paid.
"We took that idea and we
decided to apply it to the
kids," Mr. Cohn said. "We
didn't want them to give up
anything in place of learn-
ing. We said to compensate
them for missing out on an
after-school job, we'd pay
them. And that's what we're
doing."
The program has already
started in Cleveland and
Pittsburgh, with as many as
20 students getting paid for
learning. 0

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